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NSH NEWS

NSH webinar: What Happened to My IHC and What Caused It? Nov. 26
NSH
Wouldn't it be great to be able to narrow down and solve most of our IHC stain issues by the tell-tale signs on our slides. Brown halo, light blue halo around the tissue sample, counterstain coming off purple instead of blue, cells within the tissue sample looks like clouds and does not even match the H&E anymore are some of the tell-tale signs that makes the most of us wonder. Join Jesse Del Campo, HT(ASCP) and track it down to the source by understanding which steps causes what during the stain. Register today.
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NSH volunteer opportunities
NSH
Get involved with NSH by volunteering! There are so many opportunities for you to share your passion of histology with others an meet other professionals in your area of work. Volunteer positions include the Board of Directors, Society Mentor Program, Writing Partners Program and serving on an NSH Resource or Business Committee. Click here to learn more about what each of these positions entail and sign up today!
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TOP STORIES


Scientists uncover vast numbers of DNA 'blind spots' that may hide cancer-causing mistakes
Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK scientists have found more than 400 "blind spots" in DNA which could hide cancer-causing gene faults, according to research published recently in Cancer Research. The researchers found hidden faults in areas that are tricky for gene-reading technology to decode. This technique, which unravels cancer's genetic blueprint, is an important part of the research that scientists carry out to understand more about cancer's biology.
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Next-gen vaccine doesn't contain live virus
Laboratory Equipment
Vaccine technology being developed at The University of Queensland could hold the key to completely eradicating polio by removing live virus from the vaccine production process. A polio inoculation in use since the 1950s has all-but eradicated the crippling disease in the developed world, but "wild polio" strains are running rampant in some poorer countries.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


X-ray laser brings key cell structures into focus
R&D Magazine
Scientists have made high-resolution X-ray laser images of an intact cellular structure much faster and more efficiently than ever possible before. The results are an important step toward atomic-scale imaging of intact biological particles, including viruses and bacteria. The technique was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the Dept. of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and reported in Nature Photonics.
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Texas section of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry hosts all-star lineup of clinical lab experts to share successes at improving lab test utilization
Dark Daily
Changes now happening to healthcare and the practice of medical laboratory medicine were upfront and personal here during last Friday’s meeting of the Texas Section of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry. An impressive crowd of more than 120 pathologists, Ph.D.s, and clinical laboratory professionals were present to learn from an all-star panel of lab industry innovators.
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IN THE NEWS


New hope for halting cell death caused by disease
Medical Xpress
Scientists have discovered mechanisms that control a new form of premature cell death in living tissue — called ferroptosis — and a mechanism to reverse it. Tests have since revealed that this mechanism prevents tissue damage in human kidney cells, acute kidney failure and in liver damage, opening up the possibility for new pharmacological treatments to a number of diseases.
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Genetic-based NanoFlare technology can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream
AZoNano
Metastasis is bad news for cancer patients. Northwestern University scientists now have demonstrated a simple but powerful tool that can detect live cancer cells in the bloodstream, potentially long before the cells could settle somewhere in the body and form a dangerous tumor.
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Cardiac stem cell therapy may heal heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that injections of cardiac stem cells might help reverse heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially resulting in a longer life expectancy for patients with the chronic muscle-wasting disease. The study results were presented recently at a Breaking Basic Science presentation during the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago. After laboratory mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were infused with cardiac stem cells, the mice showed steady, marked improvement in heart function and increased exercise capacity.
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Immune system surprise hints at new strategy for fighting HIV
Yale University via R&D Magazine
The discovery of the innate immunity system's role in mobilizing the body's defenses against invading microorganisms has been long studied at Yale University. Now in Nature Immunology, Yale researchers led by Margarita Dominguez-Villar and David Hafler have discovered a surprising twist to the story that may open a new avenue in the fight against HIV.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    LabCorp spends $5.6 billion to acquire Covance, challenging Quest Diagnostics for position as largest US diagnostics company (Dark Daily)
Human clinical trials to begin on drug that reverses diabetes in animal models (Gizmag)
Nanodaisies can kill cancer (Laboratory Equipment)
Patient access to pathology results (Pulse+IT)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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