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Canadian Technology Accreditation Board (CTAB) visits Doha, Qatar
CCTT
The Canadian Technology Accreditation Board (CTAB) has just completed the review of two engineering technology programs at the College of the North Atlantic — Qatar Campus. According to Lorry Fortin, Program Coordinator at CTAB "the three-day exercise was well planned, informative and the program evaluations very thorough." The teams were lead by Errol Persaud, PEng and Bryan Burt, CET.
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Memorial University to offer first management MSc in Atlantic Canada
Memorial University
Memorial University will become the first university in Atlantic Canada to offer an MSc in management. Prospective students have until May 15, 2014 to apply to join the inaugural cohort of the 2-year, thesis-based program. The program will offer five concentrations: general management, information systems, operations management, human resources management, and organizational behaviour. "Having this program at Memorial increases the likelihood of our post-secondary students being able to obtain research-focused work in Newfoundland and Labrador following graduation," said Wilfred Zerbe, Dean of MUN's business faculty. While 19 PSE institutions in Canada offer graduate degrees related to management, MUN's MSc will be the only such degree offered in Atlantic Canada. A feasibility study determined that MUN's research-focused degree will help meet an unsatisfied demand of nearly 2,800 students who wish to pursue graduate studies in management.
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Atlantic universities face declining enrolment
University Affairs
In the face of a declining youth demographic and lowered enrolment numbers, Atlantic universities are looking at ways to increase enrolment. In a recent University Affairs article, Cape Breton University President David Wheeler argues the enrolment growth can be achieved by increasing the number of international students, improving retention rates, increasing graduate enrolment in certain programs, and targeting programs to the needs of the province.
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Ryerson president believes innovation can be learned
The Globe and Mail
Hidden among the glass and neon of Yonge-Dundas Square rests another major achievement of Sheldon Levy's tenure: Ryerson University's Digital Media Zone. Bustling with hundreds of entrepreneurs, nearly two-thirds of them Ryerson grads and students, the DMZ is a school-sponsored tech incubator that's birthed more than 120 companies.
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University of Waterloo visits China to strengthen bonds with research partners
Marketwired
Feridun Hamdullahpur, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Waterloo in Canada will visit China to strengthen relationships with leading Chinese universities. "It is essential that we build strong relationships with Chinese institutions as we seek to provide researchers and students with a diversity of experience and insight that is vital to the pursuit of knowledge and discovery," said Hamdullahpur.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Alberta won't support ban on temporary workers in low-skill jobs (Calgary Herald)
Windsor student wins 3-D redesign challenge (Windsor Star)
How Canadian tech can change the future of work (Tech Vibes)

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Nanotechnology ahead: Mini-robots may one day assemble medical devices inside your body
Medical Daily
New research published in Advanced Functional Materials provides some of the groundwork necessary to one day develop mini-robots that could perform delicate tasks inside your body. As the thinking goes, these nanotechnologies would be able to swim in your bloodstream and even assemble medical devices inside your body.
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Study: New patenting guidelines are needed for biotechnology
R&D Magazine
Biotechnology scientists must be aware of the broad patent landscape and push for new patent and licensing guidelines, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. Published in Regenerative Medicine, the paper is based on the June 2013 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the case Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) v. Myriad Genetics that naturally occurring genes are unpatentable. The court case and rulings garnered discussion in the public about patenting biological materials.
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NASA's space station humanoid Robonaut is finally getting legs
Canada.com
Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot — now stuck on a pedestal — is going mobile at the International Space Station.
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Fully automated mines 'a distinct possibility'
Vancouver Sun
Increasingly, the mining industry is turning to robotics. In some parts of the world, drones and driverless trucks are being used for mining operations. In B.C., most of the robotics so far are used in drilling. "Underground, we are further ahead than across Canada in terms of either using robotic or semi-autonomous-type pieces of equipment, particularly with drills," said John Thompson, the founder of PetraScience Consultants and a Chair at the Canada Mining Innovation Council.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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High-performance, low-cost ultracapacitors built with graphene and carbon nanotubes
Solid State Technology
By combining the powers of two single-atom-thick carbon structures, researchers at the George Washington University's Micro-propulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory have created a new ultracapacitor that is both high performance and low cost.

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Windsor student wins 3-D redesign challenge
Windsor Star
A Windsor, ON, student is walking away with a big win on a global scale. Marco Angione, an 18-year-old Grade 12 student at Catholic Central High School, won first place worldwide recently in the high school category of the Stratasys Extreme Redesign 3-D Printing Challenge.

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Canada's 'skills gap' is actually an 'experience gap'
Maclean's
Sophie Borwein, a researcher with the provincially funded Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, is trying to "cut through the noise" around Canada's skills-gap debate by studying what types of skills employers are actually looking for in new graduates. What she's found is that the problem facing Canada's economy isn't a lack of skills so much as an "experience gap."

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Nanotechnology researchers demonstrate potential of RNA as heat-resistant polymer material for nanoarchitectures
Nanowerk
A team of nanotechnology researchers at the University of Kentucky has discovered new methods to build heat resistant nanostructures and arrays using RNA. Chemical polymers have seen extensive use in a variety of industries — including clothing, piping, plastics, containers, bottles, cookware, tools and medical materials for drug delivery and tissue engineer materials — because of their high stability and ability to hold their global shape and size.
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Foundation for world's tallest building completed
Saudi Gazette
The Jeddah Economic Company (JEC), owner and developer of the Kingdom Tower and City in Obhor north of Jeddah, has completed the raft piling works for what could be the tallest tower in the world rising to more than 1,000 meters on an 85,000 square meter land area at more than $1.5 billion. The foundation and piling works, one of the most important and difficult stages of the project, took 12 months to complete, the JEC said.
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