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Study: Skilled worker shortage no myth
Meridian Booster
A recent TD Bank economic report on labour trends is being challenged, specifically the claim that within the next decade Canada should not expect a significant deficit in terms of labour force to jobs. For many sectors, this is a reality, but some feel it over looks the construction sector. Rosemary Sparks, executive director of Build Force Canada, says that the report takes the current and increasingly poor state of labour shortages far too lightly
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Labour market demands a national education strategy
The Globe and Mail
Employers say they can't fill one in five positions in Canada because the candidates don’t have the right skills to do the jobs. Yet more than half of all Canadians hold a university or college degree, diploma or certificate, more than any other country in the 34-nation Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.
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Robot detects breast cancer with space-grade technology
Fox News
The same technology designed for huge robotic arms that help astronauts in space is being brought back to Earth to do some heavy lifting in cancer treatment — in the form of a surgical robot. Its inventors say the robot could take breast biopsies with remarkable precision and consistency. The new machine is called IGAR, which is short for Image-Guided Autonomous Robot.
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Scientists rethinking meteor impact risk thanks to YouTube videos
The Globe and Mail
Call it astronomy by YouTube. Unprecedented social media documentation of a small asteroid exploding over a Russian city has taught scientists much more about how — and how often — such spectacular events happen. In one of three scientific papers on the Chelyabinsk meteor published, a University of Western Ontario scientist concludes that the heavenly bodies are hitting the Earth two or three times more often than we thought.
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Google: Mystery barge may become interactive learning space
CBC News
Internet giant Google says it is exploring using a large barge as an interactive learning centre. A statement released from Google's press centre may help end weeks of speculation about the purpose of structures on two barges, one being built in the San Francisco Bay, another off Portland, Maine.
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A history of biotechnology in 7 objects
Smithsonian.com
Until 1982, anyone who used insulin to manage their diabetes got it from what we'd now think of as an unusual source — the pancreases of cows and pigs, harvested from slaughterhouses and shipped en masse to pharmaceutical processing plants. But there were problems with getting all our insulin this way — fluctuations in the meat market affected the price of the drug, and projected increases in the number of diabetic people made scientists worry that shortfalls in insulin supply could strike within the next few decades.
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How nanotechnology can advance regenerative medicine
Digital Journal
Nanotechnology may provide new strategies for regenerative medicine, including better tools to improve or restore damaged tissues, according to a review paper by Taiwanese researchers. Published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, the paper summarizes the current state of knowledge on nanotechnology with application to stem cell biology.
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Study: Skilled worker shortage no myth
Meridian Booster
A recent TD Bank economic report on labour trends is being challenged, specifically the claim that within the next decade Canada should not expect a significant deficit in terms of labour force to jobs. For many sectors, this is a reality, but some feel it over looks the construction sector.

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Medical pioneer mourns commercialization of science
Toronto Star
Hart House Theatre was packed for the announcement of the 2013 Siminovitch Prize recently. The artistic community was buzzing. The $10,000 Siminovitch Prize, now in its 13th year, is one of the richest and most prestigious cultural awards in the country.

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Wearable technology hits the mainstream
Straight.com
Parveen Kaler sits as much as 10 hours a day. Aware of the health risks associated with spending so much time being stationary, Kaler wanted a way to make sure he was keeping active when he wasn't working on his computer. So he bought a Fitbit.

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Quality control and development of advanced textiles using atomic force microscopy
AZ Nano
A range of applications such as healthcare, defense and consumer goods are using advanced textiles. Latest manufacturing techniques allow fabrics to get functional with added properties such as bacterial resistance, sweat resistance, and water resistance. High performance textiles extend beyond apparel with industrial applications ranging from automobile to building construction.
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Edith O'Donnell Arts and Technology building transforms architectural dynamic of campus
UT Dallas
Since its inception in 2004, the Arts and Technology (ATEC) program at UT Dallas has infused new energy into the traditional liberal arts by creating connections between science and engineering and the arts and humanities. Now, the program's new infrastructure — the Edith O'Donnell Arts and Technology Building — has transformed the architectural dynamic of the campus itself.
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