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NSH NEWS

NSH opens registration for HT/HTL study weekend
NSH
Studying for the ASCP Board of Certification Exam is a huge undertaking. That difficulty is increased even more when you are doing it on your own. The amount of time and discipline it takes can be overwhelming. For the first time NSH is offering not only an HT Prep but also an HTL Prep. Attendees can choose one day or stay for the entire weekend. This one of a kind study weekend will be presented by Sarah Britton, BS, HTL(ASCP)cm, program director at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan, and is designed to help guide you through the certification process. Learn more.
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NSH laboratory webinar: Why Does the H&E Staining Look Different Today?
NSH
Wednesday, May 27
Presented by Ada Feldman, MS, HT/HTL(ASCP), Anatech, Ltd., Battle Creek, Michigan
Sections too blue? No nuclear detail? Eosin bleeding? Some slides acceptable, but most are not? Are these complaints all too familiar? This webinar will discuss how modifications in the tissue processing and staining can alter the expected appearance of the stained tissue. Examples of aberrant staining and the corrective actions will be shown. Register now.

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NSH awards spotlight — Polysciences Ann Preece Scholarship
PolySciences Inc. sponsors this $1000 award on a reimbursement basis. Polysciences has been sponsoring this award since 2004, Ann Preece passed in 2003. She was born Nov. 12, 1923 in Boston. She worked at the pathology lab at Scripps Memorial Hospital and authored A Manual for Histological Technician which was published in three editions by Little, Brown & Co. Click here for more details.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


TOP STORIES


Theranos selects Phoenix metro to plant its flag and enter the competitive market for clinical pathology laboratory testing
Dark Daily
Recent developments in Phoenix make it clear that Theranos has chosen the desert metropolis to be the launching pad for its much-publicized proprietary clinical laboratory testing business. The highly secretive company, which claims to have more market value than either Quest Diagnostics Incorporated or Laboratory Corporation of America, is now building the infrastructure needed to operate as a local medical laboratory company in Phoenix.
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Clinical trials in the real world
Forbes
Policymakers, healthcare practitioners and researchers are thinking more and more about the real-world impact of new medicines, which means the life sciences industry is starting to ask new questions. Evidence-based medicine is an approach in healthcare that looks to proven research to direct the best course of action for an illness.
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Plant toxin causes biliary atresia in animal model
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine via Medical Xpress
A study in a recent Science Translational Medicine is a classic example of how seemingly unlikely collaborators can come together to make surprising discoveries. An international team of gastroenterologists, pediatricians, natural products chemists and veterinarians working with zebrafish models and mouse cell cultures have discovered that a chemical found in Australian plants provides insights into the cause of a rare and debilitating disorder affecting newborns. This ailment, called biliary atresia, is the most common indication for a liver transplant in children.
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Draft US House bill sets up a host of new clinical trial provisions
Outsourcing-Pharma.com
With the aim of getting new drugs to patients more quickly, a new House draft bill released recently offers a whole set of new ideas around what the NIH and FDA can do to speed drug discovery and development.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


IN THE NEWS


Your next prescription could be a genome sequence
Forbes
At Advances in Genome Biology and Technology, one speaker told attendees that the use of genome sequencing to improve patient care is no longer a far-off goal — it's happening today. While you won't encounter genome sequencing on an average visit to the ER, there are certain clinical areas where this technology has indeed become routine: cancer, pediatric care, the diagnosis and treatment of ultra rare diseases and a few others.
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Molecular homing beacon redirects human antibodies to fight
pathogenic bacteria

University of California, San Diego via Medical Xpress
VideoBriefWith the threat of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens growing, new ideas to treat infections are sorely needed. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report preliminary success testing an entirely novel approach — tagging bacteria with a molecular "homing beacon" that attracts pre-existing antibodies to attack the pathogens. The study is published by the Journal of Molecular Medicine.
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Improving clinical trials: 5 essential considerations
Clinical Leader
The conduct of clinical trials is not getting any easier. New technologies, additional sources of data, patient involvement in trials, site selection and a number of other efforts are complicating the conduct of trials, even as the industry is doing its best to try and manage the rising cost of them.
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Keeping up with the samples: Bravo Platform helps transcriptome lab meet growing demand
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
When scientists want answers, they dive into the details. Take biologists. They delve down into the very building blocks of life and study, for example, the transcriptome — the list of genes being expressed by their subjects at a given moment. Transcriptomics (also known as expression profiling) can be very revealing. It can, for example, tell researchers whether a certain condition or treatment triggers a response from the subject's immune system.
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The medical research gender gap: How excluding women from clinical trials is hurting our health
The Guardian
According to the Institute of Medicine, every cell in our bodies has a sex, which means men and women are different at a cellular level. That also means that diseases, treatments and chemicals might affect the sexes differently. And yet there's a long and storied tradition of ignoring gender when it comes to health research.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Awards spotlight — JB McCormick, MD Award (NSH)
Small group of labs, test manufacturers float alternative to FDA laboratory-developed tests guidance (GenomeWeb)
Apple's ResearchKit — the real impact on clinical trials (Bioscience Technology)
Researchers discover key mechanism in neural death that causes Parkinson's disease (News-Medical.Net)
Gladstone researchers identify way to prevent multiple sclerosis development in mice (News-Medical.Net)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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