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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          June 05, 2014

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NAHMMA NEWS

SWANA CEUs Offered at NAHMMA Conference
NAHMMA
Join us at NAHMMA’s August 2014, National Conference and receive valuable SWANA CEU’s.

All attendees of the NAHMMA National Conference this August can receive SWANA continuing education units (CEU’s) for attending the conference sessions and/or the conference trainings. There’s no more informative and enjoyable way to earn those required training credits than by attending NAHMMA’s conference.
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SWANA CEUs, HAZWOPER TTT, 24 Hour Certification Exam
NAHMMA
Our conference qualifies all CHMMs for 5 CMPs / day to a total of 20 CMPS or 1 CMP / hour for Certified Trainings. All CMPs are the responsibility of the CHMM. Their certificates for training courses and registration documents for the conference will qualify for proof. We will also have University of Florida — TREEO center — CEU’s for Solid Waste Inspectors.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Unnecessary flame retardants in your home may harm developing brains
Northumberland
A new study from researchers at Simon Fraser University (SFU) offers additional evidence that exposure to PBDE flame retardants is associated with lower intelligence and hyperactivity in children. Last summer Environmental Defence tested the umbilical cord blood of three newborns from the GTA for traces of toxic chemicals like mercury and flame retardants. Out of the 310 chemicals tested for, a total of 137 were found in the three babies. Sadly, even the banned pesticide DDT turned up in one of the samples. But what does prenatal exposure to toxic chemicals mean for infant health?
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Denton's Dirty Jobs — Household Hazardous Waste
YouTube
Day in and day out, there are hundreds of people at the City of Denton, Texas, who perform jobs that are simply dirty. These are jobs like dealing with your waste, providing your electricity, beautifying your parks, repairing your streets and cleaning your drinking water. Each month we will bring you the stories of the employees on the front lines of "Denton's Dirty Jobs".
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EPA to test Riverside Gardens homes for toxic chemicals
The Courier-Journal
Dangerous vapors from the long-closed Lees Lane hazardous waste landfill in Virginia may be seeping into nearby homes, prompting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to go door-to-door to seek permission to test the air in basements and crawl-spaces. The sampling, which will start in late June, comes more than 15 years after the EPA first found problems with a methane-gas collection system that is also supposed to safeguard the Riverside Gardens neighborhood chemical gases migrating from decades of buried waste.
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Are some antimicrobial soaps harmful? A state's decision to ban renews questions.
The Washington Post
Though you may not realize it, you have probably been in contact with the controversial chemical triclosan. Triclosan can be found in soaps and mouthwashes. It’s used to coat earplugs and sporting equipment. It’s mixed into paint. Some experts believe that triclosan is harmful to humans and animals, and that it promotes the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Last month, Minnesota banned triclosan from consumer hand and body sanitizers, a restriction that will take effect in 2017.
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Chemical exposure a bigger threat than climate change
Ockham's Razor
Almost every moment of our lives, from conception to death, we are exposed to thousands of man-made substances whose effects on our health and the environment are largely unknown. They enter our bodies with every breath, each meal or drink, through or clothes and the products we adorn ourselves with, our homes, workplaces and furniture. Currently we manufacture around 143,000 different chemicals, around a third of which are suspected of causing cancers, mutations, birth defects and brain damage or are toxic in some way.
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Vermont claims battery stewardship first
Recycling International
While some municipal governments and private organizations in the U.S. are already collecting and recycling single-use batteries on a voluntary basis, their efforts are largely inconsistent and expensive, according to state legislator and initiator of the bill Tony Klein. Besides demanding more from manufacturers, the program also aims to encourage recycling commitment among consumers.
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Toxic chemicals found in Nike, Adidas World Cup gear
Sustainable Business Oregon
This summer's World Cup in Rio will be toxic. At least according to a study from Greenpeace, Germany. The advocacy group analyzed 33 items made by Nike, Adidas and Puma for the 2014 tournament, screening for chemicals of concern in cleats, goalie gloves and the official "Brazuca" ball. The report called out Adidas' Predator cleat, saying tests showed levels of polyfluorinated compounds at 14 times the company's self-imposed limits.
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Toxic e-waste may become a big problem in a few decades for the developing world
Science World Report
Computer waste is becoming a huge issue in the developing world. As standards of living and access to technology increase, the problem of recycling and disposing electronic devices is becoming more and more of a problem.
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Consumers should still be wary of BPA
Poughkeepsie Journal
Some 93 percent of us carry traces of the synthetic compound bisphenol A (BPA) in our bloodstreams, so it's no wonder that public health advocates are concerned about its potential effects. Developed in the 1950s to strengthen plastics and epoxy resins, BPA is today used in a wide range of products, including many plastic food and drink containers, the lining of most cans, some paper products and dental sealants. But with widespread use of BPA has come increased scrutiny regarding its potential impact on human health.
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2.8 million Arizonans live within vulnerable zones from toxic chemical leaks
Arizona Capitol Times
More than 2.8 million Arizona residents — or 44 percent of the state’s population — live within areas that are most vulnerable to a catastrophic accidental release of gaseous, and sometimes explosive hazardous chemicals. The toxic agents, which the Environmental Protection Agency deems extremely hazardous, include chemicals such as anhydrous ammonia, chlorine and hydrofluoric acid.
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Flue gas reclaimed as polymer feedstock
Chemistry World
The first systematic environmental assessment of an industrial plant that produces polyols from carbon dioxide has revealed that they significantly reduce both carbon dioxide emissions and the demand on fossil fuel reserves. Polyols are the major component of polyurethanes, which make up foams or thermoplastic urethanes in a wide range of applications from mattresses to ski boots. Most polymers are made from fossil fuel-based feedstocks.
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Pharmaceutical waste: Turning hazard into opportunity
GreenBiz
Pharmaceutical waste management is one of the most complex sustainability issues. People and ecosystems are increasingly subjected to medication exposure through the manufacture and disposal of medication. The emergence of drug-resistant "superbugs" in patients and the impact of endocrine disruptors on humans and wildlife are issues of deep concern.
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UN study highlights need to safeguard genetic diversity of forests
RTT News
Urgent action to better manage the genetic diversity of forests is needed to ensure that the benefits it provide will survive, the United Nations said in a first-of-its-kind report on June 3. The study noted with concern that the genetic diversity of forests is currently under pressure from climate change, exploitation and conversion for other uses.
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Colorado on track with paint recycling Bill
Solid Waste & Recycling
Colorado has passed a Bill requiring paint manufacturers to fund and operate an extended-producer responsibility program throughout the state. The Architectural Paint Stewardship Program proposal Senate Bill 14-029 is now in the hands of state Governor John Hickenlooper, who can sign the Bill into law. If passed, Colorado would become the eighth US state implement a program dedicated to leftover paint. The program would be implemented in July 2015.
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Recycled tires gaining traction in market
Rubber News
Markets for recycled tires are more diverse and sophisticated than ever, with rubber-modified asphalt an especially promising technology for the future, according to Dick Gust, director of government affairs and president of national account sales for Liberty Tire Recycling. More than 302 million new tires of all sorts were shipped in the U.S. in 2013, he said. Meanwhile, industry experts indicate a tire recycling rate last year of between 85 and 90 percent of all scrap tires generated.
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NAHMMA NewsWatch
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lauren Swan, Content Editor, 202.684.7496  
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