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INDUSTRY NEWS

The Affordable Care Act turns 1: How New Jersey's medical landscape is changing
Inside Jersey
When the Affordable Care Act was debated in Congress in 2009, Bill was working as a project manager in telecommunications and had excellent insurance coverage through his union. “It really was not on my radar,” says the Essex County resident, who is 62. By 2013, however, things had changed for Bill, who asked that his last name be withheld for privacy reasons.
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New Jersey lawmakers push for tighter controls, better treatment in face of deadly drug abuse
Newsworks
A bipartisan group of New Jersey lawmakers is proposing a package of 21 bills to combat what has become an epidemic of heroin and prescription drug abuse. The measures call for increased funding for substance-abuse prevention and higher Medicaid reimbursements to treatment providers. In addition, all physicians would be required to participate in a state prescription-monitoring program.
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The Total Transparency Manifesto: Not so fast
Forbes
David Sable has not seen a patient in 10 years, but if he practiced now, these relationships would be disclosed on the ProPublica “Dollars for Docs” website. The website, part of a movement to increase transparency regarding relationships between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry, lists all the payments that doctors and their practices receive — for giving talks, for research, for writing articles — from the companies whose medications they prescribe, to highlight potential conflicts of interest. Why? Because patients deserve this information.
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The quest for new antibiotics turns back to nature, genetics
By Rosemary Sparacio
With antibiotic resistance becoming an increasing problem in medical treatment, the search is on for new antibiotics, new sources for those antibiotics and new mechanisms. For thousands of years people have used products found in nature for their medicinal properties. A return to nature may be the next area in which we find antibiotics. Smaller pharmaceutical companies are still pursuing research and manufacturing, and they are submitting regulatory documents for new antibiotics to the FDA for their approval. But perhaps more promising is the work being done to look for novel mechanisms and to explore different areas in the search.
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Frustrated AMA pitches 'action plan' on EHRs
Kaiser Health News via MedPage Today
Saying that electronic health records distract doctors, take time away from care, and make physicians less productive, an influential doctors' group called on vendors and government agencies to work with them to develop better, easier-to-use technology. The American Medical Association (AMA) asked the Obama administration to abandon its "all or nothing approach" requiring Medicare providers to go digital or be penalized. The group also wants the government to develop better certification criteria for vendors selling electronic record systems.
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Access to hospital beds may lead to overtreatment, unnecessary care
Fierce Healthcare
More people in New York and New Jersey die in the hospital because the region has more than enough beds to offer, leading to more tests, treatments, prescriptions and people dying in the intensive care unit on a feeding tube or a ventilator, Kaiser Health News, National Public Radio and WNYC reported. "One of the truisms of healthcare is that whatever resources are available, or whatever beds are built, they tend to get filled," Dr. David Goodman, who studies end-of-life care at Dartmouth College's Geisel School of Medicine, told KHN.
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Rutgers awarded $2 million NIH grant to prepare students for academic research careers
News Medical
Rutgers is one of seven institutions in the country selected by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to receive this year's BEST Award — a $2 million grant designed to expose many of the university's most promising biomedical sciences graduate trainees to career opportunities that go beyond the academic path that they have traditionally taken. The award funds development of the Rutgers Interdisciplinary Job Opportunities for Biomedical Scientists (iJOBs) program.
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New Jersey confirms first case of children's virus
Ashbury Park Press via Courier-Post
New Jersey's first case of a child sickened by a virus that can cause serious respiratory illness was confirmed by federal officials. The child went to a Philadelphia hospital, has improved and has been discharged, according to the state Department of Health (DOH). The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the case of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), which is more likely to be found in infants and children and sometimes leads to hospitalization, according to the DOH.
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Funding dispute hurting clinics
NJ Spotlight via Philly.com
Community health-center officials say their ability to function is threatened by delays in resolving a long-running dispute with the state over how they should be paid. A federal district judge has ordered the state to change how it calculates Medicaid payments to federally qualified health centers, which serve as primary-care clinics for low-income residents. The centers sued in 2012 over changes state officials made in how payments are determined. The officials said they believed the centers were being overpaid.
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