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TOP STORIES

Gene therapy cures leukaemia in 8 days
New Scientist
Within just eight days of starting a novel gene therapy, David Aponte's "incurable" leukaemia had vanished. For four other patients, the same happened within eight weeks, although one later died from a blood clot unrelated to the treatment, and another after relapsing.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword GENE THERAPY.




Scientists discover new DNA regions associated with 3 cancers
Los Angeles Times
VideoBriefA massive gene-hunting effort involving hundreds of scientists has identified 74 newly discovered regions of DNA that are associated with breast, ovarian and prostate cancers — diseases that strike about half a million Americans every year. The international project, known as the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, or COGS, nearly doubled the number of genetic markers known to be linked with the three cancers, scientists reported. Their findings could lead to more effective ways to screen, study and treat these diseases.
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Sponsored Content


Researchers build functional ovarian tissue in lab
ScienceBlog
A proof-of-concept study suggests the possibility of engineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a more natural option for hormone replacement therapy for women. In Biomaterials, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine report that in the laboratory setting, engineered ovaries showed sustained release of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hu-on-Hu & Ms-on-Ms Ab Detection

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NSH NEWS


Become an NSH mentor today!
NSH
40 Years ago a group of dedicated volunteers who were passionate about histology decided to form the National Society for Histotechnology. Their goal was to share information and resources with others to make the profession stronger. The profession has grown and opened many opportunities over the years due to this group of dedicated individuals. Their vision, determination and passion is something to be admired by all.

You too can be a part of the continued growth and advancement of the science and profession. There are many ways to share your knowledge and resources available. One way is to mentor new people in the field and new to NSH.

We are looking for more dedicated NSH members to help mentor our new members. Show them what NSH has to offer and where to find the resources they may need. Help develop them into leaders and feel the same passion you do about the science.

Becoming an NSH Mentor does not require a lot of time; just enough to reach out to new members and let them know you can be a resource for them. Let them know about scholarships available or about NSH events coming up to help with their continuing education. Sharing your passion could take as little or as much time as you want.

If you are interested and an NSH member, please click here and fill out a short application with contact information.

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Chart your course to the 39th Annual Symposium/Convention — registration now open
NSH
NSH is bringing the 39th Annual Symposium/Convention to one of the most compact but thriving American cities, Providence, R.I. The vibrancy of the city and fantastic amenities create a very welcoming and personal service that visitors love! The NSH Symposium/Convention is the event for histotechnologists to discover new methods, share best practices and preview what the latest vendors have to offer. The National Convention has the education and access to industry experts that help you succeed. You might even have a little fun. Click here to register now!
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
New SOX-11 (MRQ-58) for MCL!

SOX-11 expression is specific for the identification of cyclin D1 negative mantle cell lymphoma. SOX-11 is useful due to its high expression in cyclin D1 positive and negative MCL. Many B-cell lymphomas can mimic MCL; therefore, it’s important to have additional antibodies to detect cyclin D1 negative MCL. Learn More.
Spring Bioscience - BRAF V600E


Spring Bioscience is leading the research industry by pioneering novel, next generation antibodies that can differentiate mutant and normal protein, enabling pathologists to see relevant mutations within their cellular context. Having already released Exon19 and EGFR L858R for exclusive use by Ventana Medical Systems, Spring Bioscience has launched BRAF V600E.
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StatClick™ Specimen Transport Vials

We’ve added a click and removed the leak. Turn the lid until it clicks. Ship with confidence that your samples and your reputation will stay perfectly preserved. To learn more, please visit us at: www.statlab.com/statclick or contact us at 800-442-3573.


