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NSH NEWS

NSH October Webinar: Principles of Perinatal Autopsy
NSH
Histotechs are involved in embedding, sectioning and staining placenta and tissue from perinatal autopsies. Join Jacqueline Macknis, MD, Beaumont Hospital, for an overview of the principles of perinatal autopsy. She will discuss how perinatal autopsy can be a valuable tool in not only deciphering cause of death, but possibly uncovering etiologies that may have ramifications for future pregnancies. Examples of numerous congenital anomalies, inherited syndromes and genetic disorders will be discussed. Basic dissection technique and normal histology will be reviewed. As examination of the placenta is a key aspect of any perinatal death, a brief overview of placental pathology will also be provided. Register today.
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NSH hits milestone of 1,000 followers
NSH
The National Society for Histotechnology is happy to provide histology professionals up to date news and society information through social media. Today, we have officially hit 1,000 followers on twitter: @NS4histotech and are thankful for everyone who follows. If you haven't yet, check out our twitter page, follow us and help share the amazing world of histology.
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TOP STORIES


2nd Ebola Case in US stokes fears of healthcare workers
The New York Times
A nurse here became the first person to contract Ebola within the United States, prompting local, state and federal officials who had settled into a choreographed response to scramble to solve the mystery of how she became infected, despite wearing protective gear, and to monitor additional people possibly at risk. The news further stoked fears of healthcare workers across the country, many of whom have grown increasingly anxious about having to handle Ebola cases.
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Researchers develop new way to assess freshness, effectiveness of whole blood
Dark Daily
At the University of Illinois, researchers have developed a new method to assess the freshness and clinical effectiveness of whole blood. As these findings are validated, pathologists and clinical laboratory scientists who manage hospital blood banks may need to establish new guidelines for the use of such blood products.
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Clinical flu test awarded patent
Arizona Daily Sun
Five years ago, a particularly nasty strain of influenza hit Northern Arizona University. The H1N1 swine flu virus outbreak turned into a pandemic that year, prompting the World Health Organization to declare it a public health emergency of international concern. At NAU's Campus Health Services, 569 students were diagnosed with an influenza-like illness throughout 2009, 10 times the number of students who received that diagnosis the next year.
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BU biolab nears OK amid hopes for tackling Ebola, safety concerns
The Boston Globe
As the Ebola outbreak rages in West Africa, a seven-story laboratory designed to study that virus and others like it stands mostly empty in Boston's South End. But researchers at Boston University, which built the high-security lab with $200 million in federal money, expect a decade of frustration to end soon, perhaps within a year. BU's plans have survived 11 years of risk assessments, public hearings and lawsuits from critics who question the laboratory's safety and value. Now, a review by the Boston Public Health Commission and an inspection by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are the final hurdles before scientists can hunt for treatments and vaccines against the world's deadliest pathogens.
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Anatomic pathology labs adopt new ways to package, transport, and store specimens to reduce formalin and improve staff safety
Dark Daily
One seldom-reported development in anatomic pathology is the new priority histology laboratories are giving to employee safety. Labs have long recognized that exposure to the dangerous chemicals used in processing tissue creates risk for histotechnologists. Today, a rising number of medical laboratories in the United States and other countries are seeking to reduce those risks. Routine chemicals still used today in histology include formalin, toluene and xylene.
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IN THE NEWS


Early detection of colorectal cancer may be possible with newly found biomarkers
Medical News Today
Despite progress over recent decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most deadly cancers worldwide. The main cause of death is spread of disease to other organs such as the liver and the lungs. Thus, any research that suggests new lines of approach for making earlier diagnoses is of keen interest to public health.
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A culture of inclusiveness: Diversity matters in medical education
By Jonathan Ryan Batson
In the world of medicine, many on various committees and boards still believe diversity is not an issue. They think that a few seats at the table means that somehow we have all arrived and that the system is equal. That view is not only morally profane, but also incompetent. It shows the lack of interest to go further and increase both physical bodies for diversity as well as the the cultural dynamics of diversity in their student body and full-time faculty. A diverse education is needed to improve cultural competency and social awareness of the communities that many hope to serve.
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Soon, it will cost less to sequence a genome than to flush a toilet
Business Insider
We don't traditionally think of flushing the toilet as an action that costs money. But actually the cost of a flush comes in at about 1 cent. Imagine if sequencing a genome was that easy and cheap? Soon, that could be a reality, according to a leading genome researcher. He predicts we will be sequencing genomes for pennies as soon as 2020. And when genomes are that cheap to come by, the information they provide will completely revolutionize medicine as we know it.
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New Minnesota Ebola fear: Labs may balk at testing blood
MPR News
Twin Cities doctors and nurses say they can safely handle an Ebola patient, but state health officials are hearing a different story from hospital labs. Many local hospitals are telling the state Health Department their in-house clinical laboratories do not want to perform some routine blood tests on patients identified as possible Ebola cases.
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Novel technique yields fast results in drug, biomedical testing
Lab Manager
The technique works by extracting minute quantities of target molecules contained in specimens of blood, urine or other biological fluids, and then testing the sample with a mass spectrometer. Testing carried out with the technology takes minutes, whereas conventional laboratory methods take hours or days to yield results and require a complex sequence of steps, said Zheng Ouyang (pronounced Jung O-Yong), an associate professor in Purdue University's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.
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New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients
Medical Xpress
Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. In a paper published recently in the journal Cancer Cell, the researchers report how the drug, known as DTP3, kills myeloma cells in laboratory tests in human cells and mice, without causing any toxic side effects, which is the main problem with most other cancer drugs. The new drug works by stopping a key process that allows cancer cells to multiply.
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Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity
News Medical
Known cancer-driving genomic aberrations in localized lung cancer appear to be so consistently present across tumors that a single biopsy of one region of the tumor is likely to identify most of them, according to a paper published in Science. The study led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center addresses the challenge of what scientists call genomic heterogeneity, the presence of many different variations that drive tumor formation, growth and progression, and likely complicate the choice and potential efficacy of therapy.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Researchers engineer new mouse model to study disease (Health Canal)
Biologists find an early sign of pancreatic cancer (Bioscience Technology)
Study: Telomere length impacts melanoma risk (Dermatology Times)
The value of rapid tests (ADVANCE for Medical Laboratory Professionals)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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