This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit |  Histology Marketplace:     

Home   History   Meeting Calendar   Career Center   Certification   Contact Us    



 




NSH NEWS

Recent change to NAACLS standards
NSH
At its September 2014 meeting, after reviewing over 100 public comments, the NAACLS Board of Directors approved a change to Standard I.D.1.g, requiring HT programs to culminate in either an associate degree or higher, or a certificate for students who hold or complete the required degree. Remaining consistent with similar changes in the past (notably in 2001 with MLT programs), NAACLS accredited HT programs will have until their next accreditation review to show proof of compliance with this standard. Click here to read more about this approved change.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




TOP STORIES


US hospitals up Ebola precautions
Laboratory Equipment
Public hospitals in New York City are concerned enough about Ebola that they've secretly been sending actors with mock symptoms into emergency rooms to test how good the triage staff is at identifying and isolating possible cases. A small hospital in the Ohio countryside has hung up signs, imploring patients to let nurses know immediately if they have traveled recently to West Africa.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Microscopy breakthrough wins chemistry Nobel
Laboratory Equipment
Americans Eric Betzig and William Moerner and German scientist Stefan Hell won the Nobel Prize in chemistry recently for developing new methods that let microscopes see finer details than they could before. Their breakthroughs, starting in the 1990s, shattered previous limits on the resolution of optical microscopes, giving scientists improved tools to study diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's at a molecular level.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


'Financial toxicity:' Who's really to blame for high cancer drug prices?
The Wall Street Journal
File this under "the blame game." The issue of expensive cancer drugs is hardly new, of course, but 60 Minutes aired a recent segment that likely helped highlight the controversy for the mass audience that watches the popular news program. The episode, however, is unlikely to have helped the pharmaceutical industry. Why?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Better Color Images, Less Effort
Datacolor CHROMACAL standardizes color in digital brightfield images.
• Save time; no need for Photoshop!
• Accelerated workflow and batch processing.
• Reliable, consistent, standardized color and brightness.
• Get the best image the first time, all the time.
FREE SLIDE OFFER. Click here

 LEARN MORE
 ChromaCal…Empowering Science with Color Integrity
 


Most clinical labs, pathology groups are under pressure to cut costs and deal with shrinking budgets for 2015
Dark Daily
By any measure, this year's budget season is a tough one for the nation's clinical laboratories and pathology groups. Most labs are scrambling to adjust to reduced reimbursement and directives from their parent hospitals and health systems to shrink their lab budgets for 2015. It's why smart cost-cutting tops the list of challenges at all medical laboratory managers and pathologists. Lab leaders need effective approaches to trim spending in their lab without the need to lay off skilled medical technologists and other experienced lab scientists.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Quest Diagnostics opens 'lab of the future' in Massachusetts
Community Advocate
Touting it as the "lab of the future," city and state officials joined executives and employees from Quest Diagnostics in a recent ceremony to open the company's new 200,000-square-foot lab which is located at the site of the former Hewlett Packard building on Forest Street in Massachusetts. Quest provides diagnostic information services through its network of laboratories and patient service centers, and provides interpretive consultation through its extensive medical and scientific staff, according to company officials.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




IN THE NEWS


Have our bodies held the key to new antibiotics all along?
Lab Manager
As the threat of antibiotic resistance grows, scientists are turning to the human body and the trillion or so bacteria that have colonized us — collectively called our microbiota — for new clues to fighting microbial infections. They've logged an early success with the discovery of a new antibiotic candidate from vaginal bacteria, reports Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Expanded knowledge about human metabolome expected to fuel development of new therapeutic drugs and medical lab tests
Dark Daily
One field of science that bears great potential for use in diagnostics and medical laboratory testing involves the human metabolome. Researchers are gaining more understanding of the genetic underpinnings of complex disease and drug response through metabolic pathways. For example, scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom have linked 145 genetic regions with more than 400 molecules involved in metabolism in human blood, a story in Genetic Engineering News recently reported. The resulting atlas of associations will enable identification of genes that could be targeted in the development of drugs and clinical lab test.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


New 'lab-on-a-chip' could revolutionize early diagnosis of cancer
Phys.org
Scientists have been laboring to detect cancer and a host of other diseases in people using promising new biomarkers called "exosomes." Indeed, Popular Science magazine named exosome-based cancer diagnostics one of the 20 breakthroughs that will shape the world this year. Exosomes could lead to less invasive, earlier detection of cancer, and sharply boost patients' odds of survival.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


Texas Ebola patient gets Chimerix drug, clinical trials planned
Xconomy
Chimerix's lead antiviral drug candidate, which has already shown efficacy treating infections in transplant patients, is being called upon as an emergency Ebola treatment even as the company ramps up to test the drug in humans.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Global pathology networks support collaboration to enhance patient care
InsuranceNewsNet.com
Already central to providing the diagnostic information that helps determine patient treatment, pathologists now play a more pivotal role than ever in clinical decision support, thanks to healthcare reform initiatives focused on providing cost-effective, value-based care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Valley fever drug fast-tracked by FDA
KTVK-TV
A drug that Tucson doctors are developing to cure valley fever is on track to go into clinical trials next year thanks to a fast-track designation from the Food and Drug Administration. Nikkomycin Z, NikZ for short, is an antifungal drug. The FDA approved the University of Arizona's request to designate NikZ as a "qualifying infectious disease product." Those four letters are a big deal.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers engineer new mouse model to study disease (Health Canal)
Biologists find an early sign of pancreatic cancer (Bioscience Technology)
Study: Telomere length impacts melanoma risk (Dermatology Times)
The value of rapid tests (ADVANCE for Medical Laboratory Professionals)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
Contribute news

This edition of Under the Microscope was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Oct. 1, 2014
Sept. 30, 2014 Blast
Sept. 25, 2014
Sept. 23, 2014 Blast



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063