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ITNS invites YOU to submit an abstract
ITNS
Do you have a desire to share your insight and expertise with other transplant professionals? Please consider submitting an abstract for the 23rd Annual ITNS Symposium, to be held 27-29 September 2014 at the JW Marriott Houston, Texas, USA. Submit your abstract by the 15 January 2014 deadline.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


ITNS recognizes 50th Anniversary of the 1st human liver transplant
Submitted by: Nancy Stitt
ITNS celebrates Dr. Thomas Starzl and the 50th anniversary of the first human liver transplant performed in Denver, Colorado on March 1, 1963. What a milestone!
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The call for abstracts for the 23rd Annual ITNS Symposium is now open!
Submit your abstract before the 15 January 2014 deadline.


INDUSTRY NEWS


Canada: Minister Ambrose launches organ and tissue donor social media campaign
NorthumberlandView.ca
The Honorable Rona Ambrose, Canadian Minister of Health, launched a new social media campaign to help raise awareness and promote organ and tissue donation in Canada.
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Like ITNS on Facebook! Visit the ITNS Facebook page for the latest ITNS and transplant news.


Study shows how thymoglobulin reduces rejection risk in kidney transplant
Toronto NewsFIX
In a new trial carried out by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine, the two most common antibodies used in organ transplants — thymoglobulin and basiliximab — are compared for their ability to reduce rejection of a new kidney.
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UA physician revolutionizing organ transplants
KVOA-TV
Every day, an estimated 79 people in the U.S. receive organ transplants. But an average of 18 people die waiting for transplants because of a shortage of viable organs. Many donor organs are routinely discarded because they are considered unsuitable for transplant. Imagine if doctors could take a damaged lung from a deceased patient, clean it up and refurbish it for someone in need of a transplant. That's not only possible, it's close to becoming reality. Dr. Zain Khalpey, a cardiothoracic surgeon at the University of Arizona Medical Center is working hard to revolutionize organ transplant procedures.
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Mechanism protects against rejection in xenotransplantation
ScienceDaily
Researchers at the Bellvitge Institute of Biomedical Research led by Cristina Costa from the New Therapies on Genes and Transplantation group have shown that inhibition of one of the basic components of the complement system protects chondrocytes (cartilage cells) from porcine rejection of xenotransplantation.
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Transplant may benefit patients with tumors of gastroentero-pancreatic origin
Healio
The competitive survival rates achieved using nontransplantation options for patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of gastroentero-pancreatic origin along with the lack of accepted selection criteria has made the use of liver transplant in these cases controversial. A long-term study, however, has demonstrated significant transplant-associated survival benefit in these patients that may support the use of a MELD exception.
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Study on organ scarring may reduce need for organ transplantation
By Joy Burgess
Fibrotic diseases may occur in various body tissues, including kidney, lung and liver tissue. As these fibrotic diseases attack organs, damage occurs, which usually results in the need for a new organ via transplantation. However, researchers at the University of Edinburgh have found that specialized cells called myofibroblasts are the source of the scar tissue. Researchers hope to use the new discovery to develop new treatments to prevent organ deterioration as a result of fibrotic diseases.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Latest technology offers promise for patients awaiting kidney transplants (By Joy Burgess)
Study shows how thymoglobulin reduces rejection risk in kidney transplant (Toronto NewsFIX)
Robyn Urback: What Canada can learn from Israel on organ donation (The National Post)
Transplant: How research is improving lives now (Global News)
HCC-based transplants straining donor pool (Healio)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Transplant doctors concerned about China organ trade
Epoch Times
Organ transplant doctors at a conference in Sydney said they are concerned about unethical transplant practices in China, but remain undecided on reports of organ harvesting from prisoners of conscience. The specialists attending the International Society for Organ Donation and Procurement Congress in Sydney were united in their opposition to China's admitted practice of using organs from prisoners on death row. Their understanding was vague, however, on the extent of the Chinese regime's criminal behaviour, in light of an independent report on illegal organ harvesting in China.
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Low SVR rates observed in HCV/HIV patients assigned peginterferon/ribavirin in clinical practice
Healio
With liver disease now the leading cause of death among patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C, treatment of the HCV coinfection should be a key part of the care of HIV-infected patients. Yet only about 16-20 percent of HIV/HCV coinfected patients receive antiviral treatments for HCV, and combined therapy of pegylated interferon and ribavirin among these patients results in low rates of sustained virologic response in a clinical setting, Dr. George N. Ioannou, MS, of the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System in Seattle, said at The Liver Meeting.
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Disabled baby denied heart transplant
CNN
The mood in the room was somber as five doctors, a nurse and a social worker pulled their chairs around the table and turned to address Autumn Chenkus and Charlie Higgs. The couple's 5-month-old son, Maverick, was down the hallway fighting for his life, and the doctors explained there was nothing they could do to help him.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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