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Why medical clinical trials are so wrong so often
The Washington Post
"Studies show" doesn't mean what it used to. According to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientific studies aren't as definitive as you might think. A team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that two scientists looking at the same clinical trial data (the information that determines what drugs get approved and recommended) may have contradictory interpretations of the results 35 percent of the time.
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NIH adds $10 million to encourage gender balance in clinical trials
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
The U.S. National Institutes of Health is investing $10 million in additional funding in scientific trials to encourage researchers to consider gender in their preclinical and clinical studies. The supplemental monies were provided to 82 projects spanning a range of fields, including basic immunology, cardiovascular physiology, neural circuitry and behavioral health, according to an NIH announcement Sept. 23.
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More workplace tension in hospitals, clinics as 3 generations of physicians try to get along
Dark Daily
What happens when Gen Y, Gen X, and baby boomer physicians are employees in the same hospital, clinic or medical laboratory? There can be a clash of expectations, values and goals that may cause tension in the workplace. This happens when physicians, including pathologists, from different generations and different levels of experience levels come together as employees of hospitals and large medical groups, noted a recent story published by Modern Healthcare.
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New approach aims to silence cancer 'survival genes'
Medical Xpress
Scientists at the University of York are working on a promising new approach for tackling colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The new method works by silencing cancer "survival genes" and could potentially combat cancer through the selective killing of colorectal cancer cells without adverse effects on normal, noncancer cells.
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Heather Dugmore: Are superbugs like Ebola winning the war?
BizNews.com
In Africa, outbreaks of deadly viruses or "superbugs," such as Ebola and Marburg, are on the increase, causing a rising number of deaths over the past 10 years. The 2014 Ebola outbreak is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. But it's not just the West Africans who are in the frontline. Superbugs are a danger to us all, including in hospital environments. People the world over are being admitted to hospital for a particular problem, only to acquire secondary infections there, which can be fatal.
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IN THE NEWS


Few clinical trial results have been independently re-analyzed
The Wall Street Journal
By all accounts, a randomized controlled clinical trial is considered the gold standard for understanding the safety and effectiveness of a medicine. But duplicating results in order to confirm benefits or explore new concerns about side effects is a time consuming and expensive task. Moreover, researchers trying to gain access to data may encounter industry resistance over patient privacy and trade secrets. So perhaps it should not come as a surprise that a new study has found rather few independent analyses of randomized controlled trials have actually been published. How few?
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Georgia Regents University launches immunotherapy clinical trial
Asbestos.com
The Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, a national leader in immunotherapy research, has opened its first clinical trial for mesothelioma patients. The Phase 2 trial is open to patients with unresectable peritoneal or pleural mesothelioma, providing a promising new treatment option for this rare and aggressive cancer.
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Finding risks, not answers in gene tests
The New York Times
Jennifer was 39 and perfectly healthy, but her grandmother had died young from breast cancer, so she decided to be tested for mutations in two genes known to increase risk for the disease. When a genetic counselor offered additional tests for 20 other genes linked to various cancers, Jennifer said yes. The more information, the better, she thought.
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Development of frozen section technology is subject of story highlighting value pathology brings to medicine
Dark Daily
It's a good thing for pathologists each time a local newspaper runs a story that highlights the contribution of pathology to the practice of medicine. Since pathologists typically don't see patients, media stories about the pathologist's role in diagnosing disease are effective ways to educate consumers. This was the case when Rochester, Minnesota-based PostBulletin.com recently ran a story about the pathology laboratory at the Mayo Clinic. The story highlighted the early development of the frozen section technique at Mayo Clinic. This newspaper story created community exposure about the role of pathology and pathologists in delivering quality healthcare.
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Clinical research trials aim to improve quality of life
The Herald-News
Clinical research trials are an important aspect of medicine aimed at testing the latest products available to improve the quality of life for patients. There are different kinds of trials, but hospitals and medical centers that conduct them generally focus on evaluation of new drugs or observation of existing drugs and medical devices. Typical trials involve pulmonology, interventional radiology, neurosurgery, general surgery, cardiology, diabetes. cardiovascular and orthopedics.
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Cancer disparities heighten need to recruit Hispanics for clinical trials
OncLive
The Hispanic population in the United States represents the fastest-growing segment of the population (expected to reach 30 percent of the nation's total by 2050), and faces significant cancer health disparities: lower cancer awareness and lower screening rates leading to a higher incidence of certain cancers and higher mortality rates from at least six cancers compared with non-Hispanic whites.
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Better classifications improve treatment planning for breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Breast cancer can be classified into 10 different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to distinguish each subtype. The research could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease. Cancer arises due to genetic changes that cause normal cells to develop into tumors. As we learn more about breast cancer, we are seeing that it is not one single disease. The mutations in the genes that cause different cancers are not alike, and this is why tumors respond differently to treatment and grow at different rates. Currently, there are two key markers that clinicians use to predict response to treatments.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    More deadly pathogens, toxins found improperly stored in NIH and FDA labs (The Washington Post)
Researchers trigger muscle repair in mice with muscular dystrophy (Medical News Today)
Histotechs in Motion: Evaluating Ergonomic Concerns for Your Laboratory — Sept. 24 (NSH)
Automated image analysis cannot replace pathologist (Medscape)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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