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NOBCCHE NEWS

NOBCChE heads to New Orleans!
NOBCChE
The agenda-at-a-glance is online

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NOBCChE STEM Weekend
NOBCChE
NOBCChE will offer its annual STEM Weekend for Middle and High School Students and their Teachers from September 26-28 at the Marriott In New Orleans. Programming will include:
  • National NOBCChE Science Bowl
  • National NOBCChE Science Fair
  • Teachers' workshop
NOBCChE is also introducing a new addition — the STEM Festival. This all day event will feature hands-on activities focused on the applications of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), as well as demonstrations and presentations to engage students, parents and the general public. Presentations are invited by scientists, science centers, planetariums, science museums, and any individual or organization that does STEM outreach. Middle school and high school students, parents, and the general public are invited to explore science and learn about local STEM resources in the community.

All events are free. Visit https://www.nobcche.org/conference/stem for all of the details or to sign up.


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Congratulations! NOBCChE Board member Dr. Malinda Gilmore receives tenure at Alabama A&M University
NOBCChE
Dr. Malinda Gilmore has received tenure and promotion to associate professor at Alabama A&M University. Dr. Gilmore has exhibited outstanding leadership by leading the Chemistry Unit in attaining certification of the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry program from the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training (ACS-CPT), reorganizing the Undergraduate in Research Experiences for the Chemistry Unit, and establishing a Chemistry Advisory Board. In addition to her outstanding accomplishments at AAMU, she is also a member of the NOBCChE board. Congratulations Dr. Gilmore! We are so proud of you on this much deserved achievement.
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Congratulations to NOBCChE National STEM Education Chair Dr. Iris Wagstaff
NOBCChE
Congratulations to Dr. Iris R. Wagstaff for successfully completing her PhD in PhD, STEM Education Research and Policy Analysis (K-12) at North Carolina State University. Her primary research area focused on the factors that influence the entry into and trajectories within the STEM career pipeline that lead to STEM career choice for underrepresented groups — Approaching this research from a social cognitive career theory lens.

Congratulations Dr. Wagstaff! We are so proud of you!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


How to create a more inclusive workplace culture
The Guardian
Have you ever felt like an outsider or an onlooker at work? If you've ever felt more like an invisible spectator than part of a team, then you've experienced the powerful feeling of being the "other." Anyone can feel like the "other" in the workplace. This feeling can stem from a number of different factors, but is commonly a result of being separate from the majority because of characteristics such as race, ethnicity, gender or nationality.
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Where are the schools most segregated?
DiversityInc.
The South is no longer the hub of school segregation, according to new research. In fact, it's actually home to the least segregated schools. With the 60th anniversary of the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education ruling approaching, UCLA's Civil Rights Project has released "Brown at 60: Great Progress, a Long Retreat and an Uncertain Future," its special research project on race and ethnicity in America's schools.
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Why the Maker Movement is important to America's future
TIME
Tim Bajarin grew up in the age of Tinker Toys and Erector Sets. Both toys were meant to inspire kids to be makers rather than consumers. Fast forward to today, and Bajarin is very excited about the Maker Movement. The more he looks into it, the more he believes that it's very important to America's future.
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Obama science fair to focus on girls' education
USA Today
The Obama administration is hoping its annual White House Science Fair will encourage more girls to take up science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. "With students from a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math competitions, this year's Fair will include a specific focus on girls and women who are excelling in STEM and inspiring the next generation with their work," said a White House blog post.
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The big idea: 21st century talent spotting
Harvard Business Review
The first era of talent spotting lasted millennia. For thousands of years, humans made choices about one another on the basis of physical attributes. If you wanted to erect a pyramid, dig a canal, fight a war or harvest a crop, you chose the fittest, healthiest, strongest people you could find. Those attributes were easy to assess, and, despite their growing irrelevance, we still unconsciously look for them: Fortune 500 CEOs are on average 2.5 inches taller than the average American, and the statistics on military leaders and country presidents are similar.
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US Navy vet inspiring next generation of Latino engineers
ABC News
Former U.S. Navy Nuke Barry Cordero said he knew from an early age that he wanted to help people. Growing up poor in the South Side of Chicago as the descendant of immigrants from both Mexico and Germany, he never heard of engineering as a child. He did know that he wanted to go to college and be a professional one day.
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5 suggestions for better STEM education, from students
Mashable
Although demand for workers with STEM qualifications has only grown in recent years, a minority of students elect to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics in high school and college. To spark a discussion about how U.S. schools can motivate more students to The USA Science and Engineering Festival brought together its youth advisors for a Twitter chat on April 17. During the discussion, several themes emerged — suggestions about how to improve STEM education from the very people who stand to benefit from that training.
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'Pushback' to the common science standards: Real or overblown?
Education Week
In March, as Education Week reported, Wyoming became the second state to block the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards. South Carolina blocked adoption legislatively in the summer of 2012. Over recent weeks though, several articles have come out suggesting that differing views on climate change are causing a divide over the science standards, using Wyoming as a case study.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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