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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Submit an Abstract for 2016!
ITNS
Submit an abstract for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium before the October 13, 2015 deadline. Join us from 14-16 October 2016 at The Westin Pittsburgh for Transplant Nursing: Bridging Passion, Practice, and Patient Care. Questions about abstract submission? Contact Jennifer Wahl, ITNS Education Manager, at jwahl@itns.org.
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Support ITNS when you shop on Amazon!
ITNS
Remember ITNS when you do your holiday shopping! Amazon will donate 0.5 percent of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to the International Transplant Nurses Society whenever you shop on AmazonSmile. Select ITNS as your preferred charitable organization and shop on Amazon as you normally would! Thank you for your support!
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A Guide to Your Healthcare After Kidney Transplantation
ITNS
This handbook is designed as a general reference for care after kidney transplantation. Transplant centers often have different care routines, monitoring guidelines, and immunosuppressive routines following kidney transplant. You can purchase a PDF download (limited to 3 downloads per purchase) of the handbook in the ITNS online store. Review the Table of Contents and purchase your handbook. Members pay only $5!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Growth hormone found to predict graft function, survival post-liver transplant
Healio
Stabilized insulin-like growth factor 1 serum levels after liver transplantation predicted long-term survival post-transplant and was correlated with graft and liver function, according to study findings. "This study is the first to demonstrate that a prompt recovery of [insulin-like growth factor 1] serum levels is associated with long-term patient survival and shorter hospital stay in [liver transplant] recipients," the researchers wrote.
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Stem cell therapy for liver failure could replace liver transplants
Medical News Today
For the first time, scientists have restored organ function in a severely damaged liver in a live animal by transplanting lab-grown stem cells. The achievement brings closer the day when cell-based therapies that regenerate the organ replace the need for liver transplants. In the journal Nature Cell Biology, the researchers describe what happened when they transplanted liver stem cells into mice with severely damaged livers.
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First, do no harm: When healthcare practitioners work while sick
By Dorothy L. Tengler
"Go to school. You'll be fine," or "If I miss work, I'll be fired." These are common misconceptions most of us have learned throughout life. Why is it so difficult for us to stay home when ill? The reasons are different for each of us. For the general public, one reason is more than 40 million American workers get no paid sick leave. They have to work when ill or take unpaid sick days, which can lead to financial hardship, or even dismissal.
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Low magnesium linked to worse survival in hemodialysis patients
Renal & Urology News
Two new studies implicate low serum magnesium levels with worse survival among hemodialysis patients. A study led by Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California Irvine, found that, after adjusting for demographics and comorbid conditions, HD patients with a serum magnesium level below 1.8 mg/dL had a significant 39 percent increased risk of mortality compared with those who had a reference level of at least 2.2 but less than 2.4 mg/dL.
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Like ITNS on Facebook! Visit the ITNS Facebook page for the latest ITNS and transplant news.


Do cell phones spread infections in hospitals?
Healthline News
Nurses and doctors might show a patient some lab results on an iPad, then touch the device later in the day without washing it first. They might also touch their phone before or after washing their hands between patients. Hospital visitors can also contribute to the problem.
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Effect of ramipril on urinary protein excretion in maintenance renal transplant patients converted to sirolimus
American Journal of Transplantation
This prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of ramipril on urinary protein excretion in renal transplant patients treated with sirolimus following conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor. Patients received ramipril or placebo for up to 6 weeks before conversion and 52 weeks thereafter.
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Healthcare providers preparing for dialysis pay-for-performance
By Christina Thielst
Beginning Jan. 1, 2016, CMS will pay outpatient dialysis facilities for performance. The End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program will promote high-quality services by linking a portion of payment directly to the dialysis facility's performance on quality-of-care measures. Interest in improving quality among this population comes as study results in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology report that 21.7 percent of U.S. dialysis patients die every year.
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Why nurses need heroes
AdvancedWeb
We pry ourselves from bed and force our bodies out into work...rain, sleet, snow, or sunshine. Statistics demonstrate we tend to work more fatigued and drained than ever before, often when ill, or perhaps even feverish or contagious. We barely skim the bottom of Maslow's hierarchy, not because we choose to do so, but because we are nurses. It is the nature of the gig. In light of all this sacrifice, we could use an occasional hero, a force of nature larger than life. How we embraced it when "Sully" landed US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson in January 2009, saving the lives of all passengers and crew members aboard. That was a great week for nurses!
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    BMI doesn't affect kidney transplant survival (HealthDay News via Renal & Urology News)
Interventions to Common Medication-Adherence Barriers Pocket Guide (2) (')
Record-breaking heart and lung transplant survivor appeals for more people to join organ donor register (Daily Mirror)
Nurse practitioners more in demand than most physicians (Forbes)
Record number of transplants in China raises new concern about organ harvesting (Catholic Culture)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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