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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          September 11, 2014

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Online learning opportunity for green chemistry and chemical stewardship
University of Washington
Study the fundamental principles of green chemistry, which encourages the reduction in use of harmful substances through chemical design and material decision making processes. Examine the connection between chemicals, toxicity and human health and how these factors influence material and product decisions. Learn how to identify sustainability issues related to the adoption of green chemistry practices and how to apply your newly acquired knowledge and skills to promote chemical stewardship.

Key Outcome:
Study the fundamental principles of green chemistry, and learn how to make informed product decisions that take into account sustainability, toxicity and human health concerns.

For more information, visit the website or call 206-685-8936 / 888-469-6499.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


DEA publishes final rule expanding pharmaceutical waste collection
Waste360 (free subscription)
The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has published a new rule expanding pharmaceutical waste collection options for disposal. The Washington-based agency’s final rule implements the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which authorizes the DEA to develop and enact regulations that outline methods to transfer unused pharmaceutical controlled substances to authorized collectors for disposal, the agency said in a news release.
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Cigarette butts bad for planet's health, too
Poughkeepsie Journal
When people talk about the hazards of cigarettes, they typically focus on health risks — lung cancer, heart disease or the dangers of secondhand smoke. But there’s another threat that receives less attention — environmental health. Every year, four trillion cigarette butts are thrown away. Not only are they made of non-biodegradable plastic, but they contain toxins and carcinogens that leach into the environment.
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How to stop cell phone e-waste
Environmental Leader
Manufacturers can take steps to lessen cell phone waste, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News. Customers will buy more than 1.8 billion new cell phones by the end of this year, and they’ll recycle only 3 percent of them.
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Manufacturer proposes increase in bee-toxic pesticide on crops
Greenwire via eNews Park Forest, Inc.
Multinational pesticide manufacturer Syngenta has petitioned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to raise the allowable levels of a systemic pesticide on a number of crops. In certain cases, such as hay from wheat, the company is asking for a 400x increase in the tolerance level set by the federal agency. The pesticide in question is thiamethoxam, a member of the neonicotinoid class of insecticides that have been widely implicated in global pollinator declines.
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What toxic chemical can be used to make solar cells?
NationSwell
How many times have you gone to use your TV remote only to find that its batteries are dead? Another dead battery is useless, right? Well, not to researchers at MIT, which have found another way to use these lifeless objects: recycling their main ingredient — lead — to create solar cells.
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Which way to recycling? Walmart's Closed Loop Fund vs EPR
GreenBiz Group
A 2012 report by As You Sow included an illustration that reveals the shortcomings in U.S. recycling efforts. According to the illustration, the value of wasted packaging in the U.S. in 2010 alone was almost $11.5 billion. "U.S. packaging recycling rates lag behind other developed countries by significant amounts," the report stated.
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Triclosan implicated in slower growth of male fetuses
Consumer Affairs
Triclosan and other compounds widely used in cosmetics, toothpaste, soap and other consumer products may disrupt boys' growth during their fetal period and first years of life, according to a new study conducted by a consortium of U.S. and European agencies. Colgate toothpaste was widely criticized last month for continuing to use triclosan and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned in August that compounds used in antibacterial soap are dangerous to pregnant women and their unborn children.
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University of Minnesota forges way as plastics research leader
The Minnesota Daily
From electronics to tableware, plastic is everywhere and varies by shape and size. Despite plastic-made products’ differences, most share a common origin as fossil fuels drilled out of the ground. Now, equipped with a recently awarded federal grant, University of Minnesota researchers are working to even the playing field between traditional plastics and more environmentally friendly alternatives.
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Aquatic organism that eats water pollutants focus of collaboration
Lab Product News
A new collaborative research initiative based at Trent University focuses on an algae-like organism known as euglena. The Euglena Research Program will bring together faculty and students at Trent to study the untapped potential of euglena, which have the ability to “eat” many different types of water pollutants like minerals, heavy metals and phosphorus.
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Scientists agree that BPA is an 'ovarian toxicant'
Treehugger
Bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, is an ingredient used in polycarbonate plastics, protective liners in food cans and tins, thermal coatings on paper receipts, epoxy-lined beer cans and dental sealants. Unfortunately it’s also known to be a gender-bending endocrine disruptor that mimics estrogen. BPA is so ubiquitous that 90 percent of Americans carry traces of it in their bodies, which means that there is universal fetal exposure.
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Recycling of e-waste increasing
Poughkeepsie Journal
With electronic equipment and gadgets the fastest growing waste stream in many countries, how to deal with so-called "e-waste" may in fact be one of the most pressing environmental problems of the 21st century. According to BCC Research, consumers around the world purchased 238.5 million TVs, 444.4 million computers and tablets and a whopping 1.75 billion mobile phones in 2012 alone.
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