This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Feb. 21, 2013


 

From the editor's desk
Sachin Kapoor, DO, MBA, MPH, FACOEM (Secretary/Editor — WOEMA Newsletter)
Welcome to the second edition of our new electronic Newsletter. Our goals are to provide you with a behind the scenes look at what is happening at WOEMA, bring you current information that is pertinent to the practice of occupational and environmental medicine in the western United States, and to encourage your engagement within the organization.

In this edition you will find a spotlight on the work being done on your behalf by our Legislative Affairs Committee, WOEMA members that have made the national news, a new technology feature aimed at helping you leverage technology in your daily practice, information and registration instructions regarding our Feb. 27 CME webinar on Green Chemistry / Safer Alternatives, our Newsletter naming contest in which you can win a free WOHC 2013 registration to Honolulu, and much, much more.

If you are interested in getting involved within WOEMA or have questions/comments regarding the Newsletter, please email woema@woema.org.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




WOEMA NEWS

Committee spotlight: WOEMA Legislative Affairs Committee
Robert Blink, MD, MPH and Anne Searcy, MD (co-Chairs Legislative Affairs Committee)
WOEMA enters the 2013 legislative year with some heady results from 2012, combined with big challenges ahead. Here's a quick look:

E&M codes ground rules: Changes have been recommended with the goal of improving alignment of reimbursement with H&P elements relevant to Workers’ Compensation in California and elsewhere.

Calif.: Regulations related to SB 863 are being discussed and issued by the DWC; we are tracking and commenting. Independent Medical Review (IMR) and Independent Bill Review (IBR) are major implementation concerns. Resource-based relative value scale (RBRVS) is to start in January 2014. A webinar is tentatively planned for late 2013.

A bill has been proposed to track hazardous materials by requiring manufacturers and distributors to report customers to the California CDPH. We are tracking.

CURES (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) funding still not set — we are following.

Ariz.: An expert panel set up by the state legislative is looking at instituting Evidence Based Medicine in WC.

Hawaii: Committee members have started coordinating with legislative outreach to improve reimbursement.

Nev.: Legislation is under consideration to regulate telemedicine in WC; we are following.

Utah: No news –UT WOEMA members are heartily invited to join in our efforts to improve OEM health and practice in all 5 WOEMA states!

   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article

WOEMA members in the national news
WOEMA
WOEMA extends its most heartfelt congratulations to Dr. James Seward for his re-election to the ACOEM Board of Directors. Look for Dr. Seward's featured article in next month's Newlsetter. WOEMA is proud to announce that three of its members have been selected to ACOEM Fellowship. Congratulations to Dr. Monica L. Brown, Dr. Andrew H. Guo, and Dr. Peter Swann. They will be recognized as a member of the Fellows Class of 2013 at the elevation ceremony conducted at the Annual ACOEM Membership Meeting to be held during the American Occupational Health Conference in Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday, May 1. To learn more about ACOEM Fellowship, click here.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more

The Med Tech Corner with Dr. Dean Gean
Constantine J. Gean, MD, MBA, MS, FACOEM
To give your patients a feel for their medical condition and improve their compliance, a picture is worth a lot more than 1,000 words. 3D4Medical has very affordable apps for body parts typically treated by OEM doctors — these incredible illustration programs are for the physician who wants to explain in immediate and easily understandable visual terms what is going on under the skin. The illustrations (and procedure videos) move using 3-D technology and give instant anatomic understanding — part patient education, and part visualization tool, you can add or remove up to 13 layers of muscles, vessels, and nerves.

To learn more about the 3D4Medical apps, click here.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: The Texas privatized workers' comp model (Risk & Insurance)
Western Occupational Health Conference 2013 in Hawaii (WOEMA)
OSHA finds 58 violations at Nevada's Hoover Dam (The Associated Press via Fox News)
Why undocumented immigrants are turning to underground, cash-only clinics to get healthcare (ThinkProgress)
Flu shots for hospital workers enforced in US (The Associated Press via CBC News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.

Win a free registration to WOHC 2013 in Honolulu
WOEMA
To usher in our new electronic Newsletter, we are holding a contest. We are searching for a unique and interesting name for our WOEMA electronic Newsletter, and who better to ask than our members! The prize ... a free registration to WOHC 2013 in breathtaking Honolulu. So put on your thinking caps, get creative, and click here to submit your recommendations.

