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Fewer homeless veterans, but VA's deadline looms
Military Times
Navy veteran Darryl Riley spent almost 25 years in and out of homeless shelters before landing in the U.S. VETS' "Veterans in Progress" program earlier this spring. "This time feels totally different," the 55-year-old veteran said. "In the shelters, they're just putting a roof over your head, some food into you. Here, the accommodations are nicer, and they have employment programs to help get you trained for jobs.'
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 SURVEY


Veterans Association of America wants to know...

Do you think civilian physicians are prepared to assess military veterans and their medical needs?
  1. Yes, I believe they are.
  2. No, I think they are ill prepared.
  3. Depends on whether the physician has dealt with veterans in the past.
  4. It's hard to say since many civilian doctors are not well versed in diagnosing our illnesses.
  5. It's a tough call but for now I'm assessing my civilian doctors' intervention of me.

Click here to give Veterans Association of America your answer.


Respond today — survey results revealed in next week's VAA Dispatch.



 Benefits


Dueling retirement reform plans mean more time for debate
Military Times
The most important difference between the Senate and House military retirement reform plans may just be that they're different.
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DoD seeks to eliminate stigma for seeking mental health care
U.S. Department of Defense
The Defense Department wants service members to know there's no stigma in seeking mental health care, a DoD Health Affairs official said. "We want troops and their families to know DoD has great emphasis on gaining access to mental health care, reducing barriers and following where the research goes to provide them the best possible care," said Navy Capt. (Dr.) Michael J. Colston, psychiatrist and director of mental health policy, health services policy and oversight.
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 Employment


New bill could help vets find jobs
WCIA-TV
The Department of Veterans' Affairs says there are nearly 800,000 veterans in the state. Soon, they could have a better chance of finding jobs. There's a new bill, which could help. It would allow private employers to have hiring preferences for honorably discharged veterans without repercussion.
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Protect, serve and start a business: Resources for entrepreneurial veterans
Business.com
Each year, approximately 180,000 veterans are returning to civilian life. A number of these returning vets are looking into starting their own businesses. The qualities that veterans have developed — leadership, strong work ethic, ability to work with others — give them a leg up in terms of launching a business; in fact, in 2009, veteran-owned businesses made up 14 percent of all businesses in the U.S.
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 Medical/Health


The US Senate voted to allow veterans access to medical cannabis
Leafly
In an historic moment for the rights of veterans everywhere, the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee recently voted to approve an amendment that would allow doctors in the Department of Veteran Affairs to recommend medical marijuana to veterans. As we freshly emerge from observing Memorial Day and remembering all of those soldiers, both known and unknown, who have fought and died for our country, we are reminded that we have to take care of those soldiers still with us, which is why this amendment is so powerful.
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Survey finds civilian physicians feel underprepared to treat veterans
American Osteopathic Association via Medical Xpress
A survey of nearly 150 U.S. physicians who frequently treat veterans found civilian doctors aren't adequately trained in health issues related to military service, according to research published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. More than half of the respondent indicated they were not comfortable discussing health-related exposures and risks that veterans might experience, such as depleted uranium, smoke and chemical weapons.
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 Education


Texas lawmakers can't agree, won't change veterans' benefit
The Associated Press via The Washington Times
Texas House and Senate negotiators can't agree — and therefore won't change — a program offering free college tuition to veterans and their children, even amid concerns it's too expensive to be sustainable. Sen. Brian Birdwell said there are "irreconcilable" differences on how to change the Hazlewoood Act.
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Trade secrets on how 1 master's program attracts veterans
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Despite the uptick in veteran employment, a considerable number of veterans and their family members are still choosing to pursue a college degree. More than half of veterans who began using their GI Bill benefits between 2002 and 2010 went on to earn a postsecondary degree or certificate by June 2013. This is good news considering more than three quarters of the jobs in the next 10 years will require a college degree.
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Study: Bomb blasts may cause early aging in brains of troops
USA Today
Veterans Affair scientists have discovered signs of early aging in the brains of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans caught near roadside bomb explosions, even among those who felt nothing from the blast. Years after coming home from war, veterans are showing progressive damage to the brain's wiring, according to a study published online in Brain, A Journal of Neurology.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Tricare changes, new fees rejected by Senate committee (Military Times)
Service group: Senate bill 'disappointing' on military benefits (The Hill)
VA to offer 1-stop website for all veterans benefits (Federal Times)
Vietnam vets' nightmares may unlock hidden link to dementia (Bloomberg Business)
Accenture to hire 5,000 US veterans by 2020 (Business Wire via MarketWatch)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 VAA Resources — Job search, grants, research

Get what you need with these resources available to veterans and family members.
Resource Website
VAA Resources Government, state, local, nonprofit and career information websites
VAA Military.com Career Expo
Military.com Career Expo — Register, view calendar
Military.com Veteran job search
 

VAA Dispatch
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608   
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