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TOP STORIES

Lights, camera and lots of cellular action
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Innovations in live-cell imaging are reshaping scientific paradigms, opening the door to new approaches for scientific inquiry and opportunities for predictive modeling. Emerging technologies allow more in-depth molecular and cellular data collection from living cells and tissues.
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Scientists pinpoint genetic traits of cells that give rise to gliomas
The Medical News
A multi-institutional team of researchers have pinpointed the genetic traits of the cells that give rise to gliomas — the most common form of malignant brain cancer. The findings, which appear in the journal Cell Reports, provide scientists with rich new potential set of targets to treat the disease. "This study identifies a core set of genes and pathways that are dysregulated during both the early and late stages of tumor progression," said University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Steven Goldman, M.D., Ph.D., the senior author of the study and co-director of the Center for Translational Neuromedicine.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


1 step closer to artificial livers
Bioscience Technology
Prometheus, the mythological figure who stole fire from the gods, was punished for this theft by being bound to a rock. Each day, an eagle swept down and fed on his liver, which then grew back to be eaten again the next day. Modern scientists know there is a grain of truth to the tale, says MIT engineer Sangeeta Bhatia: The liver can indeed regenerate itself if part of it is removed. However, researchers trying to exploit that ability in hopes of producing artificial liver tissue for transplantation have repeatedly been stymied: Mature liver cells, known as hepatocytes, quickly lose their normal function when removed from the body.
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Researchers discover how and where breast tumor cells become dormant and what causes them to become metastatic
Phys.org
The long-standing mystery behind dormant disseminated breast tumor cells and what activates them after years and even decades of latency may have been solved. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have identified the microenvironment surrounding microvasculature — the small blood vessels that transport blood within tissues — as a niche where dormant cancer cells reside. When these blood vessels begin to sprout, the new tips produce molecules that transform dormant cancer cells into metastatic tumors.
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NSH NEWS


2-day IHC/Molecular Forum
NSH
Join NSH for our two-day forum designed to explore molecular and IHC topics in both the clinical and research setting. The NSH IHC/Molecular Forum is a unique experience offering a winning combination of general sessions and workshops providing you with the tools to be successful in the lab. The Forum is a great value for your training dollars featuring 10 expert speakers offering 13 continuing education credits for one low price! Spend your Friday and Saturday choosing workshops that fit your needs, and enjoy your nights exploring the district!
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Spring Bioscience - BRAF V600E


Spring Bioscience is leading the research industry by pioneering novel, next generation antibodies that can differentiate mutant and normal protein, enabling pathologists to see relevant mutations within their cellular context. Having already released Exon19 and EGFR L858R for exclusive use by Ventana Medical Systems, Spring Bioscience has launched BRAF V600E.
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RNAscope: Visualize Single-Copy RNA

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Slimsette™ Recessed Cover Tissue Cassettes

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IN THE NEWS


Genetic traits of cells responsible for 1 type of brain cancer discovered
redOrbit
The genetic traits of glial cells — the cells which give rise to the most common form of malignant brain cancer in humans — have been identified by a team of researchers led by University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Dr. Steven Goldman. "This study identifies a core set of genes and pathways that are dysregulated during both the early and late stages of tumor progression," Goldman, senior author of the study and the co-director of the URMC Center for Translational Neuromedicine, said.
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Strategies to optimize cell culture
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
With the worldwide appetite for biologics soaring — the U.S. alone accounts for roughly $100 billion annually, and that's growing at 11 percent CAGR — efforts to optimize bioprocessing technology remain vigorous and varied. Faster assays for cell-line screening, small-scale modeling to predict large-scale production effects, and new microfluidics able to finely control microenvironments are just a few of the many technologies on the horizon.
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Scientists develop new method for finding therapeutic antibodies news
domain-b.com
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute at La Jolla, Calif., have devised a powerful new technique for finding antibodies that have a desired biological effect. Antibodies, which can bind to billions of distinct targets are already used in many of the world's best-selling medicines, diagnostics and laboratory reagents. The newly reported technique should greatly speed the process of discovering such products.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword NEW METHODS.




Researchers develop a faster method to identify Salmonella strains
The Pennsylvania State University
A new approach may be able to reduce by more than half the time it takes health officials to identify Salmonella strains, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. The finding may significantly speed up the response to many outbreaks of foodborne illness, allowing epidemiological investigators to identify the exact strains of Salmonella that make people sick and to more quickly find — and eliminate — the source of the disease.
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Zebrafish help identify mutant gene in rare muscle disease
University of Michigan via R&D Magazine
Zebrafish with very weak muscles helped scientists decode the elusive genetic mutation responsible for Native American myopathy, a rare, hereditary muscle disease that afflicts Native Americans in North Carolina. Scientists led by John Kuwada, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at the University of Michigan, and Hiromi Hirata of the National Institute of Genetics in Japan originally identified the gene in mutant zebrafish that exhibited severe muscle weakness. Native American myopathy causes muscle weakness from birth and other severe problems that can lead to death before adulthood.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Study: Camomile tea could fight superpower of cancer cells (The Huffington Post)
New hope for Crewe mom of 2-year-old with life-limiting illness (Crewe Chronicle)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
StatClick™ Specimen Transport Vials

We’ve added a click and removed the leak. Turn the lid until it clicks. Ship with confidence that your samples and your reputation will stay perfectly preserved. To learn more, please visit us at: www.statlab.com/statclick or contact us at 800-442-3573.
Hu-on-Hu & Ms-on-Ms Ab Detection


Klear Human
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Stellaris RNA FISH Probes


Stellaris RNA FISH is a new research technology that enables direct detection, localization and quantification of RNA. The low cost per assay, simple protocol, and the ability to localize mRNA and lncRNA to organelles and cellular structures provides obvious benefits for life science research. Custom and catalogued probes sets available. MORE
 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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