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NSH NEWS

The 2014 Membership Scholarship winners have been selected
NSH
The recipients of the New Member, International and Recently Certified scholarships have been chosen. These scholarships are used for education in Histology, participation at NSH events or any purchases of NSH educational materials. Congratulations to Brittany Campbell – New Member Winner, Usman Ali – International Member Winner and Anna Coffey – Recently Certified Winner. Thank you to everyone who applied or nominated someone and congratulations all of the winners.
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Upcoming NSH Webinars
NSH
How to Bring New Antibodies into Your Clinical IHC Laboratory1-2 p.m. CT Aug. 23
You just had a pathologist come to you and want to bring in a new antibody to be used in the clinical laboratory. Now what? What steps are necessary to make this an easy transaction from your pathologist request to a validated antibody in your laboratory. Join Debra Horton, MT(ASCP)QIHC in a demonstration of an antibody request and how to move through the process from the beginning to the end. Horton will setup a process that is easy to follow when a request for new antibodies are needed, making this easy for you and the pathologist happy. Register now.

Validations: What IHC Means to Me 3-4:30 p.m. CT Aug. 23
Erin Grimes, HT(ASCP) will give a detailed presentation of the validation and optimization process with straightforward steps to ensure consistency, accuracy and manageability of these integral components of laboratory operations. Register now

Surgical Pathology Dissection; A Histotech's Guide to Grossing 8-9:30 a.m. CT Aug. 25
The gross room is where specimens are accessioned into the histology laboratory, and the role of the histotechnician in this process is critical for the macroscopic analysis of tissues. Dale Telgenhoff, Ph.D., HTL(ASCP)CM will review the fundamentals of gross dissection such as orientation, dissection, marking, description and sampling. He will also examine the role of the pathologist, pathology assistant and histotechnologist in this evolving area of the laboratory. Register now.

Breast Cancer: Gross and Microscopic Pathology, Biology, Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Diagnosis 8-9:30 a.m. CT Aug. 26
Breast cancer is one of the more common diseases of the 21st century, affecting thousands of women (and men) every year, and is a leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Join Thomas Haas, D.O. to explore both traditional light-microscopic morphology of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the IHC-based classifications of breast cancer (Luminal A and B, Basal and HER2 forms)first laid out in the early 21st century. This webinar will also look at risk factors for breast cancer, premalignant lesions, heredity/family genetics, and other important information about breast disease, beginning with a quick overview of cancer principles and how these various factors can influence the risk for breast cancer. Register now.

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TOP STORIES


Scientists build 1st functional 3-D brain tissue model
Medical News Today
Achieving a greater understanding of the human brain is something researchers have long been striving for but have found difficult, given the organ's complexity and the challenges in studying its physiology in a living body. Now, researchers from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, have created a 3-D tissue model that can mimic brain functions.
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Medicine tailor-made to your DNA ancestry
USA Today
Ancestral DNA testing could do more than reveal the identities of distant cousins or whether you descended from Genghis Khan. Doctors could one day be using your unique ancestral history to diagnose and treat you better. So says a recent study published in Science, in which researchers from Stanford University, UC San Francisco and several other institutions investigated variations in Mexican ancestry.
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Stem cells show promise for stroke treatment
Spire Healthcare
A new type of stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients' bone marrow has shown promising results in studies at Imperial College London. In the first trial of its kind in humans, five patients received the treatment in a pilot study conducted by doctors at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and scientists at Imperial College London.
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Largest cancer genetic analysis reveals new way of classifying cancer
Lab Manager
Researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have completed the largest, most diverse tumor genetic analysis ever conducted, revealing a new approach to classifying cancers. The work, led by researchers at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other TCGA sites, not only revamps traditional ideas of how cancers are diagnosed and treated, but could also have a profound impact on the future landscape of drug development.
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FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer
The Associated Press via CNBC
The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first screening test for colon cancer that uses patients' DNA to help spot potentially deadly tumors and growths. The Cologuard test from Exact Sciences detects irregular mutations in stool samples that can be an early warning sign of cancer. Patients who test positive for the mutations should undergo a colonoscopy to confirm the results.
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IN THE NEWS


