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IAPSC NEWS

IAPSC hosts successful seminar at ASIS, educates future security consultants
IAPSC
Under the leadership of Rich Grassie, IAPSC members David Aggleton, John White, Jim Clark, Alan Brockbank, David Duda and Chad Callaghan presented the IAPSC's Successful Security Consulting pre-seminar at ASIS, an introductory workshop on how to launch and run a security consulting practice. This annual program continues to be one of the most popular pre-seminars and exceeded attendance goals again this year. IAPSC looks forward to offering this seminar again at ASIS 2015 in Anaheim, CA. For more information about IAPSC educational programs, or to get involved, contact iapsc@iapsc.org.
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Members gather in Atlanta, spread the word about IAPSC
IAPSC
IAPSC members gathered the evening before the ASIS 2014 Seminar to enjoy cocktails and hors d’oeuvres and network with invited guests who were looking to learn more about the Association. During the following two days, many members showed their pride by volunteering at the IAPSC membership booth. Thanks to all who participated and a special thank you to RS2 Technologies for their support of the reception.
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The prescription for effective healthcare security
IAPSC
Security Expert John M. White, CPP, CHPA, President/CEO of Protection Management, LLC was recently published in a White Paper titled "The Prescription for Effective Healthcare Security." To read the White Paper, follow this link to Security Consultant News.
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Texas Attorney General's opinion on PI license for expert witnesses
IAPSC
Section 1702.130 of the Texas Occupations Code defines an investigator as one who, among other things, "engages in the business of securing, or accepts employment to secure, evidence for use before a court ..." However, the mere fact that a person is testifying, even as an expert, is not dispositive, since the proposed testimony might not be based on an investigation. For instance, the review of evidence exclusively provided or obtained by licensed investigators, or testimony in court related to such evidence, does not require licensure. Such review would not constitute "securing evidence," but rather the review of previously secured evidence. The department would suggest that the "evidence" in question must be the result of an investigation. However, individuals who conduct an investigation in order to secure evidence for use while testifying in court as an expert witness would be required by Section 1702.130 to obtain a license.
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2015 brings IAPSC back to Napa, CA
IAPSC
Mark your calendar for the IAPSC Annual Conference, the largest and most exclusive gathering of top security consultants, on Sunday, April 19-Wednesday, April 22, 2015 at the Meritage Resort & Spa in Napa, California. Conference planning is already underway, led by Committee Chair Lynda Buel, CPP, CFE, CSC and registration is set to open later this year. Download the flyer for more information.
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Security veterans Bonnie Michelman and Lt. Sam Hood to kick off Secured Cities — Keynote focuses on public and private partnership challenges and strategies
IAPSC
Secured Cities officially kicks-off on Wednesday, Nov. 5, at 9 a.m. with respected security veterans Bonnie Michelman, Director of Police, Security and Outside Services at Mass General Hospital in Boston, and Lt. Sam Hood, Director of Law Enforcement Operation for the City of Baltimore’s CitiWatch, open with timely remarks.

Michelman will touch on challenges of a successful private/public partnerships initiatives and preview her afternoon session related to the aftermath of 2013's Boston Marathon bombing tragedy. Lt. Hood will discuss Baltimore's collaborative p3 initiatives and event security.

Cisco will also be hosting a 90-minute "Thought Leadership Series" on Wednesday, Nov. 5 following the cocktail reception from 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m., with its extensive Public Safety and Safe Cities initiatives featured in exclusive interactive programs. All attendees are invited to join this very special educational opportunity. For more information and to register visit SecuredCities.com.

