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Apple to take back their electronics and give you credit for it
TIME
Starting April 22, Apple Stores began accepting any of the company’s products for recycling at no charge. Even better, if the items looked resalable, Apple would give the owner a store credit, a.k.a. an Apple gift card. CEO Tim Cook last month told shareholders the company wants to, “Leave the world better than we found it,” and this initiative is part of that. The move caps off an evolution from a few years ago when the company was criticized by some groups as contributing to electronic waste.
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Consortium targets Capri Sun in new push to emphasize recycling
Plastics News
A new campaign by a clutch of environmental groups designed to pressure consumer products companies into taking more responsibility for packaging waste is aiming high and not mincing words. The new "Make It, Take It" campaign is trying to shine a spotlight on Capri Sun drink pouches and brand owner Kraft Foods Inc. for what the campaign’s backers consider an abysmal environmental footprint.
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Proposed rule would ban electronic waste disposal for federal agencies
FierceGovernmentIT
Federal agencies would be prohibited from throwing out electronic waste under a March 6, proposed rule. Monitors, computers, smart phones and other electronics would need to be sold, donated offered to other agencies or recycled through a certified electronic waste recycler, the proposed rule says. Office electronics are made with rare and precious metals, plastic and glass, all of which can be recycled.
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New questions raised about BPA, plastics
KSAT-TV
Five years after the market demanded baby bottle manufacturers replace their products with BPA-free bottles, there is a new chemical concern. In 2008, information about the potential risks associated with BPA (bisphenol A) drove consumers to demand change. While you can readily find packaging with the "BPA-free" label, you can not find a list of ingredients that companies used to replace BPA. "Nobody really knows what the replacements are. There are large numbers of compounds that can be used to replace BPA," said University of Texas at San Antonio chemistry professor Dr. Carlos Garcia.
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US Federal Government amps up e-waste reuse and recycling
Triple Pundit
The U.S. federal government is the nation’s largest consumer and disposer of electronics. Considering the number of federal employees — about 2.7 million at last count, not including the military or courts — U.S. government employees contribute a massive portion to the approximate 2.4 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, that is discarded annually.
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Lowe's hits rare milestone in battery recycling
Marketwired via MENAFN
With more than 1,800 stores collecting rechargeable batteries from customers, Lowe's Companies, Inc. has reached a rare milestone in the world of corporate sustainability. Call2Recycle — North America's first and largest battery product stewardship program — announce that Lowe's has recycled more than 3 million pounds of rechargeable batteries since joining the program.
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Chinese drywall continues to be a problem
By Jessica Taylor
Remember when an estimated 250,000 tons of drywall were imported from China during the housing boom and it was used in approximately 100,000 homes in the U.S.? Do you recall the reports that this drywall installed was emitting pungent, corrosive gases and ruining appliances? For years, builders feared product-related lawsuits and settlements. Unfortunately, the problem hasn't diminished yet. Nearly 10 years later, there are still reports popping up in regard to the drywall causing harm to health and homes all around.
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Toxic Chemical bill championed by industry, chided by children's health advocates
The Huffington Post
Four children dressed up as "Toxin Freedom Fighters," complete with green shorts, capes and masks, appeared in the halls of Congress recently. They hand-delivered a petition that urges legislators to strengthen the nation's regulation of toxic chemicals. The children's visit to Congress came on the heels of the House hearing on the Chemicals in Commerce Act, introduced in February to amend the outdated Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976.
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Deadly side effect to fracking boom
The Associated Press via The State Journal
Booming production of oil and natural gas has exacted a little-known price on some of the nation's roads, contributing to a spike in traffic fatalities in states where many streets and highways are choked with large trucks and heavy drilling equipment. The industry acknowledges the problem, and traffic agencies and oil companies say they are taking steps to improve safety. But no one imagines that the risks will be eliminated quickly or easily.
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Green chemistry: The solution to the environmental regulation problem for electronics?
TTI, Inc.
One of the greatest challenges electronics manufacturers continue to face in complying with the ever-expanding set of regulated chemical substances is being aware of – in advance – whether any of the regulated substances are contained in their products. Despite a decade or more of demanding information on substances from their supply chains, the vast majority of manufacturers have little knowledge about substances beyond the RoHS six: lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, PBBs and PBDEs.
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Makers, e-cyclers, and upcyclers look for better approaches to mitigate e-waste
Tech Republic
The flip side of a world awash with gadgets and IT equipment is an enormous volume of electronic waste generated by human consumption. The amount of global e-waste produced annually over the past five years has been estimated to be as much 49 million metric tons in aggregate, constituted of cell phones, appliances, computers, medical devices and more. By the end of 2014, that annual amount may have increased to as much as 72 million metric tons of e-waste, driven by increasingly frequent upgrade cycles for consumers, businesses and governments.
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Dangerous chemical invades west Wichita, Kansas, drinking water
KNUW-FM
Residents of a West Wichita neighborhood learned in March that their private water wells had been contaminated with a chemical likely to cause major health defects called tetrachloroethylene, or PCE. They’ve also learned that the contamination could be decades old. Finding PCE in this area was in some ways an accident, according to Chris Whitley of the Environmental Protection Agency.
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A leap forward for clean solar
The Huffington Post
Recently, chemists at the University of Wisconsin published an article in the academic journal Science Magazine, in which Dr. Tehshik Yoon and co-authors, Danielle Schultz, Juana Du and Kazimer Skubi, describe how they successfully harnessed light to produce a controlled chemical reaction. Yoon and his team were looking for a solution to manufacture pharmaceuticals without the toxic by-products generated in current processes, heat and UV. Natural light can power reactions that heat and ultra-violet light cannot, but past approaches have been too inefficient to be sustainable.
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