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Minister Moore reinforces need for open and efficient trade in Canada
Government of Canada
Industry Minister James Moore addressed the Alberta Enterprise Group's Forging Partnerships conference about the Harper Government's commitment to breaking down internal trade barriers that harm the national economy and hurt Canadian businesses, workers and consumers. During his address, Minister Moore outlined One Canada, One National Economy: Modernizing Internal Trade in Canada, the federal proposal to update the current Agreement on Internal Trade. It was developed following Minister Moore's recent national dialogue with Canadian businesses, workers and consumers, during which he heard first-hand how these barriers impede trade and deter competition in our national economy.
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CTAB Applied Research/Capstone Project Contest 2014 — Finalists
Lorry Fortin — CTAB Staff
BCIT
1. Simple Switch Interfacing Device
Cambrian College -ON
2. Design of Sanitary and Storm Sewers for Twin Lakes Subdivision
3. Implementing a Ventilation on Demand System
Camosun College -BC
4. AGS Robotics
NBCC
5. Irrigation Pump Control System
6. Stress Analysis Sump-Pump
NSCC
7. A Harvestless Cell Viability Assessment Device for in-vitro Diagnostics
SAIT- AB
8. Dry Land Bobsleigh Braking System
Selkirk College -BC
9. Impacts of urbanization on fish and fish habitat in lower Cottonwood Creek in Nelson, BC
10. Village of Slocan OCP Implementation Plan

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Survey: More Canadians have post-secondary education than other OECD nations
Toronto Star
More Canadian adults have a post-secondary education than any other country in the developed world, largely because of our robust system of community colleges, says a new survey of global education. And Canada does a better job than many countries at helping low-income kids in public school overcome hurdles to learning, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in its sweeping report, Education At a Glance.
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Windsor company aims to make roads safer with technology
CBC News
A Windsor-based company is standing out at a large auto-technology conference taking place in Detroit. Praveen Singh, is the CEO of Arada Systems, a company that makes special computerized systems that can better direct motorists. The technology connects drivers, pedestrians and intersections by mounting the computerized systems on traffic lights and inside vehicles so they can navigate streets more effectively.
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Alcatel-Lucent exec: 5G should not be a technology dumping ground
FierceWirelessTech
Michael Peeters, wireless CTO at Alcatel-Lucent, is getting frustrated with the industry's approach to 5G, which he contends is getting everything but the kitchen sink dumped into it. In a keynote address at the Towers & Small Cell Summit, part of CTIA's Super Mobility Week, Peeters said companies are throwing into 5G pretty much everything that was not included in earlier technology evolutions, with examples including massive MIMO, machine-to-machine (M2M) and millimeter-wave technologies.
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Canadian startups are using drone technology to spot new business opportunities
Financial Post
Across its various plants, McCain Foods is capable of pumping out a million pounds of French fries an hour. In all, McCain makes one-third of all the world’s frozen fries. That production requires a huge amount of potatoes, which McCain draws from both its corporate farms and independent growers. Those farms cover great swaths of acreage, including in the potato country around Florenceville, N.B., where McCain opened its first plant in 1957.
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Survey: More Canadians have post-secondary education than other OECD nations
Toronto Star
More Canadian adults have a post-secondary education than any other country in the developed world, largely because of our robust system of community colleges, says a new survey of global education. And Canada does a better job than many countries at helping low-income kids in public school overcome hurdles to learning, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in its sweeping report, Education At a Glance.

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Apple poised to supercharge mobile payments
Internet Retailer
With biometric and NFC technologies—not to mention the big three credit card companies—on board, Apple may provide the spark that (finally) lights a mobile payments fire, enabling consumers to pay in stores with their iPhones. And merchants may not need new POS terminals, one expert suggests. Like Apple or not, its innovations define the mobile realm. It is not a trendsetter, it is the trendsetter.

