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Rewiring senses: Technologies enable humans to hear colour, smell time
CBC News
It's common knowledge that most humans have five senses. But, some people are attempting to rewire those fundamentals into more interesting experiences — like seeing with your tongue and listening to music with your teeth. "The brain is plastic and we can definitely tap into the higher sensory processes through other sensory stimuli," says Aisen Caro Chacin, an artist, researcher and university professor.
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Poll: Nearly half of Canadian web users now streaming music, most using mobile
Daily Courier
Almost half of all Canadian Internet users say they now stream music online, according to the results of a newly released survey. About 43 per cent of the 1,000 Canadians polled online by Google in October said they sometimes streamed music, and nearly half of them said they typically used their smartphone to do so. About four in 10 of them said they sometimes used their computer to stream music and just six per cent said they sometimes used a tablet.
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How the mobile revolution is reshaping R&D budgets in Vancouver
Business in Vancouver
Take a look at smartphones developed by Google or Apple and you’ll encounter almost complete market dominance. “Neither one of them invented smartphones,” said Alexander Fernandes. “But where’s PalmPilot, where’s BlackBerry, where’s Nokia these days? They’ve fallen by the wayside because they failed to innovate.” The CEO of Avigilon said the rapid changes in the tech sector means budgeting for research and development requires a deft touch.
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3-D-printed car has just 49 parts
Chatham Daily News
Meet the Strati: a car with just 49 parts that can be 3-D printed in 24 hours. Phoenix, AZ-based Local Motors, which describes itself as a platform where anyone can "design, build and sell the world's coolest machines," rolled out its first 3-D printed car at the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago. It was printed and assembled on site in 44 hours using a process called direct digital manufacturing, (DDM), then took its first test-drive around the conference centre.
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How the mobile revolution is reshaping R&D budgets in Vancouver
Business in Vancouver
Take a look at smartphones developed by Google or Apple and you’ll encounter almost complete market dominance. “Neither one of them invented smartphones,” said Alexander Fernandes. “But where’s PalmPilot, where’s BlackBerry, where’s Nokia these days? They’ve fallen by the wayside because they failed to innovate.” The CEO of Avigilon said the rapid changes in the tech sector means budgeting for research and development requires a deft touch.

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Recharge your phone in 30 seconds?
Canoe.ca
An Israeli company says it has developed technology that can charge a mobile phone in a few seconds and an electric car in minutes, advances that could transform two of the world's most dynamic consumer industries. Using nano-technology to synthesize artificial molecules, Tel Aviv-based StoreDot says it has developed a battery that can store a much higher charge more quickly, in effect acting like a super-dense sponge to soak up power and retain it.

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Low-cost technology to produce clean hydrogen fuel
Times of India
In a thrust to "artificial leaf" technology, a team of scientists have reported a significant progress toward a stand-alone system that lends itself to large-scale, low-cost production. The "artificial leaf" technology is a green approach to make hydrogen fuel that copies plants' ability to convert sunlight into a form of energy they can use.

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Google brings museums to mobile users, armchair travelers with new technology platform
TechCrunch
Google announced today it’s making a platform available to museums that enables them to build mobile applications that take advantage of Google technology, including Street View and YouTube, to bring their exhibits to anyone with a smartphone. Through partnerships between museums worldwide and the Google Cultural Institute, there are now 11 museums and cultural institutions that have participated in this pilot project to date; their apps are live now on Google Play.
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New technology will triple the speed of wireless charging
TechRadar
Wireless charging is a convenient way of topping up your device's battery, and new technology is on the way to make it even better. At the moment it can take quite a while to fully charge batteries via a wireless charger as the technology can only run at a rate of 5 Watts.
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Symantec: Hackers are getting personal information easier than before
Computer Dealer News
In the mobile app world, when hackers want access to personal information, they need simply ask. This is one of several key findings Symantec Corp. released today as part of the company’s “Mobile App Security” study. Conducted during a two weeks period in October, the study surveyed more than 6,000 smartphone users in Canada and the U.S., as well as other regions such as Australia, Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, and the U.K.
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Web founder: Net is 'less free and more unequal'
BBC
The web is becoming less free and more unequal, according to a report from the World Wide Web Foundation. Its annual web index suggests web users are at increasing risk of government surveillance, with laws preventing mass snooping weak or non-existent in over 84% of countries.
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Now you can change all your passwords automatically
ZDNet
Back in June, in the wake of the Heartbleed bug, I called for some sort of system to allow users to change passwords on a service automatically. My wish has mostly come true. Recently, password manager company Dashlane announced a system for automatic changes of passwords. They have a list of sites for which the feature works. At the moment, the page has 78 sites.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Cheaper smartphones gain popularity among consumers (CBC News)
USC digital technology creates first 3-D portraits of Obama (USC)
Lighting it up: Sporting venues transition to LED technology (Triple Pundit)
Alberta Roadbuilders and Heavy Construction Association gives $35,000 to Lethbridge College to support civil engineering technology students (Lethbridge College)

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