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Is 'leaning in' the only formula for women's success in science?
WPSU-FM
Don't wait to be invited or encouraged to make a career in science, engineering or technology, Frances Arnold advises the young women she teaches at the California Institute of Technology. If you're a scientist, she says, you should know how to solve a problem. "Bemoaning your fate is not going to solve the problem," she says. "One has to move forward."
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The female pioneers who changed STEM forever
The Atlantic
Twenty-year-old Rosalyn Sussman cut a steely, solitary figure in September 1941 as she started her doctorate in nuclear physics at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. “I was the first woman to have a graduate assistantship in physics there since 1917,” she recounted to biographer Eugene Straus. She was the only female faculty member among 400, and there were no women’s bathrooms in the lab facilities — a major inconvenience, especially during the many nights she spent sleeping on the floor of the lab. Despite her confidence and persistence, even Rosalyn couldn’t have predicted that she would graduate several semesters early, make the jump to medicine, develop a revolutionary technique in the field of endocrinology, and win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1977.
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Tech pioneer Ken Coleman talks diversity
USA Today
As a pioneering African-American in the land of tech, Ken Coleman has earned the respect of venture capitalists and the friendship of presidents. And yet as a black man in America, Coleman shudders when police lights flash. "When I'm stopped I want to say, 'I'm not what you think, I've got an MBA, I live in Los Altos Hills, I own a home in Maui.' I want to say that," says Coleman, 69. "Because I know through experience that person might have an image of what I might be and view me as dangerous. And to not feel that way would be foolish."
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Morgan State University builds
Black Engineer
Morgan State University recently received a $23.3-million BUILD award, one of 12 announced by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to university sources, this funding is the second largest in its history and the highest yet from the NIH. The NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program is a set of experimental training awards designed to learn how to attract diverse students into biomedical research and encourage them to become contributors to the NIH-funded research enterprise.
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Earning more? Thank immigrant STEM workers
PBS Newshour
The effect of immigration on the wages and employment of native workers is a topic of perennial debate. According to “Foreign STEM Workers and Native Wages and Employment in U.S. Cities” (NBER Working Paper No. 20093), extending visas to more STEM workers increases the wages of native workers and does not affect the employment of other groups, although it does raise housing costs for college-educated workers.
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How to land your dream job by the end of the year
The Daily Muse via Business Insider
If you've been job hunting, I'm willing to bet you're considering tuning out your job search for the holidays and starting again in the new year. Job searches take a long time, and why start now before everyone's on vacation for two weeks, right? Not really. With an eye on the prize and smart strategies (gathered from our best job search tips of all time), you can land a job by Christmas. Here's how.
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How to get more black men into science
The Chronicle of Higher Education
In the 1980s, when Freeman A. Hrabowski III was vice provost at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, he visited public schools to speak with boys of color about academic achievement. The children often reacted defensively. "What did we do wrong this time?" they would ask. Their skepticism and suspicion made it clear they were accustomed in school to being associated with undesirable behavior.
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Analysis: We are making a difference in tech diversity
USA Today
We are making a difference. Slowly but surely there are signs the tech industry is addressing its woefully inadequate record on racial and ethnic diversity within its ranks. USA Today launched its Inequity in Silicon Valley coverage earlier this year to start a national conversation about the lack of blacks and Hispanics in high tech and the deep challenges faced by people of color in Silicon Valley. Our intent was to shine a searing light on a complex, thorny problem that most tech companies have been loath to discuss or acknowledge publicly for years.
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