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TRAVEL & TRANSPORTATION


Tomorrow's best airport security is already in your face
Skift
Advancements in biometric technology won't revolutionize travel, they already have. What awaits us is further enhancement, greater sophistication, and ultimate invisibility. Human Recognition Systems, experts in biometric technology, who work with leading airports around the world, predict that in the very near-term future airport security will be invisible — and right in your face. Successful trials of advanced distance iris, gait and facial recognition systems have already been deployed, including two key programs at London Gatwick.
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GOVERNMENT


Forecasting the future for technology and policing
Government Technology
In 2010, just as the recession's wave of fiscal calamity was peaking, George Bascom and Todd Foglesong, from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, published a report, Making Policing More Affordable. They pointed out that public expenditures on policing had more than quadrupled between 1982 and 2006. But with city budget shortfalls opening up across the country, police departments and their chiefs, once used to ever-growing budgets, were now facing a new reality of cutbacks, layoffs and even outright mergers and consolidations of entire police departments with others.
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9/11 terrorists caught testing airport security months before attacks
New York Post
At least three eyewitnesses spotted al Qaeda hijackers casing the security checkpoints at Boston’s Logan Airport months before the 9/11 attacks. They saw something and said something — but were ignored, newly unveiled court papers reveal. One of the witnesses, an American Airlines official, actually confronted hijacking ringleader Mohamed Atta after watching him videotape and test a security checkpoint in May 2001 — four months before he boarded the American Airlines flight that crashed into the World Trade Center.
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After security lapses, Congress wants review of secret service
NPR
One reason for the lapses could be low morale within the agency. And a big reason behind that may be the reorganization that placed the agency within the Department of Homeland Security.
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WORKPLACE


Amazon workers take security line woes to Supreme Court
Bloomberg
Jesse Busk spent a 12-hour shift rushing inventory through an Amazon.com warehouse in Nevada to meet quotas. His day wasn't over, though. After clocking out, Busk and hundreds of other workers went through an airport-style screening process, including metal detectors, to make sure they weren't stealing from the Web retailer. Getting through the line often took as long as 25 minutes, uncompensated, he and others employed there say. Those allegations are now before the U.S. Supreme Court in a case that could help redefine companies' reach over hourly workers.
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Workplace violence: Know the numbers, risk factors and possible warning signs
CNN
In Alabama, a recently fired man walks into a UPS facility he'd worked at, shoots dead two people, then takes his own life. In Oklahoma, another man — also just after being laid off — allegedly heads to his former food processing plant, beheads the first person he sees, then attacks another. In Illinois, police say, a man walks into his air traffic control center in the early morning, starts a destructive fire, then slices his own throat. In all three instances, seemingly safe workplaces transformed instantly into danger zones. Why? How might these or other cases of workplace violence have been prevented?
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Workplace violence in health care
Safety+Health
According to Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the rate of workplace violence-related nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for health care and social assistance workers was 15.1 per 10,000 full-time workers in 2012. For private industry overall, the rate was 4.0. Common factors associated with violence in emergency departments include long wait times, psychiatric patients, patients who have a history of violence and patients under the influence of drugs or alcohol, according to a study published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.
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IT SECURITY


DHS no longer needs permission slips to monitor other agencies' networks for vulnerabilities
Nextgov
The Department of Homeland Security has spelled out its intentions to proactively monitor civilian agency networks for signs of threats, after agencies arguably dropped the ball this spring in detecting federal websites potentially harboring the Heartbleed superbug. Annual rules for complying with the 2002 Federal Information Security Management Act require agencies to agree to proactive scanning.
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Medical cybersecurity in the aftermath of Heartbleed
By Jared Hill
From telemedicine to mobile health to electronic medical records, we see the tech world merging with the medical world more and more. However, for every advantage offered by technology, there are several risks — especially when it comes to patients' rights to privacy. Since the initial disclosure of the Heartbleed security bug in April, hundreds of websites — from commercial sites to governmental ones — have been affected by what experts have called one the most catastrophic security flaws in the history of the Internet.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What makes hospital patients turn violent? (Reuters)
A message from the IAPSC President (IAPSC)
DOD has 1 million contractors eligible for security clearance, but not on payroll (The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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