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Table of Contents
  • Colorado community faces 'a marathon' of trauma recovery
  • EAPA task force to develop EA Specialist Certificate for network affiliate providers
  • Accommodating mental disabilities: The 5 key Q&As
  • Traction seen for defined contribution health plans, private insurance exchanges
  • How damaging is a bad boss, exactly?
  • Overlooked, ignored or feared – mental disabilities
  • What are Americans doing on vacation? Working
  • Should woman have received disability benefits for depression?
  • Expansion of several federal employee benefits to same-sex partners planned
  • Stressful jobs may hurt the female heart



  • Colorado community faces 'a marathon' of trauma recovery
    USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    As authorities in Aurora, Colo., notified families that their loved ones were killed in the midnight movie theater shooting, that pain will radiate to friends, neighbors, classmates, co-workers and on to strangers who identify with young folks out to have fun at a hot new flick, say mental health experts and clergy. Kathie Snell, deputy director of child and family services at Aurora Mental Health Center, said that hundreds already had called their crisis hotline, visited their 24-hour walk-in center at Viewpoint Plaza Center or sought help at schools where the center, the Red Cross and others are offering help. More

    EAPA task force to develop EA Specialist Certificate for network affiliate providers
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    EAPA is assembling a panel to develop an EA Specialist Certificate training program for EA network affiliate providers. The panel will design and develop a certificate program for licensed mental health professionals who provide services for employee assistance programs as part of EA affiliate networks. The panel will be comprised of seven to nine subject matter experts who are currently responsible for EAP network development for small, medium-sized and large EAPs. More



    Accommodating mental disabilities: The 5 key Q&As
    Business Management Daily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Are you prepared for questions like these: A top-performing employee is diagnosed with depression and now says her medication makes it impossible for her to get to work on time. Must you change her work schedule? An applicant voluntarily informs you that he is intellectually disabled, but says he can perform his job with a job coach. Is that a "reasonable" accommodation? More

    Traction seen for defined contribution health plans, private insurance exchanges
    Employee Benefit News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Federal health care reform legislation and the desire of employers to limit their health insurance costs are likely to fuel interest in "defined contribution" health benefits and private health insurance exchanges, according to a new report by the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute. EBRI says a combination of insurance market reforms, especially the health exchange structure in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as well as rising health costs, have brought a renewed focus on limiting employer's health care cost exposure. More

    How damaging is a bad boss, exactly?
    Harvard Business Review (blog)    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    What's the one factor that most affects how satisfied, engaged and committed employees are at work? All of our research over the years points to one answer — and that's the answer to the question: "Who is the immediate supervisor?" Quite simply, the better the leader, the more engaged the staff. More

    Overlooked, ignored or feared — mental disabilities
    HR Daily Advisor    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    One overlooked, ignored, and/or feared area of the Americans with Disabilities Act is dealing with employees who suffer from mental disabilities, say attorneys Julie K. Athey and Audra K. Hamilton. Because many mental disabilities are hard to spot, hard to diagnose, and hard to handle, employers may either give too much attention (fear, stigma, termination) or too little, pretending they don’t exist. More

    What are Americans doing on vacation? Working
    HR Morning    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    You give employees vacation time so they can kick back, relax and come back to work refreshed and more productive. Well, that's not what's happening. More than half (52 percent) of U.S. adults are planning to work while they're on vacation. More

    Should woman have received disability benefits for depression?
    Human Resources Journal    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    A woman working for BellSouth Telecommunications, a subsidiary of AT&T, alleged that her former employer violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing her paid time off for depression. She took her case to court, where she argued that her depression is a disability as defined by the ADA standards. More

    Expansion of several federal employee benefits to same-sex partners planned
    The Washington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Same-sex domestic partners would become eligible for several types of benefits for family members of federal employees under rules set for publication. The rules, which have been in proposed status for a year or more, carry out 2009 and 2010 orders from President Barack Obama to extend federal employee benefits to those partners within the limits of existing law. More

    Stressful jobs may hurt the female heart
    Medpage Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    Women who have a lot of stress at work appear to have a greater cardiovascular risk than those with lower-stress jobs, an analysis of the Women's Health Study showed. Both active jobs and those with a high level of strain were associated with a 38 percent greater relative risk of having a cardiovascular event through 10 years of follow-up, according to Michelle Albert, MD, MPH, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues. More


     



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