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NSH NEWS

NSH webinar: The Magical Science of Rubrics — Nov. 5
NSH
Rubrics define standards of performance and are indispensable as an evaluation tool for educators and students alike. If your institution is not utilizing rubrics, the old saying "You don't know what you don't know" truly holds. Next Wednesday, join Joyce Sohrabian, HT(ASCP) from Argosy University and take a look at rubrics as an assessment tool for a variety of tasks, skills and behaviors that are difficult to evaluate by other means. Learn how to create, write and use rubrics to clarify expectations and to provide consistent grading criteria for student work and behavior. Learn more and register today.
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Fall Histology Forum success!
NSH
On Oct. 25, the one-day fall histology forum took place in the Lake Union Seattle Area. The meeting was a great success hosting 60 attendees who networked and took part in an educational program with six one-hour sessions including everything from safety, to immunohistochemistry, quality control and more. Thank you to the Washington State Histology Society for their hard work and dedication, NSH was happy to partner with this wonderful state society for a fantastic event. Check out pictures in the NSH Facebook Group.
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In Ebola crisis, new vaccine candidates show uncertain promise
Forbes
In the race for an Ebola vaccine, the clear front-runner is the virus, which is expected to spread to tens of thousands of people in the coming weeks. But new competitors are now gearing up for human trials, and eventually the tables could turn. In the long run a vaccine could prove extremely important if, as some predict, the virus causing the current outbreak in West Africa will remain in circulation as a low-level "endemic" disease indefinitely.
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Breath test may diagnose fungal pneumonia
Medscape
A chemical signature of Aspergillus fumigatus infection can be detected in patients' breath, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Clinical Infectious Diseases. "These results provide proof-of-concept that direct detection of exogenous fungal metabolites in breath can be used as a novel, noninvasive, pathogen-specific approach to identifying the precise microbial cause of pneumonia," write Sophia Koo, M.D., from the Division of Infectious Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues.
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Cigna sues Virginia clinical lab for $84 million
Hartford Courant
Two business units of Cigna Corp. are suing a Virginia-based clinical lab for $84 million, alleging the laboratory unlawfully waived out-of-pocket expenses for patients while billing the insurer at "exorbitant and unjustified 'phantom' rates." Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. and Cigna Health and Life Insurance Co. filed the lawsuit against Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, on Oct. 15 in U.S. District Court in Connecticut.
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Heart drug helps treat ALS in mice
Bioscience Technology
Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, destroys the nerve cells that control muscles. This leads to loss of mobility, difficulty breathing and swallowing and eventually death. Riluzole, the sole medication approved to treat the disease, has only marginal benefits in patients.
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Google partners to create cancer genomics cloud platform
HIT Consultant
The Research at Google team is partnering with the Institute for Systems Biology and SRA International Inc. to develop a Cancer Genomics Cloud. The platform will serve as a large-scale data repository and provide the computational infrastructure necessary to carry out cancer genomics research at unprecedented scales.
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IN THE NEWS


'Genetic Testing Handbook' provides pathologists, lab managers with comprehensive reference for clinical genome and exome sequencing
Dark Daily
Clinical use of gene sequencing information has advanced to the point where a team of genetic experts has compiled and issued the Genetic Testing Handbook. The goal of the clinical genome and exome sequencing handbook is to provide clinicians — including pathologists and clinical laboratory scientists — with a useful reference tool.
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Researcher adapting new technologies for fighting worm infections
Drug Discovery & Development
Recent breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and new drugs for those infected by parasitic helminths. These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases and neurocysticercosis, liver flukes, and blood flukes (schistosomes), infect more than 300 million people and cause approximately four million disability-adjusted life years lost due to chronic illness and death each year.
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Here's what would happen if Ebola was stolen from a lab
TIME
Scientists routinely study deadly pathogens like Ebola in order to find ways to fight them and discover potential cures. But what would happen if a sample of Ebola was taken from a lab illegally? Under federal regulations, Ebola is considered a "select agent and toxin" that has the "potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety," and it's illegal to possess, use or transfer a deadly pathogen to another individual without a certificate from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, says John Kraemer, an expert on infectious diseases and the law at Georgetown University's Department of Health Systems Administration.
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Using tiny particles to fight big diseases
Medical Xpress
Physicians will tell you: They are not winning the war on ovarian cancer. But FIU researchers are crafting a new weapon for that battle. A group of scientists have combined medicine and advanced nanotechnological engineering to create a smarter, more targeted therapy that could overcome the most lethal gynecologic cancer.
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Researchers at Livermore National Laboratory develop microbial detection array capable of detecting thousands of known and unknown pathogens in a single rapid test
Dark Daily
Diagnostic technology developed for rapid detection of pathogens in the wounds of soldiers has been licensed to a private company that intends to use it to create new medical laboratory tests. This new technology is capable of identifying thousands of bacteria and viruses in a single test. Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed what is called the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array. Within 24 hours, this single test can detect multiple viruses and bacteria. The LLMDA technology has been licensed to St. Louis-based MOgene LC, a supplier of DNA microarrays, according to a report published by UC Health.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    One-day Histotechnology Forum — Puerto Rico (NSH)
New test to diagnose thyroid cancer (KSAT-TV)
Ebola and the epidemics of the past (The Wall Street Journal)
Breakthrough Replicates Human Brain Cells for Use in Alzheimer's Research (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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