Looking through the glass ceiling: Challenges and strategies for women pursuing STEM careers
Lab Manager
As a national push continues to recruit talented girls and young women into math- and science-related careers, a new study underlines the importance of mentoring and other social support systems for women pursuing those research professions. Mary Jean Amon, a doctoral student in the University of Cincinnati's psychology program, presented her findings at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C.
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UCSF genomics diagnostics team uses next-gen sequencing as a 'lab-developed test' to reveal an elusive pathogen's DNA and save a teen's life
Dark Daily
There's rich irony in the FDA's recent announcement that it would move forward with plans to regulate "laboratory-developed tests" just weeks after the national media published stories about how innovative use of an LDT helped physicians make an accurate diagnosis that saved the life of seriously ill 14-year old boy.
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Fast, low-cost technique 'makes effective anti-cancer molecules'
Medical News Today
Researchers have developed what they say is a fast and inexpensive method to create artificial molecules that mimic the body's natural defenses against cancer. This is according to a new study published in the journal Nature Chemistry.
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'Parasite pill' could ease autoimmune disease symptoms
Laboratory Equipment
Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. The Monash University study, published in the FASEB Journal, successfully identified peptides from parasitic worms that suppress the body's immune response. Researchers believe this could pave the way for a new drug containing the peptide to provide relief from the symptoms of autoimmune diseases.
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Study: Gold particles 'could kill brain cancer tumor cells'
The Huffington Post
Your favorite piece of jewellery may be made out of gold, but did you know the material could also be used to save your life? Tiny particles of gold could hold the key to treating the most common form of brain cancer, scientists have said. The "Trojan horse" treatment involves smuggling tiny nanoparticles of gold into the brain to kill tumor cells.
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The Alzheimer's cure that worked on mice
Newsweek
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine announced the discovery of a drug compound that reverses the effects of Alzheimer's disease in mice. The study published recently in the open access journal PLOS Biology identifies the compound as TC-2153, which prevents the protein STEP (STriatal-Enriched tyrosine Phosphatase) from destroying the brain's ability to learn and retain new things. STEP was discovered 25 years ago by Yale School of Medicine professor and leading author of the study, Dr. Paul Lombroso.
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CRISPR used to create mouse models of cancer
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
When scientists study the genetics of cancer, they often breed mice strains that carry selected cancer-associated mutations. But cultivating such strains, usually via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, is often time-consuming and expensive. Could there be a better way — a faster, cheaper way — to create mice strains that carry particular genetic flaws?
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Study shows that 3rd gene is indicator for breast cancer
The New York Times
Mutations in a gene called PALB2 raise the risk of breast cancer in women by almost as much as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the infamous genes implicated in most inherited cases of the disease, a team of researchers reported. Previous data had indicated that mutations in PALB2 were linked to breast cancer, and many genetic tests already screen for them, but it had not been clear to what extent these mutations raised a carrier's odds of developing the disease.
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Is Ebola airborne? Canadian study shows deadly evidence
By Lauren Swan
The Ebola outbreak continues to grow worse every week, and now the relief organization Samaritan's Purse has implied there are actually more than 3,400 infected in West Africa. Both Sierra Leone and Liberia are in a state of emergency, involving the military for Sierra Leone and the retraction of civil rights for 90 days in Liberia. Meanwhile, the CDC and medical journals continue to push the ideas that Ebola is difficult to catch and can only be transmitted through touching bodily fluids. It turns out that may be false.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Congress delays implementation of ICD-10 for another year to placate physicians; delay could cost healthcare industry up to $6.6 billion (Dark Daily)
FDA acts on lab tests developed in-house (The New York Times)
Pancreatic cancer study finds new genetic risk markers (Medical News Today)
Russian researchers close to pre-clinical tests of Ebola vaccine ( The Voice of Russia)
Biomarker for head and neck cancers identified (News-Medical.net)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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