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NSH Symposium/Convention abstracts deadline extended
If you are a histology professional looking to expand your network and share your knowledge, submit an abstract for the 41st Annual NSH Symposium/Convention. This year the show will be in Washington, D.C. from Aug. 28-Sept. 2. Submit your presentation by Jan. 13 and have a chance to speak at the best histology show in the country. The finished program will include a combination of 60-minute, 90-minute and three-hour workshops. Presentation styles vary and can be submitted as a lecture, interactive roundtables, hands-on/wet and also panel discussions. The NSH Convention Program Team is seeking a variety of topics, so submit your abstract today! Learn more.
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NSH educator training webinar series
NSH
The NSH educator training webinar series is designed for program directors and instructors of NAACLS-accredited HT/HTL programs, lab supervisors and histology professionals who present topics throughout the year. Our goal is to help improve the quality of teaching and to provide resources to use throughout the year. This year we are featuring three webinars presented by program directors, Debra Wood, MS,HT(ASCP) & Jerry Santiago, MS,HT(ASCP)QIHC. Learn more.
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How can we encourage participation in clinical trials?
Forbes
Failed clinical trials come at a huge cost to their pharmaceutical sponsors. Many trial sites fail to enroll more than a single patient — up to 60 percent of oncology trials, according to Covance, for example. Yet they estimate it costs a sponsor $50,000 for a site start-up, with a loss of almost $2 billion between 2006-2010 from nonperforming sites.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


New class of antibiotic found in dirt could prove resistant to resistance
The Washington Post
With bacteria evolving to resist antibiotics faster than scientists can concoct new drugs, the fight against resistant infections in hospitals and food supplies is a tough battle to win. But a newly discovered antibiotic may prove irresistible to bacteria. Every time an antibiotic is used, bacteria are getting to know it a little better. And eventually, they develop methods to fight it. But because of its unique method of action, this new antibiotic could keep working for longer than any other before bacteria even started to get wise — maybe even longer than 30 years.
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J&J starts clinical trials of Ebola drug
Fortune
Johnson & Johnson Inc. has started clinical trials of its experimental Ebola vaccine, which uses a booster from Denmark's Bavarian Nordic, making it the third such shot to enter human testing. The initiation of the Phase I study in the U.K., which had been expected about now, marks further progress in the race to develop a vaccine against a disease that has killed more than 8,000 people in West Africa since last year.
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Analysis finds federal government under-funds chronic disease prevention research
Medical Xpress
Investigators have, for the first time, completed a comprehensive analysis of National Institutes of Health funding of research to prevent non-communicable chronic diseases and determined that prevention research in the United States is severely underfunded. Specifically, the study found the NIH spends just 7 to 9 percent of its research budget on behavioral interventions to prevent NCDs, despite the fact that 70 percent of deaths in the U.S. are due to NCDs, and that treating people with NCDs accounts for approximately 84 percent of U.S. healthcare expenditures. The study is sponsored by the Vitality Institute and published recently in the online edition of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
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Alzheimer's disease researchers pursue early detection
The Denver Post
In the past 25 years of research on Alzheimer's disease, scientists have learned what happens in the afflicted brain but not how to find it early enough to stop it. A decadelong cascade of important discoveries has brought them to what many researchers call the brink of understanding. Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine are in the hunt, with a drug trial launching and efforts to establish a federally funded research center underway.
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  Baptist Health School of Histotechnology

The Baptist Health School of Histotechnology has an one-year online program that may be the program for you! A non-residential student must have access to an accredited Histology lab and completed 1080 hours of Histology lab experience prior to starting the program. Classes begin in July each year, so call today!
 


IN THE NEWS


Crowd science provides major boost for certain research projects
Lab Manager
Crowd science is making possible research projects that might otherwise be out of reach, tapping thousands of volunteers to help with such tasks as classifying animal photos, studying astronomical images, counting sea stars and examining cancer cell images. Also known as “citizen science,” these efforts to involve ordinary people in research projects have attracted interest from policy makers, scientific agencies and others.
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New handheld imaging device can diagnose melanoma in physicians' offices, potentially reducing volume of skin biopsies referred to pathology labs
Dark Daily
Dermapathologists will be interested to learn about a new handheld, point-of-care device that images melanoma tumors and enables the in vivo diagnosis of melanoma. Because this diagnostic technology is noninvasive and provides immediate results, it is likely to be preferred by patients and doctors alike and could thus substantially reduce the volume of skin biopsies referred to dermapathologists and pathology laboratories.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


A bed of mouse cells helps human cells thrive in the lab
KRCC-FM
A drug that is used worldwide to treat malaria is now being tested as a treatment for cervical cancer. This surprising idea is the result of a new laboratory technique that could have far-reaching uses. Our story starts with Dr. Richard Schlegel at Georgetown University Medical Center. He's best known for inventing the Gardasil vaccine to protect women from cervical cancer.
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University of Michigan spinout 3D Biomatrix secures US patent for cell culture product
Xconomy
3D Biomatrix, the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based life science start-up spun out of the University of Michigan in 2010, has finally secured a U.S. patent for the technology behind its hanging drop plates, which are used by researchers to grow cells in culture. It's the first and only drop plate patent of its kind issued in the U.S., according to the company.
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Illumina plans to tap consumer market for its smartphone-ready DNA chip: Will this create diagnostic consulting opportunities for pathologists?
Dark Daily
In the field of next-generation gene sequencing, San Diego, California-based Illumina Inc., is moving expeditiously to expand into related markets. One such business initiative is to put gene sequencing at the fingertips of consumers via an app and a smartphone. Although it is expected to take several years to make this feasible, the fact that Illumina is starting to spend money today to serve such a consumer market is a significant fact for pathologists and clinical laboratory executives monitoring developments in the gene sequencing sector.
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Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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