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Replace Messy Ice Baths

Cool to -60C. Heat to +150C. Designed for laboratory use, TECA cold/hot plates offer convenient thermal control of samples in histology and life sciences applications.



 




NSH NEWS

CAP announces new evidence-based guideline
NSH
The College of American Pathologists is pleased to announce the release of a new evidence-based guideline: Principles of Analytic Validation for Immunohistochemical Assays. This guideline, now available in the online edition of Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine is the first evidence-based guideline on the validation and re-validation of immunohistochemical assays. Read more.
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NSH Histology Leader Webinar — April 2 — LEAN and Productivity
NSH
Join Randy Stephens from Ventana Medical Systems at 1 p.m. EST April 2 to explore the tools that are the fundamental building blocks in introducing lean into your laboratory. Randy will discuss how to utilize various tools, how to link these tools together to create standard work and look for variation in the lab and finally discuss level loading and line balancing in histology. Learn more.
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7th Annual Summer Symposium sponsored by NSH & Region II State Societies
NSH
The Summer Symposium is one of the best values for your training dollars in histology education offering 12 continuing education credits. This is a two-day event and will take place in Baltimore, Md., June 13-14 at the Embassy Suites Baltimore — Inner Harbor. The program team worked hard to bring you fresh new workshops and are looking forward to a fantastic event. Click here to view a detailed agenda.
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How technology is changing healthcare
The Guardian
"Imagine a world" is a phrase we use a good deal at present, as we tell people how our information systems will come together in 2014, to deliver an integrated solution for the performance management of clinical research. Integration of systems within the clinical research environment is a global pursuit, which is gathering momentum. But if we consider the datatopia we are all in search of, there remains a considerable distance to travel.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword TECHNOLOGY.


Stem cell findings may offer answers for some bladder defects and disease
Medical Xpress
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in coaxing laboratory cultures of human stem cells to develop into the specialized, unique cells needed to repair a patient's defective or diseased bladder. The breakthrough, developed at the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures and published in the scientific journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, is significant because it provides a pathway to regenerate replacement bladder tissue for patients whose bladders are too small or do not function properly, such as children with spina bifida and adults with spinal cord injuries or bladder cancer.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
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Rutgers to enhance clinical trial access for New Jersey cancer patients
Rutgers
Cancer patients throughout New Jersey will have greater access to the latest generation of clinical trials, including several never offered before, as part of a research program funded by a $4.25 million federal grant whose two leading recipients include Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Clinical trials that test new more targeted medications offer patients additional opportunities when standard therapy is not effective for their cancer.
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New research shows promise in blood cancer treatment
By Rosemary Sparacio
Blood cancers pose many challenges for healthcare professionals engaged in clinical research, patient care and treatment. Several new approaches published recently show promise for the future in this field of medicine. One approach for treating leukemia, discovered by a team in Montreal, disarms a gene that is responsible for tumor progression. By targeting the gene, known as Brg1, in leukemia stem cells, researchers think this may offer new therapeutic opportunities by preventing the disease from coming back. Several new drugs are also on the horizon.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
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Visit LabStorage System’s updated website to view details about this new laboratory seating with specially formulated Infection Control coating. Non-porous and easily disinfected, this moisture proof coating is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and stain resistant. more



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IN THE NEWS


New technique for identifying gene enhancers
R&D Magazine
An international team led by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a new technique for identifying gene enhancers — sequences of DNA that act to amplify the expression of a specific gene — in the genomes of humans and other mammals. Called SIF-seq, for site-specific integration fluorescence-activated cell sorting followed by sequencing, this new technique complements existing genomic tools, such as ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing), and offers some additional benefits.
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Natural Killer cell findings should help fight against diseases like leukaemia
Imperial College London
This could lead to better therapies to combat leukaemia and other diseases. The Natural Killer cell is a type of white blood cell that scans the human body for cells that are cancerous or infected with a virus or a bacterial pathogen, to target and destroy them. NK "hit men" are one of the body's first lines of defense against cancer.
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Links between HIV and multiple sclerosis used to suggest new treatments
BioNews Texas
Multiple sclerosis is a disease that affects a large patient population, but as pointed out by Dr. Jerry Wolinsky, from the University of Texas Health Science Center, the decadelong search for multiple sclerosis triggers has ended up in many blind alleys. One trigger that has received relatively little attention from the scientific community is the activation of human endogenous retroviruses, which are remnants of retroviruses that infected our ancestral humans and became incorporated into the human genome.
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Bioprinting of body parts inching closer to reality
By Donna Balancia
New 3-D printing technology is giving hope to medical patients who need to replace and repair body parts and organs. Creating organs through the use of a patient's own cells in many cases, this 3-D printing technology — known as "bioprinting" — is a promising new industry in the scientific community. The 3-D printing industry has been around for almost 20 years, but is coming to light now as many scientific companies compete for lucrative grants and awards to be among the first to replicate human organ, such as a liver, scientists say.
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Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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