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Canadian drilling pioneer's technology gains worldwide recognition
Northern Ontario Business
Persistence paid off for Ray Roussy. It's been a 40-year odyssey for the Smooth Rock Falls native, mechanical engineer and innovator who's being recognized for nursing a once-discarded commercial drilling technology back to life. Roussy is a pioneer in sonic drilling, a revolutionary and century-old system that's gaining worldwide acceptance as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional drilling systems.

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Intel's RealSense tech offers glimpse at future of mobile cameras
CNET
Snapping touristy shots with a tablet is a modern day taboo, but that may change for users of Dell's Venue 8 7000 series. The device — the thinnest tablet in the world at 6 millimeters — is fast and flashy and feels great running the latest version of Google's Android mobile operating system.
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Self-parking technology is here, but other hurdles remain
Waterloo Region Record
With a thumb swipe on a smartphone, your car one day will be able to drive into a parking deck, find an open spot and back into a space — all by itself. Technology being honed by French auto parts maker Valeo uses a dozen ultrasonic sound-wave sensors, 360-degree cameras and a laser scanner to safely park within a few centimetres of other vehicles. Then, when you're done with dinner or a business meeting, the car will return to you after another swipe of the thumb.
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Nanotechnology to provide cleaner diesel engines
R&D Magazine
It may seem paradoxical that a rare precious metal such as platinum is used in something as simple as smoky truck exhaust systems—nonetheless, this has always been a fundamental technological principle. When it comes to diesel engine catalysts—i.e. the element responsible for cleansing exhaust fumes particles—platinum has unfortunately proved to be the only viable option, which has resulted in material costs alone accounting for half of the price of a diesel catalyst.
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Team uses nanotechnology to help cool electrons with no external sources
Phys.org
A team of researchers has discovered a way to cool electrons to −228 °C without external means and at room temperature, an advancement that could enable electronic devices to function with very little energy. The process involves passing electrons through a quantum well to cool them and keep them from heating.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The race to capture solar energy at U of T (CBC News)
Survey: One-third of Canadian workers see technology as a threat to their job (Yahoo)
U.K.: Costcutter adopts 'scan, bag and go' mobile payment technology (FreshPlaza)
Nanotechnology researchers improve mechanical properties of ceramics (Nanowerk News)
The race to capture solar energy at U of T (CBC News)
The iPhone 6's NFC chip: what can it do? (Top Tech News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Google buys high-tech spoon maker, expands health care focus
Reuters
Google has acquired the maker of a high-tech spoon that helps people suffering from neurodegenerative tremors to eat, the Internet company's latest foray into the health care and biotechnology market. The company is joining the Google[x] division, which focuses on projects such as self-driving cars and drones and which has a Life Sciences group, Google said
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5 things the Apple Watch can and can't do
InfoWorld
Apple's latest "one more thing" was a doozy: A high-tech watch that CEO Tim Cook hopes will "redefine what people expect" from a wearable device. The watch does much more than tell the time — but what exactly does it do? And what can't it? The $350 Apple Watch is meant to be worn throughout the day and relies on its connection to an iPhone for much of its functionality. It can track health activity, communicate with friends and run a wide range of apps. It can even make retail payments.
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Layered graphene sandwich for next generation electronics
Nanotechnology Now
Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), otherwise known as white graphene, is one of a family of two-dimension materials discovered in the wake of the isolation of graphene at the University in 2004. Manchester researchers have previously demonstrated how combining 2-D materials, in stacks called heterostructures, could lead to materials capable of being designed to meet industrial demands. Now, for the first time, the team has demonstrated that the electronic behaviour of the heterostructures can be changed enormously by precisely controlling the orientation of the crystalline layers within the stacks.
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Mobile technology war continues between Apple and Samsung
QR Code Press
The battle for the product ban continues despite the fact that a federal judge has ruled to the contrary. Even though a ruling made by a federal judge has stated that the mobile technology product infringements by Samsung should not ban that company from producing them, Apple still feels differently and is escalating its efforts to try to block that competitor from continuing with those offerings.
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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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