IN THE NEWS


Research deciphers HIV attack plan
Bioscience Technology
A new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory and University of Pennsylvania scientists defines previously unknown properties of transmitted HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. The viruses that successfully pass from a chronically infected person to a new individual are both remarkably resistant to a powerful initial human immune-response mechanism, and they are blanketed in a greater amount of envelope protein that helps them access and enter host cells.
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Lab automation is happening faster than you think
Laboratory Equipment
Automation technology is revolutionizing the health care and food industries. From infusion pumps to 24/7 temperature control and real-time testing and analysis, the development of embedded smart technologies is leading to better care and safety, new growth and vastly improved research and analysis.
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Researchers discover brain cancer treatment using adult stem cells
Science 2.0
An experiment using microvesicles generated from mesenchymal bone marrow cells to treat cancer, neurological researchers at Henry Ford Hospital have discovered a novel approach for treatment of tumor. Specifically, the research team found that introducing genetic material produced by mesenchymal bone marrow cells significantly reduced a particularly resistant form of malignant brain tumor in living lab rats.
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Electronics giants set sights on biotech
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
After spending decades trying to outdo each other in consumer electronics, Samsung and Sony have expanded their rivalry over the past year to the life sciences. Sony DADC, the Japanese giant's discs and digital unit, said March 18 it will use its manufacturing prowess to create Organs-on-a-Chip with the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. The "organs" are actually clear, flexible polymer-encased devices about the size of a computer memory stick, containing hollow microfluidic channels lined by living human cells of a given organ.
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Cells culled from adults may grow human bone
ScienceDaily
Preparations are underway for the first known human trial to use embryonic-like stem cells collected from adult cells to grow bone. The cells technology, called VSEL stem cells, or very small embryonic-like stem cells, are derived from adults — not fetuses.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Human-mouse tooth seeds advance bioteeth research (Wired)
New way to mass produce natural cancer-killing cells offers hope for patients (PRWeb via Laboratory Network)
IHC/Molecular Forum registration open (NSH)
Researchers discover protein that play role in spread of pancreatic cancer (The Medical News)
Researchers form new nerve cells — directly in the brain (Lund University via Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Researchers identify link between immune response and blood clotting
The Medical News
Rice University researchers have found an unexpected link between a protein that triggers the formation of blood clots and other proteins that are essential for the body's immune system. The find could lead to new treatments for thousands of patients who suffer from inflammatory diseases and disorders that cause abnormal blood clotting.
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3-D scaffolds help mimic tumor growth, drug response
Bioscience Technology
Porous polymer scaffolds fabricated to support the growth of biological tissue for implantation may hold the potential to greatly accelerate the development of cancer therapeutics. Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York reported that three-dimensional scaffolds used to culture Ewing's sarcoma cells were effective at mimicking the environment in which such tumors develop.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stellaris RNA FISH Probes

Stellaris RNA FISH is a new research technology that enables direct detection, localization and quantification of RNA. The low cost per assay, simple protocol, and the ability to localize mRNA and lncRNA to organelles and cellular structures provides obvious benefits for life science research. Custom and catalogued probes sets available. MORE
 


Lab equipment made with 3-D printers could cut costs by 97 percent
The Chronicle of Higher Education
Three-dimensional printers are one of society's latest technological miracles to provoke both wide-eyed hopes and dark fears. Somewhere in the middle, between ending low-wage labor and secretly arming felons, lies a host of practical applications.
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'Bedless hospitals' may reshape clinical pathology laboratory testing
Dark Daily
Here's a trend that should catch the attention of every clinical laboratory manager and pathologist working in a hospital. New hospitals are being designed and built around a new treatment paradigm: that tomorrow's patient will get sophisticated treatment, then mostly go home to sleep in their own beds. That means fewer inpatient beds in service and shorter hospital stays.
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Cell machinery untangles misfolded proteins
Evolution News and Views
A multipart machine in bacteria, fungi and plants is able to take "irreversible" aggregates of misfolded proteins and untangle them, then refold them for proper function. How does a cell even recognize a misfolded protein? However it does so, it's a good thing, because aggregates can gunk up the works of a cell. Aggregates have been implicated in diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, making the study of protein folding an important focus of research.
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Structure by feel
TheScientist
Even powerful light microscopes fail scientists when molecules measure less than 200 nanometers, roughly a thousandth the diameter of an eyelash. However, touch can get a good bit closer than sight. By tapping and stretching molecules as small as a single nanometer, atomic force microscopes reveal the topography and mechanical properties of objects or features too small for light or electron microscopes to discriminate.
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Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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