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NSH NEWS

Use of LIS, error tracking and technology in quality management webinar (Keys to Quality Management Series)
NSH
Sept. 11 – Presented by: Wanda Shotsberger, HT(ASCP)HTL
This webinar will cover bar code labeling systems and their implementation. Attendees will learn what a bar code labeling and tracking system can (and cannot) do for the histology lab. The difference between labeling and tracking will be discussed along the advantages and disadvantages of both. Attendees will learn about the implementation of these systems from the histotech's perspective and gain an understanding of how to help the IT professional understand which information to input for the desired output. Click here for complete details and to register online.
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National Society for Histotechnology announces new board of directors for 2014-2016
NSH
The National Society for Histotechnology announces the newly elected Board of Directors for the 2014-2016 term. The Board of Directors election was held during the month of April. The NSH empowers the profession of Histotechnology through collaboration, education and innovation. The board's primary objective is to serve the NSH membership and shape the future of Histotechnology. As such, the NSH Board of Directors requires candidates who are recognized as excellent leaders with significant knowledge and an ability to think strategically. Click here for a full list of officers and region directors for the 2014-2016 term.
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Nation's clinical labs, pathology groups face greatest pressure to cut costs and deliver more value than any other time in past 25 years
Dark Daily
Topic number one at clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups across the nation is cost-cutting, for two reasons. First, it is budget time at hospitals and labs are being told to aggressively reduce their costs in 2015. Second, health insurers are paying less for medical lab testing. Simply said, labs are experiencing one of the toughest financial squeezes in two decades.
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Ovarian cancer awareness: A declining disease rate, and looking ahead to new drugs
Forbes
September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. You might not notice. Ovarian cancer shares the back-to-school educational National Health Observances slot with childhood cancers and prostate cancer, along with other medical conditions, including sickle cell anemia. So it might be worth noting what’s up and down (hint: a trend) with this insidious cancer form. According to the NCI, ovarian cancer affects almost 22,000 U.S. women, and more than 14,000 die from this tumor type each year. Despite progress against this disease, the overall five-year survival rate remains low, just under 45 percent. It's the fifth-leading malignant cause of death among U.S. women.
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A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law
The Wall Street Journal
A fast-growing Virginia laboratory has collected hundreds of millions of dollars from Medicare while using a strategy that is now under regulatory scrutiny: It paid doctors who sent it patients' blood for testing. Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc. transformed itself from a startup incorporated in late 2008 into a major lab with $383 million in 2013 revenues, 41 percent of that from Medicare.
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Team successfully completes 1st clinical trial on HER-2-negative breast cancer with nintedanib
Medical Xpress
The experimental drug nintedanib, combined with standard chemotherapy with paclitaxel, causes a total remission of tumors in 50 percent of patients suffering from early HER-2- negative breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer. These are the conclusions of the Phase I Clinical Trial, sponsored by the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre and carried out by CNIO's Breast Cancer Clinical Research Unit. The study has been published today in British Journal of Cancer.
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Why the controversy? Start sequencing tumor genes at diagnosis
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
There are huge benefits to genomic tumor assessment, both for better treatment now, and later, if first-line treatments fail. But I don't think many cancer patients — and even some physicians — fully understand how important tumor sequencing can be to successful cancer treatment — yet. This is not surprising.
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Australian researchers develop lens to transform smartphones into microscopes with enough resolution to diagnose skin cancers
Dark Daily
Microscopy is going mobile and becoming accessible to people beyond pathologists. Researchers and entrepreneurs have invented lenses to transform smartphones and tablets into flat microscopes. Researchers at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia, have developed an optical lens that can be combined with a smartphone camera to create a microscope for diagnosing skin cancer, reported Physics World in a story published this spring.
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Court nixes Lltigation standards set by pathologists
JD Supra
What if a truck drivers' union tried to set standards for when juries could conclude that a driver was negligent in causing a motor vehicle wreck? Or what if a trucking company could defend its driver falling asleep at the wheel by showing that its other drivers had impeccable driving records? That's about the situation the courts face with litigation guidelines set by two pathologists' groups about when misreadings of Pap smears by members of these groups should be judged negligent.
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New laboratory test detects risk for acute kidney injury
Pharmacy Times
A new laboratory test allows clinicians to determine critically ill patients' risk of developing acute kidney injury in a much shorter time than existing tests do. Within 20 minutes of administration, the NephroCheck test provides a score based on the presence of 2 AKI markers in a patient's urine. The test score correlates to the patient's risk of developing moderate to severe AKI within 12 hours of test administration, according to an FDA press release.
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Study: Banked blood grows stiffer with age
Lab Manager
Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time. They found that, even though the cells retain their shape and hemoglobin content, the membranes get stiffer, which steadily decreases the cells' functionality. Led by electrical and computer engineering professor Gabriel Popescu, the team published its results in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Study of Jewish women shows link to cancer without family history
The New York Times
Women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent who tested positive for cancer-causing genetic mutations during random screenings have high rates of breast and ovarian cancer even when they have no family history of the disease, researchers reported. The finding calls into question the practice of screening women — particularly women of Ashkenazi descent, which most Jews in the United States are — for these mutations only if they report that many women in their family have had cancer. Some women are tested for mutations only after they develop cancer themselves.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    NSH Uniform Labeling of Slides and Blocks in Surgical Pathology — an update (NSH)
Laboratory guidance on Ebola (Medscape)
FDA pushes forward with plans to regulate lab-developed tests (Dark Daily)
2014 Awards & Scholarship Recipients (NSH)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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