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NSH NEWS

Congratulations to the 2014 Symposium/Convention Scientific poster winners
NSH
Clinical Poster Winner
P-02: Throw Away The Glass Slide: A Novel Way To Store Positive Tissue Controls And Other Tissues from Jose A. Villada, H.T. (ASCP) QIHC, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas
Veterinary, Industry & Research Poster Winner
P-23: Fixation of Rat Eye Using Methacarn Solution: Comparison With Conventional Formaldehyde Fixatives from Min Zhang1; Gerald A. Campbell1; Kenneth Escobar1;Naseem H. Ansari2
From (1)Department of Pathology and (2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX; Contact: minzhang@utmb.edu
Vendor Poster Winner
P-26: Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody BOB1, Clone SP92 Haiping Liu, Ph.D.; Sharmini Muralitharan, Ph.D. From Thermo Fisher Scientific, Fremont, California; Contact: haiping.liu@thermofisher.com
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TOP STORIES


'Enrichment' of subjects in clinical trials is critical
Forbes
The planning of clinical trials to test new drugs for safety and effectiveness is no picnic under the best of circumstances. It requires a grasp of medicine, pharmacology and statistics, among other disciplines. However, when the disease or syndrome for which the drug is intended is not well circumscribed but is instead a spectrum of entities, it can be far more difficult. That makes the concept of "enrichment" critical.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Higher enrollment in Medicare Advantage plans means that more local clinical labs and pathology groups lose access to these patients
Dark Daily
Enrollment in Medicare Advantage health plans is booming. This development is not auspicious for local medical laboratories, hospital lab outreach programs, and anatomic pathology groups because the private health insurers operating these plans typically prefer to contract with national lab companies while narrowing their lab networks. The mathematics of this trend are simple. As Medicare Advantage enrollment increases, the proportion of patients covered by traditional Medicare Part B fee-for-service shrinks. The consequence is that local labs have fewer Medicare Part B patients to serve and are locked out of providing medical laboratory testing services to Medicare Advantage patients.
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Roswell Park's new diagnostic test promises cutting-edge cancer care
The Buffalo News
Roswell Park Cancer Institute's search for a new president and CEO to succeed Dr. Donald L. Trump, who is retiring at the end of the year, has not slowed the institute's exciting work, particularly in personalized medicine. Candace Johnson, Roswell Park's deputy director, said an advanced molecular diagnostic laboratory test that promises personalized treatment for cancer patients based on the analysis of their genes is expected to be available soon.
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IN THE NEWS


From chemistry to clinical
Laboratory Equipment
One wouldn't think twice about spotting a mass spectrometer in a research laboratory, but seeing one in the operating room may make you do a double take. It's that reaction that a team from Purdue University and Brigham and Women's Hospital are hoping to change — they want a mass spectrometer to be just as common in the OR as it is in the lab. Their successful design and implementation of a new tool that helps brain surgeons test and more precisely remove cancerous tissue from tumors moves them one step closer to making that a reality.
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Following state permit, NY Genome Center's clinical lab prepares to submit exome, genome tests
Clinical Sequencing News
The New York Genome Center's new clinical laboratory has obtained a permit from the New York State Department of Health and is preparing to submit its first clinical sequencing test — an exome test for inherited disorders — to the state this month, Clinical Sequencing News has learned. By the end of this year, the lab plans to also submit a whole-genome test for inherited, or constitutional, disorders and a whole-genome and transcriptome test for cancer.
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Promising new cancer therapy uses molecular 'Trash Man' to exploit a common cancer defense
Medical Xpress
While many scientists are trying to prevent the onset of a cancer defense mechanism known as autophagy, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are leveraging it in a new therapy that causes the process to culminate in cell death rather than survival. The novel treatment strategy targets the p62 protein, which is often referred to as the "Trash Man" due to its role in disposing unwanted cellular proteins during autophagy. Results from preclinical experiments suggest this experimental treatment approach could be particularly effective against multiple myeloma and potentially other forms of blood cancers.
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Sorting cells with sound waves
R&D Magazine
Researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University and Carnegie Mellon University have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. Their device, about the size of a dime, could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients' blood, helping doctors predict whether a tumor is going to spread.
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Cue's smartphone device intended to give consumers an inexpensive way to perform certain medical lab tests at home
Dark Daily
Heading to market is another device that works with a smartphone to provide consumers with a way to perform five popular medical laboratory tests. The product was developed by Cue, Inc., which describes itself as an entrepreneurial mobile diagnostics developer. Cue is an at-home lab test device targeted at consumers. It will be priced at about $300.
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Attacking a rare disease at its source with gene therapy
HealthCanal
Treating the rare disease MPS I is a challenge. MPS I, caused by the deficiency of a key enzyme called IDUA, eventually leads to the abnormal accumulation of certain molecules and cell death. The two main treatments for MPS I are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy, but these are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease strikes the central nervous system.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is Ebola airborne? Canadian study shows deadly evidence (By Lauren Swan)
'Parasite pill' could ease autoimmune disease symptoms (Laboratory Equipment)
FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer (The Associated Press via CNBC)
Scientists build 1st functional 3-D brain tissue model (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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