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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Annual ITNS Symposium: There's still time to register!
ITNS
Have you made plans to attend the Annual ITNS Symposium yet? Now is the time! This year's symposium in the greater Washington, D.C., USA area, offers many educational opportunities. Hear from expert presenters like Dr. Francis L. Delmonico, Bernice Coleman, Cynthia K. Cohen, T. Nicole Kelley, Mario Deng, Federica Raia and more. Register online or by calling +1-847-375-6340.
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The 2014 call for abstracts will be open 24 September, 2013 through 15 January, 2014.




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INDUSTRY NEWS


'Breakthrough' method for diabetic transplants discovered
Medical News Today
Scientists have created a new technique that may offer the chance of transplantation to more diabetics by taking cells from the pancreas and changing their function to produce insulin. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland say the new technique, tested in mice, could reduce waiting times for patients with type 1 diabetes who require islet cell transplants.
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Hand transplantation to become much more practical with Swiss research success
Science World Report
Hand transplantations could become much more practical to apply for patients who lost one or both hands with successful tests of a new method for local immunosuppression, achieved by researchers at Inselspital and the University of Bern, Switzerland.
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The wave of the future: Noninvasive tests for kidney transplants
By Darla Ferrara
Rejection is always a consideration when discussing the success rate of solid organ transplants. Currently, the only way to tell the difference between rejection and other types of post-transplant kidney injury is through biopsy. But a recent study by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases offers a noninvasive way to provide early indication of rejection. The study suggests that low levels of the CXCL9 protein are an indicator of how likely rejection is after transplant surgery. What does this mean to the transplant community?
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Industry Pulse: Will this new protein test be more effective than a biopsy?
ANSWER NOW


Transplantation with stem cells collected after an initial transplant may increase a myeloma patient's risk of developing MDS
The Myeloma Beacon
Results from a recent study indicate that collecting more stem cells prior to a myeloma patient's first transplant may be beneficial for future trans­plants. Specifically, relapsed patients who received a second transplant with cells that had been collected prior to their first transplant, rather than those collected following the first transplant, had a lower risk of later developing myelodysplastic syndromes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Health disparity uncovered in Texas kidney transplants (KVUE-TV via KHOU-TV)
Implantable, Artificial Kidney: Shuvo Roy, Ph.D. (Renal & Urology News)
Study: Urine test might predict kidney transplant rejection (Xinhua)
Organ transplantation: Special consideration for kids (By Dorothy L. Tengler)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Turkmenistan passes organ transplantation bill
OnIslam
During the next meeting of the Turkmen Majlis (Parliament) of the fourth convocation, a bill "On the transplantation of organs and (or) tissues" was passed, a Turkmen government statemen reported. Submitted to the deputies the project will complement a number of laws aimed at protecting the health of citizens and determine the legal and institutional framework of transplantation of organs and (or) tissues.
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US: Who should be 1st in line to receive a transplant organ?
NPR
Organ transplants have become a viable option for a growing number of patients. That has brought increased attention to legal, medical and ethical questions about who should be first in line for organs. Undocumented immigrants and others say they are left off waiting list due to lack of funds and inability to access government health care programs.
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Public awareness and attitudes to living organ donation: Systematic review and integrative synthesis
Transplantation
The deceased-donor organ shortage has driven widespread adoption of living-donor transplantation. Yet, public views on living donation are not well understood. This study aims to synthesize studies on public awareness and attitudes toward living organ donation.
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Ovarian tissue transplant — a new hope for female cancer survivors
Zee News
Cancer treatments, like chemotherapy or radiation therapy, highly hinder both hormonal production and reproductive potential in women, as the treatments attack fast growing cells in the body. However, with an Australian woman, rendered infertile by ovarian cancer treatment, expecting twins after successfully undergoing ovarian tissue transplantation, doctors are expecting that the new technique could revolutionize fertility treatment.
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Ohio family speaks out about botched transplant
The Associated Press via ABC News
The University of Toledo Medical Center is dealing with a family who is speaking out about a recent botched kidney transplant. Unfortunately, a nurse threw out a man's viable kidney just before it was to be given to his sister. The Toledo family is suing the facility over the mistake, saying that it deeply affected their lives and continues to cause them pain. And they say the kidney the patient received in Colorado isn't a perfect match, meaning it will not last as long as her brother's would have.
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