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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit August 27, 2015

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INDUSTRY NEWS

New Jersey's approach to Medicaid ACOs is an experiment worth watching
Health Affairs
As the July issue of Health Affairs recognized, Medicaid has become a hotbed for healthcare transformation, with states increasingly turning to Accountable Care Organizations and medical homes to reduce costs and improve care delivery in their Medicaid programs. New Jersey joined the ranks in July by certifying three of six applicants for the New Jersey Medicaid Accountable Care Organization Demonstration Project — the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, the Healthy Greater Newark ACO and the Trenton Health Team.
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Insurer, NJ medical associations seek solution to surprise out-of-network medical bills
NorthJersey.com
The state's largest health insurance company and organizations representing doctors and hospitals have held private discussions over the summer about legislation to protect consumers from surprise medical bills. They haven't hammered out a compromise yet over the toughest issue — how to determine how much to pay a provider who isn't part of an insurance network — but one participant expressed optimism.
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Feud escalates over future of troubled Newark hospital
NJ.com
Executives for Saint Michael's Medical Center in Newark filed for bankruptcy to expedite the stalled sale of their 148-year-old struggling institution to one of the largest for-profit hospital chains in the country. But all the bankruptcy filing has done so far is escalate a feud with Barnabas Health, the largest non-profit hospital chain in New Jersey, which intends to enter a competing bid to challenge the buyer, Prime Healthcare Services of California.
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Do physicians really hate their EHRs?
By Scott Rupp
Physicians hate their EHRs. Research shows there's no love lost between doctors and the technology. According to a recent study, just 34 percent of physicians said they were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their EHR system in 2014, down from 62 percent in 2010. Diving a little deeper, the percentage of physicians unhappy with their system stood at 54 percent in 2014. If there were an election to determine whether to employ the use of EHRs, the majority would say no to this candidate.
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Supervising physicians' prescribing biases reflected in residents' habits
HealthLeaders Media
A new study raises questions about whether the rhetoric of cost-effective care is being applied to real-world clinical training. Resident physicians are twice as likely to order an expensive, brand-name statin when they're supervised by attending physicians who prefer those medications in their own practice.
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With mergers, concerns grow about private Medicare
The New York Times
As some of the nation's largest health insurers plan to merge, a new report raises fresh concern over the lack of competition in the private Medicare market. The analysis concludes "there is little competition anywhere in the nation." The report from the Commonwealth Fund, a research group, looked at the market share of insurance companies offering private Medicare Advantage plans in 2012.
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Women, minorities still underrepresented in medical specialties
Reuters
Too few women and minorities are entering certain medical specialties in the U.S., researchers say. Diversifying the physician workforce may be key to addressing health disparities and inequities, Dr. Curtiland Deville of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, who worked on the study, said in an email.
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Waves of change: Helping staff navigate the turbulent tides of healthcare
By Christina Thielst
With an emphasis on reducing costs while improving quality and access, the transformation of the U.S. healthcare delivery system is creating additional pressure at the point of care — the encounters between clinicians and their patients. While change is due, it also requires balance and support for those who are caught at the crux as new models of care are being rolled out and payment models are still being developed and implemented.
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