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Auditor General says Canada jobs data inadequate, inaccurate
Ottawa Citizen
Federal Auditor General Michael Ferguson has criticized Canada's main survey on the country’s job openings. In a new report on Statistics Canada, Ferguson says that data cannot be relied on to provide an accurate picture for governments or the private sector. StatsCan's "Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours" is only released at the national, provincial, or territorial levels; this means that job vacancy data for smaller geographic areas are of limited value. Moreover, Ferguson said that the usefulness of the survey's classification scheme is limited by the breadth of the survey's categories. "Users informed us that as a result of these shortcomings, available information on job vacancies is of limited value to them," said Ferguson in his report. "We found that needs for data from small geographic areas and small subpopulations in specific locations are not being met." The news comes after reports emerged that a $4.6 million StatsCan survey on Canada's skills gap sits unanalyzed due to funding issues.
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CBU launches $2 million clean mining research program
CBU.ca
Cape Breton University is launching a 5-year, $2 million Green Mining Technologies Research Program, in partnership with Yava Technologies. The new program will focus on developing innovative, economical, and sustainable approaches to conventional mining practices to reduce environmental challenges. Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation (ECBC) has also committed a further $500,000 to the project for the purchase of critical specialty equipment for the commercialization of the technology. "It is imperative that we continue to work together on programs such as this. Only through collaborative efforts will we succeed in finding the numerous opportunities for innovation and ingenuity in Canada's future," said CBU President David Wheeler. Primary research and development will take place in CBU's Verschuren Centre for Sustainability in Energy and the Environment.
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Students explore their future
Midnorth Monitor
What do you want to be when you grow up? The one question everyone has been asked, pondered, and been unsure of. What better way to help guide young adults on their path to a successful and fulfilling career than giving them the opportunity to talk to those already in the field. That is what Dean Riggs, co-op teacher at Espanola High School, provides to his current and future students with the annual Career and Trade Fair.
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How myth of Canada's skills gap was shattered
Cambridge Times
It took nine months of detective work by economists, journalists, social media sleuths and investigators at the Parliamentary Budget Office to solve the mystery of Canada's missing job vacancies. Recently, auditor general Mike Ferguson made it official: the federal government was using unreliable statistics to support its claim that Canada had plenty of jobs but no workers with the skills to fill them.
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Auditor General says Canada jobs data inadequate, inaccurate
Ottawa Citizen
Federal Auditor General Michael Ferguson has criticized Canada's main survey on the country’s job openings. In a new report on Statistics Canada, Ferguson says that data cannot be relied on to provide an accurate picture for governments or the private sector. 

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Windsor student wins 3-D redesign challenge
Windsor Star
A Windsor, ON, student is walking away with a big win on a global scale. Marco Angione, an 18-year-old Grade 12 student at Catholic Central High School, won first place worldwide recently in the high school category of the Stratasys Extreme Redesign 3-D Printing Challenge.

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Canada's 'skills gap' is actually an 'experience gap'
Maclean's
Sophie Borwein, a researcher with the provincially funded Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, is trying to "cut through the noise" around Canada's skills-gap debate by studying what types of skills employers are actually looking for in new graduates. 

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Technology cuts through isolation for northern students
The Globe and Mail
Standing in front of a camera in white parkas, giggling, two Grade 6 girls at Aqsarniit Middle School take sips of water then start to sing, a guttural haunting harmony rising from their throats. On a big flat-screen TV, more than 2,500 kilometres away, a Grade 5-6 class in the tiny community of Busby, Alta., sits transfixed.
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3-D printing picks up slack from slumping manufacturing
CBC News
3-D printing is empowering a new class of entrepreneurs and could help breathe new life into Canada's manufacturing sector, experts say. 3-D products are created by printing repeated layers of material. Manufacturing expert Nigel Southway hopes Canada will start investing in the new technology.
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Sudbury company aims high with leak prevention technology
Northern Life
A spin off from a Sudbury, ON, company plans to take expertise in rubber-lined piping systems for the mining sector, and expand it to a leak prevention technology for other sectors, such as oil and gas. Jeff Fuller, the president of Fuller Industrial, teamed up with industrial designer Dan Chamberland in 2010 to develop a special paint coating for pipelines, and other structures, that could detect the smallest pin holes and prevent leaks before they happen.
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