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World's first smartphone turns 20
Global News
It's hard to argue that as our smartphones have become more sophisticated, we've come to rely on them more. So much so that it may be surprising that one of the world's first smartphone-like devices is only 20 years old. The IBM Simon "Personal Communicator" – largely regarded as the first smartphone on the market – went on sale Aug. 16, 1994. The phone was the first of its kind to feature apps and had the ability to be connected to a fax machine.
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Academic Ranking of World Universities 2014 results: Harvard takes first place
TES
Asian universities are catching up with the West on research strength, but only slowly, according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2014. The rankings, based on research prowess and compiled by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, show that mainland China in particular has improved its performance.
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Students expect to pay off loans within five years of graduation, poll show
Financial Post
Getting a post-secondary degree can be an expensive endeavour, but a recent survey suggests that most students believe they’ll be on track to pay off their student loans within five years of graduating. The poll from CIBC found that about half, or 51 per cent, of post-secondary students said they would need to borrow money to pay for tuition, living expenses and books.
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Canadian team tests new technology to harness renewable energy
CTV News
Like windmills in the water, new technology being tested in Manitoba aims to use the power of rushing rivers without building dams. “It's going to make a huge difference for small communities and medium sized communities,” said Eric Biebau, alternative energy chair with the University of Manitoba. Near Seven Sisters, the University of Manitoba runs the Canadian Hydrokinetic Turbine Test Centre.
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Sudbury technology to be tested on Mediterranean Sea
Sudbury Star
A new method of harnessing clean solar power developed in Sudbury — which could one day power mines in the Ring of Fire — will be field tested next year in the Mediterranean Sea near Malta. The Offshore Passive Photo-voltaic Project will use thin solar panels (photo-voltaic cells) floating on the water’s surface to generate energy. The array of panels, measuring about 20 meters by 20 meters, is expected to have a peak output of 8kW, enough power for two typical three-bedroom homes.
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Province pulls plug on Sydney firm's 'responsible gaming' technology
Cape Breton Post
Gaming technology firm Techlink Entertainment is reeling from the Nova Scotia government's decision to pull the plug on its responsible gambling system from video lottery terminals in the province. The Sydney-based company created the My-Play system in an attempt to change the habits of serious gamblers by storing current and past VLT player information on a card inserted into one of the machines.
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World's first smartphone turns 20
Global News
It's hard to argue that as our smartphones have become more sophisticated, we've come to rely on them more. So much so that it may be surprising that one of the world's first smartphone-like devices is only 20 years old. The IBM Simon "Personal Communicator" – largely regarded as the first smartphone on the market – went on sale Aug. 16, 1994. The phone was the first of its kind to feature apps and had the ability to be connected to a fax machine.

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Real Transformers? Self-assembling paper robots invented
CBC News
In what may be the birth of cheap, easy-to-make robots, researchers have created complex machines that transform themselves from little more than a sheet of paper and plastic into walking automatons. Borrowing from the ancient Japanese art of origami, children's toys and even a touch of the Transformers movies, scientists and engineers at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created self-assembling, paper robots.

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The rise of the helicopter teacher
The Chronicle of Higher Education
A week before the first paper was due, a young woman in my class raised her hand and asked where the rubric was. Shamefaced and stuttering, I had to admit that I had no idea what a rubric was. She helpfully explained that this was a set of guidelines explaining what I expected them to write, how I expected them to write it, and how each aspect of the paper would be evaluated.

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Mobile technology lets students create their own classrooms
The Vancouver Sun
Post-secondary students gearing up to return to the classroom will spend an increasing amount of their learning time online. A recent study by H+K Perspectives, Hill + Knowlton’s research arm, and yconic found that students report spending one third of their time doing schoolwork online. And that doesn’t include using e-textbooks, which for many of today’s students are as standard as printed texts were 10 years ago.
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Google wants to track your internet browsing, app usage to create a unified advertising platform
Canada.com
It’s happened to everyone before. You’ve just searched on eBay for some sort of item like a new television and then, a few hours later, every Google Adsense-enabled advertisement you stumble across features either that identical TV or a similar television. It doesn’t matter what site you’re browsing, the television you sat and stared at for 20 minutes, trying to decide if you really needed to buy it or not, seems to haunt your every online move, popping up in the corner of all the websites you visit.
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Car hacking is the new car jacking
Canadian Lawyer
In many respects, today’s new cars are essentially mini-computers on wheels, containing vast amounts of computer chips, sensors, and nanotechnology controlled by thousands of lines of software code. By 2017, it is estimated more than 60 per cent of cars and trucks will be connected to the Internet.
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Ottawa announces support for new space technology
The Suburban
During a recent press conference in Montreal, James Moore, Canada's Industry Minister, used the occasion to announce the government’s ongoing support for the research and development of a new space-borne Earth Observation (EO) system that will better provide the crucial data we need to better understand our planet, our nation and its resources. "Canada has a proud history in space and has long been a leader in the important and growing field of Earth observation," said the minister.
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Space plane tech could power hypersonic aircraft for U.S. military
Fox News
Engine technology being developed for a British space plane could also find its way into hypersonic aircraft built by the U.S. military. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory is studying hypersonic vehicles that would use the Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE), which the English company Reaction Engines is working on to power the Skylon space plane, AFRL officials said.
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Technology helps pilots land in fog
The Wall Street Journal
Rockwell Collins and other cockpit-equipment makers are developing technologies to combat a major source of frustration for airline passengers: flights that are canceled or diverted due to poor visibility at their scheduled destinations. Using computer-generated color images, and sometimes infrared-enhanced views of runways and their surroundings, Rockwell, Honeywell International and other suppliers are seeking to reduce such schedule disruptions and lost revenue for carriers.
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4 groundbreaking technologies certain to make sports more fun
Yahoo!
When it comes to sports, teams and athletes are always looking for that competitive edge. That’s why new inventions and technologies are regularly put into play to improve the overall sports experience. And sometimes when geeks get tinkering, some interesting, out-of-the-box innovations can come about.
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Preventing a dangerous race to the bottom in biotechnology
Forbes
There is a current debate surrounding whether to allow differential naming of similar biologic products. If Coke and Pepsi both had to be sold as Copsi, there would be reduced incentives for the two firms to try to make their version of the generic product, cola, something consumers liked better than the competitor's version. Likewise, not allowing branding of similar biologic products will lead to a race to the bottom in their overall quality that has the potential to be very dangerous to U.S. patients.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Kitchener robotics company backs campaign against killer robots (The Record)
Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation invests $3 million in Study North initiative (Ministry of Northern Development and Mines via Confederation College)
Mobile technology keeps lions, intruders off African farms (QR Code Press)
Some of the internet's coolest new businesses are based on a technology older than the web (Quartz)

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