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NSH NEWS

NSH membership renewal winner!
NSH
Congratulations to Lydia Higgins, Histologic Technician II at Crittenton Hospital in Michigan for winning a $100 Visa gift card! Thank you to all members who renewed for 2015, we are looking forward to what this year brings us. If you are interested in joining NSH check out all of our benefits here. For those of you who have not yet renewed, there is still time, renew today!
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TOP STORIES


Johnson & Johnson to make clinical data available to outside researchers
The New York Times
The health care giant Johnson & Johnson has agreed to make detailed clinical trial data on its medical devices and diagnostic tests available to outside researchers through a collaboration with Yale University, making it the first large device manufacturer to systematically make such data public. The announcement came on the same day that the Institute of Medicine, of the National Academy of Sciences, called on all sponsors of clinical trials to share detailed study data with outside researchers and recommended that such data be made available within 30 days of a product's approval.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Lab-grown human muscle is a medical breakthrough
CNET
The new kind of lab-grown muscle will allow the study of disease and testing new medications in a safe setting outside the human body, said the team, led by Nenad Bursac, Duke University associate professor of biomedical engineering, and postdoctoral researcher Lauran Madden. "The beauty of this work is that it can serve as a test bed for clinical trials in a dish," Bursac said. "We are working to test drugs' efficacy and safety without jeopardising a patient's health."
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


Medical research investment rate declines in US, yet increases globally
Medical News Today
Evidence published in JAMA finds that from 2004-2012 the rate of investment in medical research in the US declined. However, globally there has been a significant increase, particularly in Asia.
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New findings reveal genetic brain disorders converge at the synapse
HealthCanal
Several genetic disorders cause intellectual disability and autism. Historically, these genetic brain diseases were viewed as untreatable. However, in recent years neuroscientists have shown in animal models that it is possible to reverse the debilitating effects of these gene mutations. But the question remained whether different gene mutations disrupt common physiological processes. If this were the case, a treatment developed for one genetic cause of autism and intellectual disability might be useful for many others.
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Mechanistic insights into spinal muscular atrophy suggest new paths for treatment
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory via Medical Xpress
A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory sheds new light on the underlying pathology of spinal muscular atrophy, a rare but devastating disease that causes muscle weakness and paralysis and is the leading genetic cause of infant deaths. The newly obtained insights may prove valuable as scientists currently work to define optimal treatment strategies for patients.
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IN THE NEWS


FDA outlines ways to assess analytical, clinical performance of NGS ahead of February workshop
GenomeWeb
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering a standards-based approach for assessing the analytical performance of next-generation sequencing diagnostic tests and using centralized curated databases to evaluate their clinical performance, according to a recent paper published by the agency. The preliminary discussion paper, posted on the FDA's website, outlines possible ways the agency might regulate NGS tests in the future and provides discussion points for a one-day public workshop titled "Optimizing FDA's Regulatory Oversight of Next Generation Sequencing Diagnostic Tests" that the FDA will hold at the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, on Feb. 20.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Baptist Health School of Histotechnology

The Baptist Health School of Histotechnology has an one-year online program that may be the program for you! A non-residential student must have access to an accredited Histology lab and completed 1080 hours of Histology lab experience prior to starting the program. Classes begin in July each year, so call today!
 


Pathologists use ProExC antibody cocktail to determine tumor recurrence
News-Medical.Net
Partnering with head and neck surgeons, pathologists at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center's Norris Cotton Cancer Center developed a new use for an old test to determine if a patient's cancer is recurring, or if the biopsy shows benign inflammation of mucosal tissues. In Pathology – Research and Practice, lead author Candice C. Black, DO explained how her team confirmed the utility of ProExC, an existing antibody cocktail commonly used for pathology tests of the uterine cervix. The team's goal remained sorting out problems presented by the frequently equivocal pathology results when surgeons need to determine the difference between true pre-neoplasia and merely inflammatory/reactive biopsies.
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Device allows manipulation of differentiating stem cells
Northwestern University via R&D Magazine
Electroporation is a powerful technique in molecular biology. By using an electrical pulse to create a temporary nanopore in a cell membrane, researchers can deliver chemicals, drugs and DNA directly into a single cell. But existing electroporation methods require high electric field strengths and for cells to be suspended in solution, which disrupts cellular pathways and creates a harsh environment for sensitive primary cells. This makes it nearly impossible for researchers to study the cells naturally, in a setting that encourages the cells to continue differentiating and expanding.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


Platelet transfusions increase odds of death in some rare blood cell disorders
Medical Xpress
People hospitalized with certain rare blood cell disorders frequently receive a treatment that is associated with a two- to fivefold increase in death, according to a new study that reviewed hospital records nationwide. The study authors recommend that for these rare disorders, doctors should administer the treatment, a platelet transfusion, only in exceptional circumstances.
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Blood test for prostate cancer investigated
Vanderbilt University Medical Center via ScienceDaily
A method for detecting "cell-free" tumor DNA in the bloodstream has been developed by scientists who believe that the technique will be transformative in providing improved cancer diagnostics that can both predict treatment outcomes and monitor patient responses to therapy.
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Watching and waiting for codes and fees
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Clinical laboratories will be watching and waiting in the new year for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to resolve several unsettled issues concerning fees for molecular pathology tests, as well as coding for drug-screening tests. CMS approved 21 new codes for advanced genomic studies such as exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing, as well as a range of hereditary and cancer/somatic mutation genetic panels.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New handheld imaging device can diagnose melanoma in physicians' offices, potentially reducing volume of skin biopsies referred to pathology labs (Dark Daily)
New class of antibiotic found in dirt could prove resistant to resistance (The Washington Post)
Alzheimer's disease researchers pursue early detection (The Denver Post)
A bed of mouse cells helps human cells thrive in the lab (KRCC-FM)
Crowd science provides major boost for certain research projects (Lab Manager)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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