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Home   Find a Practitioner   Lectures   Conferences   Bookstore   Contact Us     Sep. 21, 2012


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French scientists question safety of GM corn
The Washington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A controversial new French study claims that rats fed a diet of Monsanto's genetically modified maize and/or exposed to the company's top-selling weedkiller were more likely to die prematurely and develop tumors and organ damage. The two-year, peer-reviewed study, allegedly the first to look at the long-term effects of genetically engineered corn on animals, was published in the Food and Chemical Toxicology journal. More



Consumer Reports: US needs arsenic limits in rice
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Consumer Reports is urging U.S. limits for arsenic in rice after tests of more than 60 popular products — from Kellogg's Rice Krispies to Gerber infant cereal — showed most contained some level of inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen. The watchdog group said some varieties of brown rice contained particularly significant levels of inorganic arsenic. More

Early menopause linked to increased risk of heart disease, stroke
Johns Hopkins Medicine via RedOrbit    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Women who go into early menopause are twice as likely to suffer from coronary heart disease and stroke, new Johns Hopkins-led research suggests. The association holds true in patients from a variety of different ethnic backgrounds, the study found, and is independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, the scientists say. More

Doctors Nutraceuticals™ Natural Sleep Therapy
A natural alternative to resolve sleeping difficulties without risk of addiction, Muscle Ezze PM has melatonin for enhanced impact on circadian rhythm and natural botanicals with both sedative and anti-anxiety effects. Supporting clinical research from sources such as Am J Med and J Clin Pharm Ther. No charge/no shipping cost for free samples. more


Role of mercury toxicity in hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke
IBCMT    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Mercury has a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups, inactivating numerous enzymatic reactions, amino acids and sulfur-containing antioxidants, with subsequent decreased oxidant defense and increased oxidative stress. The overall vascular effects of mercury include increased oxidative stress and inflammation, reduced oxidative defense, thrombosis, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, and immune and mitochondrial dysfunction. More

Practice Development, Research and Education, Professional Products
By holding itself to extremely high standards and delivering results, Designs for Health has established itself as one of the fastest growing manufacturers and distributors of nutritional supplements, selling exclusively to the health professionals market. MORE


Wal-Mart, Humana reward healthy food purchases
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, is joining with healthcare insurer Humana Inc. to trim the cost of healthy foods for some customers. More than 1 million members of Humana's healthy rewards program will get a 5 percent credit on about 1,300 healthy food items at U.S. Walmart stores starting Oct. 15, the companies said. The credit can be used against future Walmart purchases. More


Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation,
providing reliable information on health and nutrition for 60 yrs. Access the research of Drs. Price and Pottenger and other great nutrition pioneers. Proud to promote nutrition-oriented professional members on our website.
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Liability Insurance for Your Practice
Liability Insurance Solutions can customize your practice liability insurance and market to several insurance companies so you always get the best mix of price and coverage. MORE


Curcumin may aid diabetes fight
The Sacramento Bee    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The diabetes epidemic is expected to add a huge burden to the cost of healthcare in the United States, so anything that helps curb the incidence of diabetes is of great interest to healthcare professionals and the public these days. A recent study suggests that turmeric, the spice used in Indian curries, may help to prevent diabetes. More

Lethal snake venom may hold cancer, diabetes cure
Medical Daily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Venomous snakes may someday save your life, according to scientists who believe that deadly reptiles may provide a good source for new drugs to cure human diseases. The latest findings show that snakes and lizards are able to convert their lethal venom back into harmless molecules and use them safely in other parts of their own bodies. Scientists believe that venom, which was once thought to be too dangerous for human consumption, may one day be harnessed to make safe and effective drugs for a variety of human conditions. More

Discover the Nature-Throid™ Difference

Nature-Throid™ is a natural, hypoallergenic alternative to synthetic thyroid medications. Most synthetic thyroid drugs often contain only T4 hormone. Nature-Throid™ contains two thyroid hormones, T4 and T3 to simulate your body’s natural processes. There is simply no substitute for the healing benefits nature provides. Available by prescription in 13 strengths.
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Healing With Language: Understanding rules
ICIM    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Everyone has rules, but we don't all have the same ones. Someone might break rules about speed limits on the highway but follow rules about seat-belt and turn-signal use. Someone else might obey speed limits and ignore rules about seat belts and turn signals.

To complicate matters, people aren't always consistent about who should follow which rules when. Some people are comfortable following their own rules while allowing others to decide rules for themselves. Others hold the following belief: "My rules for me; my rules for you; my rules for everyone." Relationship and societal problems often result because of a lack of understanding what is involved with rules.

In interpersonal — and intercultural — relationships, different ideas about rules account for a great deal of misunderstanding and conflict. Some rules (such as not killing or stealing) are relatively universal and developed for good reason. Others (such as which side of the street to drive on) are arbitrary but well-accepted. We have personal rules, such as using a bookmark rather than "dog-earing" pages in a book. If not dog-earing is your rule, and you lend a book to a friend who thinks that dog-earing is more convenient than using a bookmark, you can see the conflict coming.

Most rules, however, remain below the level of conscious awareness until conflict about them arises. Most people simply assume that others will follow the same rules that they do. If you are old enough to have been taught the "proper" way to hold a pen or pencil while writing, seeing others write using an "incorrect" grip may cause you to cringe.

What were you taught about the proper behavior for interactions between healthcare providers and clients or patients? Is your rule to address patients by their first names, while they are to address you as "Dr. So-and-so?" How do you feel when that's not their rule? Is it your rule to not get personally involved in the name of keeping a professional distance, while expecting him or her to share intimate details?

Some rules are, of course, important for both doctors and those who see them professionally to follow. In most relationships, and especially in professional relationships, it is important to understand and communicate the reason for the rule. A native shaman will most likely have different rules than a New York psychiatrist. An emergency medical technician will have different rules than a family practitioner. In general, people do better when they know what the rules are and why they are important. And it is always important to remember that most rules are context specific, rather than universally applicable.

Send your questions about communication to Joel P. Bowman or Debra Basham, co-developers of SCS Matters, LLC. We will provide answers to those for you. For more information about Healing with Language: Your Key to Effective Mind-Body Communication, neurolinguistic programming, hypnosis or hypnotherapy, or about the imagine healing process, visit www.SCS-Matters.com or ImagineHealing.info.
 

ICIM: Your Between Conference Connection
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