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The neuroscience of search engines
Salon
In 1964, Pablo Picasso was asked by an interviewer about the new electronic calculating machines, soon to become known as computers. He replied, “But they are useless. They can only give you answers.” We live in the age of answers. The ancient library at Alexandria was believed to hold the world’s entire store of knowledge. Today, there is enough information in the world for every person alive to be given three times as much as was held in Alexandria’s entire collection —and nearly all of it is available to anyone with an internet connection.
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Poodle: SSL 3.0 bug is the newest threat to web security
CBC News
Three Google Inc researchers have uncovered a security bug in widely used web encryption technology that they say could allow hackers to take over accounts for email, banking and other services in what they have dubbed a "Poodle" attack. The discovery of Poodle, which stands for Padding Oracle On Downloaded Legacy Encryption, prompted makers of web browsers and server software to advise users on Tuesday to disable use of the source of the security bug: an 18-year old encryption standard known as SSL 3.0.
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Boats, trains, planes: How technology is making old transportation new again
Financial Post
If innovation in the automotive industry had kept apace with innovation in the computer industry, the joke goes, we would all be driving $25 cars that got 1,000 miles to the gallon but, for no reason at all, crashed twice a day. Not strictly factual, to be sure, but it does draw attention to the ways in which transportation has — and hasn’t — evolved since the advent of the microchip, the Internet and every other technological breakthrough that has transformed the way we live and do business.
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Rise of 'voiceprint' ID technology has privacy campaigners concerned
The Guardian
The rapid deployment by governments and businesses of voiceprint technology – used to identify people from their speech – has aroused the concern of privacy groups who see it as a possible next frontline in the battle against overweening public surveillance. A survey by the Associated Press of voice biometrics, the spoken equivalent of fingerprints, has found that the technology is already widely used. The AP estimated that more than 65 million voiceprints have been stored in corporate and government databases around the world.
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The neuroscience of search engines
Salon
In 1964, Pablo Picasso was asked by an interviewer about the new electronic calculating machines, soon to become known as computers. He replied, “But they are useless. They can only give you answers.” We live in the age of answers. The ancient library at Alexandria was believed to hold the world’s entire store of knowledge. Today, there is enough information in the world for every person alive to be given three times as much as was held in Alexandria’s entire collection —and nearly all of it is available to anyone with an internet connection.

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Google Maps unveils new panoramic views of Canada's iconic landmarks
CTV News
Google Maps has unveiled new street views of some of Canada's most iconic landmarks and parks from coast to coast, giving curious viewers a chance to virtually visit the different destinations. The company unveiled the new street views in a blog post. Some of the new locations include B.C.'s Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Alberta's Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump and Hopewell Rocks Provincial Park in New Brunswick.

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Heat seeker: Meet the thermal-imaging camera you can afford
CNET
If you want to try to find a water leak behind a wall, a person hidden in the bushes at night, or identify passengers with a fever passing through a checkpoint, thermal imaging is the technology for you. But until now, that was only if you've got a very big budget. Cameras equipped with the technology — which measures differences in temperature on the electromagnetic spectrum — have long been too expensive for everyday use. Most cost well over $1,000, if not double, or triple that.

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Google tests ultra high-speed wireless Internet technology
ZDNet
Google is seeking FCC permission to test new technology which could marry the speed of Google Fiber to wireless services. In an application to the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the tech giant requested permission to conduct tests in California across wireless spectrums. Of particular interest, as noted by Reuters, is a rarely used millimeter-wave frequency that is capable of transmitting vast amounts of information across the air.
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Intel preps new technology to secure credit card transactions
Computerworld
Swiping credit cards or using payment systems like Apple Pay at stores could become much safer thanks to a new Intel system, which could also make it easier for retailers to secure data after transactions are completed. With security breaches and customer data theft on the rise, Intel has developed Data Protection Technology for Transactions, a hardware-software bundle designed to protect credit card and personal data from hackers when transactions are being authorized.
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Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting
Phys.org
Princeton University researchers have developed a new method to increase the brightness, efficiency and clarity of LEDs, which are widely used on smartphones and portable electronics as well as becoming increasingly common in lighting. Using a new nanoscale structure, the researchers, led by electrical engineering professor Stephen Chou, increased the brightness and efficiency of LEDs made of organic materials (flexible carbon-based sheets) by 58 per cent.
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How nanotechnology could re-engineer us
Humanity+
Nanotechnology is an important new area of research that promises significant advances in electronics, materials, biotechnology, alternative energy sources, and dozens of other applications. The graphic below illustrates, at a personal level, the potential impact on each of us. And where electrical measurement is required, Keithley instrumentation is being used in an expanding list of nanotechnology research and development settings.
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Powerful quantum computers move a step closer to reality
The Guardian
Researchers at the University of New South Wales have pushed quantum computers a step closer to reality, which one former NSA technical director says calls for a rethink in how the whole security of the internet is managed. The Australian researchers claim to have developed two new types of quantum bits, or "qubits", that can perform operations with accuracy above 99 per cent.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dow donates $1 million to NAIT applied technologies (Edmonton Journal)
Mounties love their drone technology; finding even more uses (Edmonton Sun)
How technology is transforming the cosmetics industry (The Telegraph)
After eBay, HP, Symantec may be next in line for a split (ZDNet)
FireChat 'off-the-grid' messaging app: What you need to know (CBC News)
Canada greenlights e-labelling for devices, Report (Canada Journal)

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Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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