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ASSOCIATION NEWS

Invitation to 'An Introduction to Motivational Interviewing: Focus on Tobacco Use and Dependence'
AAFP
The Smoking Cessation Leadership Center and the American Academy of Family Physicians are pleased to invite you to a free webinar, "An Introduction to Motivational Interviewing: Focus on Tobacco Use and Dependence," on Wednesday, July 22, 2015, at 2 p.m. EDT (90 minutes). Marc L. Steinberg, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Associate Director, in Addiction Psychiatry, at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Sarah S. Mullins, MD, Family Physician in Delaware, and member of the AAFP Tobacco Prevention and Control Advisory Committee, will be discussing AAFP’s work in tobacco dependence prevention and treatment. Click here for more details.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Moody's sees good news for municipalities, bad news for hospitals in tax ruling
NJ Spotlight
Some of New Jersey's most fiscally challenged cities could look to hospitals as a new source of tax revenue, while some nonprofit hospitals could see a negative effect on their bottom lines as a result of a judge's recent ruling that most of Morristown Medical Center's property is not exempt from local taxes. The bond rating firm Moody's described the ruling as "credit positive" for Morristown and other municipalities that could turn to their hospitals for property taxes.
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Mega-hospital merger in N.J. completed
NJ.com
Barnabas Health and Robert Wood Johnson Health System have finalized their plans to merge, creating the largest hospital chain in the state stretching from Essex County to the Jersey shore, the hospitals announced. Barnabas operates Clara Maass Medical Center in Belleville, Community Medical Center in Toms River, Jersey City Medical Center, Monmouth Medical Centers in Long Branch and Toms River, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston and two children's hospitals. Barnabas also has a management agreement with University Hospital in Newark.
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New Jersey cranks up its efforts to fight opioid addiction, deaths
NJ Spotlight
Opioid addiction is a fast-growing threat both in New Jersey and across the country, with the toll of lives lost and families left bereft climbing daily. In 2014 alone, for example, there were 600 fatal heroin overdoses. New Jersey is fighting back, enacting legislation and implementing programs that it hopes will stem the tide of addiction, crime, and death. There are currently three bills on Gov. Chris Christie's desk related to opioid abuse and its consequences, and other bills are under discussion. What’s more, a package of 21 bills was announced last year, in hopes of slowing the number of fatal ODs.
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CMS, AMA unveil steps to ease ICD-10 transition
MedPage Today
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the American Medical Association are trying to make things easier for physicians transitioning to the new ICD-10 diagnosis codes set to take effect on Oct. 1. On Monday, July 6, the AMA and CMS jointly announced that CMS "is releasing additional guidance that will allow for flexibility in the claims auditing and quality reporting process as the medical community gains experience using the new ICD-10 code set." In addition, the agency will appoint an ICD-10 ombudsman "to triage and answer questions about the submission of claims."
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A look at the latest gadgets throughout the medical world
By Rosemary Sparacio
Medical gadgets are in the news often, and manufacturers continue to bring exciting inventions to many areas of medicine. Let's take a look at some recent innovations in the medical world. We'll start in the realm of additive manufacturing. 3-D printers have made a significant impact not only in creating organs for transplantation, but also for prostheses. In Florida, a 10-year-old girl who was born without part of her right arm recently received a custom-made prosthetic limb.
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How EHR technology will evolve to support healthcare reform
EHR Intelligence
The design of early EHR technology was driven primarily by the desire to recreate paper charts in digital form. Just as with paper charts, initial EHR systems were meant only to capture information from the clinical episode — the idea of sharing that information across the care continuum wasn't on anyone's radar. Since then, EHR technology has evolved from solely a documentation tool into a resource capable of helping coordinate care, manage population health and demonstrate value and outcomes.
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Survey: Telemedicine use on the rise
By Scott E. Rupp
The latest telehealth report — one of many in a recent string — suggests the market is finally maturing. "Telehealth Index: 2015 Physician Survey" found strong support exists for video-based telemedicine, more so than for telephone or email communications. The report comes at a time when telehealth providers are making a strong push to qualify the video-based doctor's visit as comparable to a trip to the doctor's office, clinic or emergency room.
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New study reveals strategy to improve interactions between physicians and patients
News Medical
Physicians in their medical residency training programs often focus on scientific reasoning and research evidence in their efforts to provide medical care. While appropriate, this focus may overshadow subtle and indirect communication that reveals important information about the patient's experience with their illness that will help the physician provide better care. A new study by researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston College presents the results of a strategy to train medical residents to reflect on interactions with patients as a way of understanding the meaning of both their patient's, and their own, communication.
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Study: When new doctors 'train' during surgery risks don't rise
HealthDay
People undergoing brain or spine surgery are at no greater risk if doctors-in-training — called residents — assist during the operation, a new study suggests. Researchers found that residents are supervised and their assistance doesn't increase the risk for complications or death.
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