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NOBCCHE NEWS

NOBCChE heads to New Orleans!
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The agenda-at-a-glance is online

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INDUSTRY NEWS


If affirmative action is doomed, what's next?
The New York Times
Affirmative action as we know it is probably doomed. When you ask top Obama administration officials and people in the federal court system about the issue, you often hear a version of that prediction. Five of the Supreme Court’s nine justices have never voted in favor of a race-based affirmative action program. Already, the court has ruled that such programs have the burden of first showing “that available, workable race-neutral alternatives do not suffice.”
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Don't offer employees big rewards for innovation
Harvard Business Review
It stands to reason that if you want your employees to come up with high-powered ideas, you need to offer high-powered rewards. That’s why Google created its Founders Awards to provide stock worth up to several million dollars as an incentive to innovation. But our research shows that high-powered rewards are no better than low-powered incentives at producing radical innovations. They may generate excitement and high hopes, but they result in few breakthrough concepts.
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Google finds that there's 'beauty and strength' in diversity
The Grio
As usual, Maya Angelou said it best. “It is time for parents,” she said, “to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.” Most Americans understand the “beauty” of diversity. They recognize the social value it brings to the table. But too many — particularly those from privileged backgrounds — have yet to internalize the strength of diversity. However, in Silicon Valley, that may be about to change.
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School improvement requires more than just a plan
By Thomas Van Soelen
As educational leaders, we spend considerable time building plans for a variety of stakeholders. After that first, often arduous writing of the initial draft, many leaders struggle with how to revise the plan in meaningful, engaging ways. Chuck Bell, a second-year superintendent in Elbert County, Georgia, created his system's first-ever improvement plan then ran his summer leadership retreat and was stumped with what to do next. He chose to model a process that school leaders could immediately lift and use in their schools.
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University of Texas education professor receives grant to study inequalties in STEM education
The Daily Texas
Catherine Riegle-Crumb, education and sociology associate professor, received a nearly $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study racial, ethnic and gender inequalities in science, technology, engineering and math education, also referred to as STEM. Riegle-Crumb said she wants to understand why women and minorities are underrepresented in these fields and will devote the next five years to learning what makes female, black and Hispanic students successful or unsuccessful in science and math as well as what influences these groups to decide on STEM careers.
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How much time should you spend on your job search?
U.S. News & World Report
How much time should you spend on your job search? You’ll get a range of answers depending on whom you ask, but one popular answer you’re likely to hear repeated is that a job search should be a full-time job itself. If you’re like a lot of job-searchers, you’ve probably heard that with bewilderment and concern — and wondered if you’re doing yourself a disservice because you’re not spending 40 hours a week applying to jobs. The reality is, though, that job searching isn’t really going to be a full-time job for most people, so there’s no need to feel guilty for not racking up the hours.
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LinkedIn joins Google, reveals employee gender, diversity gap
Mashable
LinkedIn released employee demographic data for the first time, revealing a workforce that is mostly male, and mostly white. Of LinkedIn's 5400-plus total employees, 61 percent are male, and CEO Jeff Weiner said at Thomas Friedman's Next New World Conference in San Francisco that 82 percent of the company's tech positions are currently filled by men. Ethnically speaking, 53 percent of LinkedIn's U.S. workforce is white, and 38 percent is Asian. That means that black, hispanic and other ethnic groups make up less than 10 percent of the company's U.S. employees.
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Is the GRE too influential?
Inside Higher Ed
The low numbers of female and minority students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields has been fodder for much debate. A new analysis argues that the GRE, a standardized test that most U.S. graduate schools require, is in part to blame. An article published in a recent issue of Nature contends that U.S. universities place too much stress on the GRE when making decisions about graduate admissions.
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