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Dear PAMA member,

As 2014 winds down to a close, the staff of PAMA and myself thank you for a year full of fond memories and exciting accomplishments. We appreciate the opportunity to represent such a vital component of the aviation field and industry. We wish you a happy holiday season and all the best for you and your family in the coming year.

Below are the top stories from the past year for you to look over.

Regards,
Dale Forton




1. The daring Virginia teen and his flying machine created plenty of memories
The Daily Progress
From Nov. 5: It's amazing what some people can do when they don't realize they shouldn't be able to do it. Robert Tucker Belew serves as a classic example. A few weeks before Christmas 1955, he sat down with Boyce Loving, a reporter with The Daily Progress, and told him a remarkable story. Belew was 14 years old in 1923, when he came down with a severe case of flying fever. Like many people at the time, the Crozet, Virginia, youngster had become fascinated by the notion of flight.
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2. Questions continue about lithium batteries
AVweb
From Aug. 13: New rules recently have addressed the safety of shipping lithium batteries in air cargo, but a recent newspaper story raised questions about their use in electronic devices in the cockpit of passenger airplanes. "Because many airlines are replacing paper charts with laptops and tablet computers, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration conducted tests on what would happen if one of their rechargeable lithium-ion battery cells ignited," according to news report.
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BASF provides light weight solution for noise reduction in aircraft
BASF Corporation America
BASF Aerospace Materials responds to rising demands for improved noise reduction with the easy to install lightweight Basotect® UL melamine foam for thermal and acoustic insulation in sidewall panels and bulkhead structures. Basotect is a flexible, open cell foam with high sound absorbing capacity, good thermal insulation properties and an ultra-low density of 6 g/l (0.37 lb/ft3).
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Promoted by BASF Corporation America


3. Mooney launches diesel-powered M10 2-seater
FLYING
From Nov. 19: After weeks of rumors surrounding a possible new airplane design from Mooney International, the recently resurrected legacy airplane manufacturer announced at Airshow China 2014 in Zhuhai that it is developing a line of two-seat airplanes named the M10 series. The new series will start out with the M10T and M10J models, both powered by Continental diesel engines. Both will also feature the same sleek composite fuselage design with the trademark forward canted vertical stabilizer that makes identifying Mooney airplanes easy.
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4. 787 having problems with unfinished work from South Carolina
Aviation Pros
From June 25: Boeing paid out big bonuses to its South Carolina workforce for meeting an early deadline to significantly reduce the amount of unfinished 787 Dreamliner work traveling to Everett. But an unusual production mishap on the 787 assembly line in Everett two days earlier reveals a continued problem with incomplete fuselage sections from South Carolina, according to employees with knowledge of what happened.
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5. Coalition of aviation groups sends 'serious' petition to FAA
Aviation Pros via ARSA
From Sept. 24: Recently, a coalition of aviation trade associations asked the Federal Aviation Administration to fix a seven-letter mistake in the Code of Federal Regulations that would create serious headaches for the aviation maintenance industry. The group, which includes the Aeronautical Repair Station Association, the Aerospace Industries Association, the Aircraft Electronics Association, Airlines for America, the Cargo Airline Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the National Air Carrier Association, petitioned the FAA to correct the new repair station rule.
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6. SpaceShipTwo pilot reveals details of crash to NTSB
USA TODAY
From Nov. 19: The pilot of SpaceShipTwo, which broke up above California's Mojave Desert last month, says he was unaware that his co-pilot had prematurely unlocked a crucial braking system moments before the fatal crash, federal investigators said. Pilot Peter Siebold told the National Transportation Safety Board he was thrown free of the vehicle when it broke up and that his parachute automatically deployed.
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7. Michigan woman recalls time as fighter plane mechanic during WWII
The Flint Journal
From July 9: Jewell Frances Chandler had never driven a car before she learned to fix the airplanes that would help win WWII. Now 91 and living in Flint, Michigan, she grew up on a farm in Missouri. She grew up to be a teacher in a one-room school house. It was a different world then, one where, if she got sick, there was no such thing as substitute teaching. School was just canceled. In 1943, her mother walked to town and signed her up for the Navy. It was something she wanted. When school was out for summer, she left her life on the farm and went to New York for boot camp.
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8. The 10 worst flight delays in history
Jalopnik
From Feb. 26: If your plane gets delayed due to weather, that's bad luck. If it's a mechanical issue, you start worrying. If it's because of some lazy people, you're angry. But here are 10 delays worse than all of that.
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9. Why extreme cold is causing extreme problems for the airlines
Forbes
From Jan. 8: There's no question that the problems for the airliens in the last few days have been extreme. with JetBlue, American, Delta and most of the major airlines reporting large numbers of cancellations and delays, the scenes at many airports have been described as chaotic.
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10. 787 fire repair boosts composites confidence
Aviation Week
From March 5: On the morning of July 12, 2013, the quiet atmosphere of Boeing's 787 Operations Control Center in Everett, Wash., was broken by a phone call from British Airways at London Heathrow Airport. The caller asked if Boeing knew there was smoke coming from a 787 parked at the airport.
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PAMA Mx News Watch
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ryan Clark, Transportation Editor, 202.684.7160   
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