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CTAB 2013-2014
Canadian Technology Accreditation Board

The Canadian Technology Accreditation Board (CTAB) held a very successful meeting in Ottawa on Oct. 25-26, 2013. According to Cathy Cardy, Chair 2013 was "the busiest year ever for Triennial Reviews and I can report that the Board is extremely pleased with the results." Five new international programs are on the schedule for Spring 2014 along with 11 new program application in Canada. CTAB is pleased to welcome Mr. Errol Persaud, PEng (NBCC) representing the National Council of Deans of Technology and Mr. Tom Sutton, PEng representing the Canadian Society for Chemical Technology.
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RRC to get new trades and technology centre
RRC
The Honourable Philip S. Lee, Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Manitoba, delivered the annual Throne Speech yesterday, highlighting the province’s efforts to improve PSE. As part of the strategy to improve skills training, Manitoba pledges to: "enhance and streamline tax credits for employers to hire more apprentices and grow their labour force; provide new tools to help match apprentices to job openings, helping more apprentices begin their careers and complete their training program; and introduce new legislation to ensure apprenticeship opportunities on all major government supported building projects."

Lee also announced plans to establish a new state-of the-art Skilled Trades and Technology Centre that will be housed at Red River College's Notre Dame Campus. The new centre will accommodate approximately 1,000 new students per year. Lee also spoke to recent improvements at other Manitoba PSE institutions, including the University of Winnipeg's new RecPlex, and expansions to University College of the North campuses in Thompson and Norway House. Manitoba News Release | RRC News

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SAIT's applied research programs get top funding
The Globe and Mail
Canada's colleges have been experiencing a surge in funding for applied research projects, jumping to $216 million in applied research funding for 2011-2012 from $132 million in 2008-2009. SAIT Polytechnic topped the list of colleges receiving funding for applied research in 2012, according to Research Infosource Inc's inaugural rankings of Canada's Top 50 Research Colleges. "Colleges are not trying to compete with universities. They are trying to complement them," says Ron Freedman, CEO of Research Infosource. "They're not so interested in academic research that leads to publication... they are interested in practical, applied research that will help the prospects of an individual company or non-profit organization or government department."

SAIT conducts 30 to 50 applied research projects a year, and in the past 5 years has developed more than 250 prototypes. There are several advantages to applied research programs, including hands-on experiential learning for students, an "injection of youthful expertise and energy” for companies, and, for government agencies, the ability to fund "promising research that might have widespread benefits."

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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Skilled worker shortage no myth (Meridian Booster)
Labour market demands a national education strategy (The Globe and Mail)
Google: Mystery barge may become interactive learning space (CBC News)

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IT skills gap hurts productivity
CBC News
Canadian business executives say the skills gap in information technology is affecting their productivity and ability to engage with customers, according to a survey by information technology industry association CompTIA. CompTIA, an international training organization that surveyed businesses in 10 countries, found that 38 per cent of Canadian executives say an IT skills gap is hurting staff productivity.
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Kenney tells business leaders to raise wages to solve skills shortages
The Vancouver Sun
Employers must "put more skin in the game" to solve Canada's skilled worker shortage by increasing wages and investing in skills training, federal Employment Minister Jason Kenney told a Vancouver business crowd. "The single most powerful tool employers have to address labour skill shortages is raising wage levels," Kenney said at the B.C. Business Summit.
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Miners partner with colleges to graduate skilled workers
The Globe and Mail
Despite being at the forefront of Canada's job growth over the past three years, the mining sector will not be able to grow at its full potential in the next decade because of a lack of trained workers, those in the industry say. The resources industry has begun to work closely with governments, colleges and universities to try to address the looming shortage it fears.
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Can we do a better job teaching entrepreneurship in Canada?
Financial Post
Earlier this year, EY's G20 Entrepreneurship Barometer scored Canada below the average among G20 countries for entrepreneurial education and informal education. The study's authors specifically noted that, "too few education and training-related efforts focus specifically on the needs of entrepreneurs." This should be cause for concern.
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Conservatives failing on skills training
Northumberland View
Provinces, experts and even the Canadian Chamber of Commerce have joined together to criticize the Conservative government's interference in provincial skills training programs — programs that are already working very well according to independent studies. "You would think the government would understand, if it's not broke don’t fix it. But once again Conservatives are ignoring experts and stakeholders with their one-sided approach," said Employment and Social Development critic Jinny Sims.
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Silver nanoparticle use spurs U.S. consumer database
CBC News
The antibacterial superpowers of silver nanoparticles have landed them in household products ranging from self-sanitizing toothbrushes and washing machines to mold- and bacteria-resistant stuffed toys and underwear. These microscopic particles have become ubiquitous, but some are also questioning their risks. As a result, a U.S. research group has launched a public database to help people identify products containing silver and other nanoparticles.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Skilled worker shortage no myth
Meridian Booster
A recent TD Bank economic report on labour trends is being challenged, specifically the claim that within the next decade Canada should not expect a significant deficit in terms of labour force to jobs. For many sectors, this is a reality, but some feel it over looks the construction sector.

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Medical pioneer mourns commercialization of science
Toronto Star
Hart House Theatre was packed for the announcement of the 2013 Siminovitch Prize recently. The artistic community was buzzing. The $10,000 Siminovitch Prize, now in its 13th year, is one of the richest and most prestigious cultural awards in the country.

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Wearable technology hits the mainstream
Straight.com
Parveen Kaler sits as much as 10 hours a day. Aware of the health risks associated with spending so much time being stationary, Kaler wanted a way to make sure he was keeping active when he wasn't working on his computer. So he bought a Fitbit.

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Industry asked for technologies to detect and counter chemical and biological weapons
Military & Aerospace
U.S. government researchers are asking industry to nominate technologies to demonstrate their potential to detect, predict, and counter threats of chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction. Officials of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Director of Defense Research and Engineering, in Arlington, VA, has issued a notice for the Thunderstorm Technology Demonstration program.
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Edith O'Donnell Arts and Technology building transforms architectural dynamic of campus
UT Dallas
Since its inception in 2004, the Arts and Technology (ATEC) program at UT Dallas has infused new energy into the traditional liberal arts by creating connections between science and engineering and the arts and humanities. Now, the program's new infrastructure — the Edith O'Donnell Arts and Technology Building — has transformed the architectural dynamic of the campus itself.
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