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NSH NEWS

NSH & WSHS Partner together for Fall Histology Forum
NSH
Join the National Society for Histotechnology & Washington State Histology Society for a brand new Fall Histology Forum on Saturday, Oct. 25, 2014 in Seattle. This forum offers six 60 minute sessions with a variety of topics including: HAZCOM, Ophthalmic Pathology, IHC Validations, Special Stains, Human Papiloma Virus and CAP regulations. For complete schedule information, registration fees and to register online, click here!
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Histotechs in Motion: Evaluating Ergonomic Concerns for Your Laboratory — Wednesday, Sept. 24
NSH
Our next webinar features a discussion from Dale Telgenhoff, Ph.D., HTL(ASCP)CM of Tarleton State University on the causes of work related musculoskeletal disorders, the symptoms, risk factors, and strategies to avoid long-term injuries. Additionally Dr. Telgenhoff will discuss how to perform an ergonomic assessment in your laboratory and to identify and rectify potential problem areas. Register today.
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TOP STORIES


More deadly pathogens, toxins found improperly stored in NIH and FDA labs
The Washington Post
Workers scouring government laboratories in the wake of the July discovery of smallpox and the mishandling of other infectious agents in federal facilities in recent months have found half a dozen more improperly stored substances, including the deadly toxin ricin and the bacteria that cause plague.
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Researchers trigger muscle repair in mice with muscular dystrophy
Medical News Today
For muscle-wasting disorders such as muscular dystrophy, there are currently no treatments to halt progression. But researchers from the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in La Jolla, California, say they may have found a way to trigger tissue repair in damaged muscles, which could help treat such conditions.
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Chemical treatment makes 3-D cell cultures clearer
Photonics.com
A chemical treatment could lead to better imaging of cells in 3-D cultures. A team at Brown University made the finding while studying how neural tissues grow from stem cells. The researchers created sphere-shaped cell cultures to allow the cells to develop more naturally. The thickness of the cultures hampered transparency of the cells, however, making proper imaging difficult.
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Stanford bioengineers develop a toolkit for designing more successful synthetic molecules
Stanford University
Synthetic molecules hold great potential for revealing key processes that occur in cells, but the trial-and-error approach to their design has limited their effectiveness. Christina Smolke introduces a computer model that could provide better blueprints for building synthetic genetic tools.
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More reports of health insurers' reluctance to reimburse for genetic tests, angering patients and causing labs to go unpaid
Dark Daily
Concerned about the increased cost of genetic tests, health insurers are becoming reluctant to pay for many types of molecular diagnostics and gene tests. When refusing to pay for these tests, however, they face a buzz saw of angry patients — many of whom see a genetic test as their last resort for a diagnosis and selection of a therapy that might just work for them.
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IN THE NEWS


Medical labs make test results easier for patients to understand
The Wall Street Journal
As more patients gain direct access to lab reports and test results, health care providers are offering new tools to help them navigate the maze of numbers and use the data to better manage their own care. Individual patients now can see their results on a wide variety of medical tests, including complete blood counts, urinalysis and allergy tests, under a federal rule that went into effect in April and pre-empted a number of state laws prohibiting disclosure to individuals.
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Automated image analysis cannot replace pathologist
Medscape
Automated image analysis is gaining ground in the field, but the pathologist still has the advantage, say researchers at the College of American Pathologists 2014 meeting. While evaluation of automated analysis is still in the early stages, Maryam Abdelghani, M.D., from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, explained to Medscape Medical News, "in the long run, it could help with time management."
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New model allows for analysis of fetal fat tissue
Brown Daily Herald
A new model in mice, developed by University researchers, could aid the understanding of human fat tissue growth in fetuses. In the study, published in the Journal of Lipid Research Sept. 5, the researchers transplanted the living fat tissue of human fetuses into mice, where the tissue grew in vivo. They then monitored factors affecting the rate and type of the tissue growth, a process that could eventually aid the understanding of the development of obesity, said Jennifer Sanders, assistant professor of pediatrics and co-author of the paper.
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To find patients at highest risk, hospitals combine consumer data with clinical information, including clinical lab results
Dark Daily
Big data is all the rage in health care these days. However, one interesting development in this field is how hospitals are integrating consumer data with clinical data to identify patients at high risk. For example, if the post-surgical heart patient buys a package of cigarettes, some hospitals say they want to know. This is a trend with interesting implications for clinical laboratories. For example, will hospitals using big data in this fashion want to include medical laboratory test results in the mix of information they collect and analyze on their patients? If so, are there ethical issues associated with using such lab test data in this manner?
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Penn surgeons make cancer glow green
Penn Current
The key to a successful cancer surgery is to extract every last bit of the tumor. If any cancerous cells are left behind, they could cause the disease to reappear in the same place or close by later on. Imagine how useful it would be if the malignant tissue glowed bright green, practically shouting, "Cut me out, I'm dangerous!" Turns out, it can. Penn scientists demonstrated that by using an injectable dye that preferentially accumulates in cancerous tissues, they could make lung tumors glow green under an infrared light.
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Urine test could catch lung cancer early
Chemistry World
Lung cancer could be identified earlier, thanks to a new test that uses surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect a cancer biomarker in urine. Detecting lung cancer is difficult as it is hidden in the body, and current clinical methods are not effective at an early stage; the one-year survival rate after diagnosis in the United Kingdom is just 29-33 percent.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nation's clinical labs, pathology groups face greatest pressure to cut costs and deliver more value than any other time in past 25 years (Dark Daily)
A fast-growing medical lab tests anti-kickback law (The Wall Street Journal)
Ovarian cancer awareness: A declining disease rate, and looking ahead to new drugs (Forbes)
Australian researchers develop lens to transform smartphones into microscopes with enough resolution to diagnose skin cancers (Dark Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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