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NSH NEWS

2014 Awards & Scholarship Recipients
NSH
The Diamonds and Boots Awards Ceremony was quite a celebration. We were so pleased to honor the individuals that we work with each day. NSH enables professionals to come together to share and amplify our efforts for learning. The Diamonds and Boots Celebration provides our discipline an opportunity to celebrate professionals and their efforts that have set themselves apart. Click here to review the 2014 award and scholarship recipients.
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NSH Uniform Labeling of Slides and Blocks in Surgical Pathology — an update
NSH
VideoBriefPresented by Vinnie Della Speranza, MS, HTL(ASCP), Co Chair,CAP/NSH Uniform Labeling Task Force The College of American Pathologists and the National Society for Histotechnology have partnered to produce guidelines for the Uniform Labeling of Slides and Blocks in Surgical Pathology. This lecture explains the origins of the project and the conclusions the committee has drawn based on its research and surveying. View the video here.
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FDA pushes forward with plans to regulate lab-developed tests
Dark Daily
After sitting in a state of suspended animation for several years, the Food & Drug Administration's plans to regulate laboratory-developed tests are now front and center. On July 31, the FDA served the required 60-day legal notice to Congress that it was ready to move forward to issue rules for regulation of LDTs. If the federal agency wanted to get the full attention of the clinical laboratory industry, it certainly succeeded. In the four weeks since the FDA alerted Congress of its plans for LDT regulation, there has been a flood of national news stories about this development.
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Laboratory guidance on Ebola
Medscape
For more than four decades, Ebola virus had only been diagnosed in Central or Eastern Africa. Then late this past March, the first cases of Ebola began appearing in a surprising part of the continent. The outbreak in Guinea was the first sign that the virus had made the jump across the continent. Ebola then spread quickly to Sierra Leone and Liberia, and then to Nigeria. As the world learned of the cases, CDC began receiving questions from American hospital labs.
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Easy online access changes doctor-patient relationships
California Health Report
The days of waiting on hold and playing phone tag with the doctor's office are diminishing for patients across the state and nation as more and more health providers implement patient portals. These interactive sites, which allow patients to message physicians, refill prescriptions and schedule appointments online, are bringing medical interactions into the digital age and prompting dramatic changes in doctor-patient relationships.
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Faster and cheaper tests for sickle cell disease
Science World Report
Within minutes following birth, every child in the United States undergoes a series of tests designed to look for certain conditions, including sickle cell disease — a health issue that affects thousands of children around the world. Survival can be a particular problem for children with the health issue for children growing up in the developing world. Now, scientists have discovered cheaper tests for to determine the problem and potentially treat the issue sooner.
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Carcinogenic role of a protein in liver decoded
Medical Xpress
The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in the case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason, it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group at the Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Medical University of Vienna and AKH Vienna, under the guidance of Maria Sibilia from the Institute for Cancer Research, has now discovered that the risk of this protein does not — as previously assumed — depend on its presence within the tumor cell, but rather from its activity in the cells adjacent to the tumor.
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IN THE NEWS


Scientists finally find a good MERS animal model, but marmosets a mixed blessing
News1130
Scientists working to solve the mysteries of the MERS coronavirus have finally filled a gaping hole — with a very tiny animal. U.S. researchers have reported that marmosets are a good animal model for the infection, suffering from the same symptoms humans do when they contract the Middle East respiratory syndrome virus.
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Why HIV patients develop dementia: Researchers track harmful immune reactions in the brain
Medical Xpress
Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. It has not as yet been fully understood how these disorders occur. Researchers from Bochum have now successfully identified mechanisms how infected cells can activate brain-specific immune cells which subsequently display harmful behavior and lead to the destruction of neurons. These findings may help develop biomarkers to identify risk patients and to make a therapeutic strategy possible in the long term. The study was published in the trade journal Experimental Neurology.
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Automating the cell counting process
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Maintaining cell lines in culture, under optimal growth conditions, is essential for production of many biological drugs. The overall health of the culture is generally assessed by the determination of both cell concentration and percentage of viable cells. Many cell culture facilities, growing cells in bioreactors or flask cultures, use the standard manual trypan blue vital dye-exclusion cell-viability assay. Viable cells, which have an intact plasma membrane, exclude the trypan blue stain, whereas nonviable cells have a permeable cell membrane and stain dark blue.
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A 'clear' choice for clearing 3-D cell cultures
R&D
Because Brown University biomedical engineering graduate student Molly Boutin needed to study how neural tissues grow from stem cells, she wanted to grow not just a cell culture, but a sphere-shaped one. Cells grow and interact more naturally in 3-D cultures than when they’re confined to thin slides or dishes. But the very advantage of a culture having thickness also poses a challenge: How to see all the cells and their connections all the way through the culture. It's a problem that confronts many biologists, physicians, bioengineers, drug developers and others who also see 3-D cultures as a useful stage before moving to animal models.
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Study identifies genetic factors involved in pediatric ulcerative colitis
Medical Xpress
UCLA researchers were part of a team that has discovered the interplay of several genetic factors that may be involved in the development of early-onset ulcerative colitis, a severe type of inflammatory bowel disease. The early research findings in mice suggest possible new targets for prevention and treatment strategies to address the inflammation generated by early-onset ulcerative colitis. The rare disease affects infants and young children and can lead to early development of colon cancer and an increased risk of liver damage.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is Ebola airborne? Canadian study shows deadly evidence (By Lauren Swan)
'Parasite pill' could ease autoimmune disease symptoms (Laboratory Equipment)
FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer (The Associated Press via CNBC)
Scientists build 1st functional 3-D brain tissue model (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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