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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          August 28, 2014

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Congratulations to the NAHMMA National Award winners!
NAHMMA
We enjoyed celebrating all your hard work and dedication at the annual conference. Keep up the good work!
  • Outstanding Personal Service:
    • Laurie Tenace
  • Agent of Change:
    • Volusia County Environmental Management
  • Nightingale Policy Advancement :
    • Colorado Product Stewardship Council
  • Program Innovation:
    • LHWMP Marine Flare Collection
  • Best Education/Outreach:
    • City of Elk Grove
  • Most Inspiring Member:
    • Jim Reece
  • Best New Program:
    • City of Jacksonville HHW Facility
  • Outstanding Public/Private Partnership:
    • MetroPaint
  • Longstanding Program Excellence:
    • Orange County Environmental Protection Division
  • CESQG P2:
    • Interagency Compliance Team
  • Program Excellence:
    • Indiana Household Hazardous Waste Task Force
  • Outstanding Service to Industry:
    • Joanie Arrott
  • President’s Award for Special Service to NAHMMA:
    • Sherrie Walker
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Recycling old batteries into solar cells
MIT News Office
This could be a classic win-win solution: a system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded car batteries — a potential source of lead pollution — into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power. The system is described in a paper in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, co-authored by professors Angela M. Belcher and Paula T. Hammond, graduate student Po-Yen Chen and three others.
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Study confirms that uncontrolled e-waste treatment produces carcinogenic effects
Phys.Org
A study carried out by the research group of the University of Alicante "Waste, Pyrolysis and Combustion," University of Alicante, confirms that most of the waste from electrical and electronic equipment is not treated properly. In this sense, once reused and recycled in treatment plants, electronic devices will pass into thermal systems where contaminants can be destroyed under controlled conditions. Unfortunately, as stated by the research group, most of these wastes are not treated properly and are being moved to third world countries where they are burned with no control producing brominated pollutants, which have carcinogenic effects.
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CSP receives $20 million NSF grant to pioneer bioplastics
University of Minnesota via Biomass Magazine
The University of Minnesota’s Center for Sustainable Polymers recently announced it has been awarded a $20 million grant over five years from the National Science Foundation focused on discoveries of the next generation of biobased plastics. The Center for Sustainable Polymers will be one of only eight NSF Centers for Chemical Innovation in the entire nation.
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Meet BPA-free, the new BPA
Science 2.0
There’s an emerging trend, of late, in the seemingly endless saga of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), which is most commonly used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Although the BPA saga has not yet become completely passé, much of the attention that had been given to BPA is now focused on alternatives to BPA. Indeed, it seems that BPA-free is becoming the new BPA.
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Herbicide-tolerant sorghum hybrids to be introduced in 2016
Midwest Producer
Alta Seeds, the premium brand of Advanta, a supplier of proprietary crop genetics, will demonstrate the first herbicide tolerant sorghum hybrids in their 2014 trials in Hereford, Texas. Alta plans to introduce the first commercial grain sorghum hybrids with this trait in 2016. Herbicide tolerant grain sorghum will give growers greater ability to control yield-limiting grassy weeds, a key crop for areas with limited rainfall.
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Apple bans 2 toxic chemicals in iPhone assembly
Sci-Tech Today
Responding to an activist campaign launched in June, Apple has announced it is prohibiting the use of the toxic chemicals benzene and n-hexane in the final assembly processes for its iPhones and other products. The campaign by non-profit Green America was backed by a large number of environmental, human rights and other organizations.
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Raley's dumps hazardous waste, pays $1.6 million
Environmental Leader
Raley’s has agreed to pay about $1.6 million to settle a hazardous waste disposal lawsuit. The judgment is the result of a civil enforcement lawsuit filed in San Joaquin County, California, to stop the supermarket chain from unlawfully transporting and disposing of retail hazardous waste, according to 26 California district attorneys who announced the settlement.
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'Urban mining' cuts electronic waste
Poughkeepsie Journal
Mining precious metals like gold, silver and copper is extremely costly as well as being energy-intensive, environmentally harmful and dangerous. People continue to seek precious metals because they are not just used for ornamentation; they are essential parts of modern electronic devices. As gadgets wear out or become obsolete, more and more of them end up in landfills.
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Probes search live cyanobacteria for biofuel-production-boosting proteins
Chemical & Engineering News
For something so tiny and brainless, cyanobacteria have proven awfully hard to push around. The blue-green microbes are promising hosts for biofuel production. Yet attempts to boost output by engineering the microbes’ genomes rarely work in big bioreactors. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory think setbacks happen because the biochemistry that regulates fuel compound production isn’t fully understood.
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Study: Common disinfectants cause reproductive problems in mice
Environmental Health News via The Epoch Times
Mice exposed to disinfectants in commercial-grade cleaning products took longer to get pregnant, had fewer pups and suffered more miscarriages and distressed fetuses, researchers reported. These chemicals have been in widespread use for decades. But the new study is the first to look at the reproductive toxicity of newer quat combinations found in cleaning products, according to the researchers from Virginia Tech and Washington State University.
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The ocean is crucial for a healthy planet, and now companies want to strip-mine it for metals
TakePart
Though the deep ocean covers more than half the planet, we know more about the surface of the moon than about life in the far recesses of the sea. But a new study shows just how vital the deep ocean — defined as depths beyond 200 meters, or 656 feet — is for storing atmospheric carbon, nutrient recycling, and marine life support. But the deep ocean also holds vast quantities of valuable minerals and metals, such as manganese and cobalt, making it a target for corporations aiming to mine it.
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Kenya recycles world's e-waste, keeping pollutants out of landfills
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
In an industrial area outside Kenya's capital city, workers in hard hats and white masks take shiny new power drills to computer parts. This assembly line is not assembling, though. It is dismantling some of the estimated 50 million metric tons of hazardous electronic-waste the world generated last year.
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NAHMMA NewsWatch
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lauren Swan, Content Editor, 202.684.7496  
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