Don't wait. A winner will be chosen by the end of March and featured in our April 2013 Newsletter.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more

WOEMA CME webinar series
WOEMA
When: Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2013 at 12:00 p.m. PST
Topic: "Green Chemistry / Safer Alternatives: An Emerging Paradigm for Worker Protection?"
Presenter: Dennis Shusterman, MD, MPH
Section Chief within the Occupational Health Branch at the California Department of Public Health.
Registration is required for this meeting. Click here to register.

Webinar Description: Traditional regulatory approaches to chemical hazard control in the workplace rely upon permissible exposure limits (PELS). While the PEL approach is effective in many cases, rule-making has not kept pace with the introduction of new chemicals into commerce. Further, for some chemicals, worker intoxications continue to occur despite the adoption of rigorous standards. We examine three case studies of the failure of existing chemical policies to protect workers, and argue that substitution of safer alternatives is an under-utilized process. The participant will develop an appreciation for up-stream regulation as a complementary measure to PELs in worker protection.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more

Disaster preparedness & awareness guide for the Arizona Physician
WOEMA
The purpose of this guide is to educate practicing physicians and involved medical personnel so that they might be more knowledgeable about potential disasters and impart that understanding to their patients. Additionally, this guide helps physicians ready their practices and their homes for a potential disaster. The guide compiles relevant state and federal resources; thus, providing physicians with a document that lists credible sites for information, depending on the type of disaster. This guide is the result of the collaborative efforts of state and local government agencies and programs through membership in the Disaster Preparedness Task Force that was formed by the Arizona Medical Association.

Click here to view the guide.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
As sequester approaches, White House warns of rising occupational hazards
Bloomberg
If the sequestration budget cuts take effect March 1, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration could be forced to take its inspectors off the job "for some period of time," the White House recently. "This would mean roughly 1,200 fewer inspections of the nation's most dangerous workplaces, which would leave workers unprotected and could lead to an increase in worker fatality and injury rates," the White House said in a fact sheet listing the most damaging effects of sequestration.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Western Occupational Health Conference 2013 in Hawaii
WOEMA
Aloha! Winter weather have you dreaming of a tropical getaway? Make your plans to attend the WOHC 2013 conference, September 26 - 28 at the Sheraton Waikiki in Honolulu. This year's conference promises to be packed with interesting content, practical post-graduate sessions, unique worksite tours, stellar social activities and much more! You can make your hotel reservation now by calling 808-921-4611. Be sure to identify yourself with "WOEMA/Western Occupational Health Conference" in order to secure the negotiated group rate. Remember to visit the WOEMA website for regular program updates and more exciting details.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Study: The Texas privatized workers' comp model
Risk & Insurance
The argument for privatization in workers' compensation just got a boost. Employers who chose to privatize have seen lower costs, eradication of worries over fraud and abuse, and quicker resolution of disputes because workers' legal rights are restricted, according to a study by the New Street Group. Privatization even seems to help curb opioid abuse.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


INDUSTRY NEWS


Pesticides tied to type 2 diabetes
Newsmax Health
For the first time, environmental-health scientists have identified a direct link between pesticide chemicals and type 2 diabetes — a finding that may partly explain the dramatic rise in the health condition in recent decades. For the first time, environmental-health scientists have identified a direct link between pesticide chemicals and type 2 diabetes — a finding that may partly explain the dramatic rise in the health condition in recent decades. The study, led by University of Granada researchers in Spain, found people with higher concentrations of DDE — derived from the pesticide DDT — are four times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


As sequester approaches, White House warns of rising occupational hazards
Bloomberg
If the sequestration budget cuts take effect March 1, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration could be forced to take its inspectors off the job "for some period of time," the White House recently. "This would mean roughly 1,200 fewer inspections of the nation's most dangerous workplaces, which would leave workers unprotected and could lead to an increase in worker fatality and injury rates," the White House said in a fact sheet listing the most damaging effects of sequestration.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Obesity linked to lumbar disc degeneration
Medscape
Magnetic resonance imaging data show that obesity is associated with increased lumbar disc degeneration, according to a study published Jan. 30 in Arthritis & Rheumatism. Low back pain is a widespread and important cause of lost work time, diminished quality of life, and psychological distress. Lumbar disc degeneration, which can be readily observed by MRI, is known to be associated with LBP.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Geography to play bigger role in California health insurance costs
California Healthline
In California and across the nation, geography is expected to play a larger role in the cost of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, the AP/Sacramento Bee reports. Under the ACA, insurers no longer can deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions or place lifetime limits on medical care. They also cannot charge older policyholders more than three times what younger enrollees pay.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Silica rule changes delayed while workers face health risks
Arizona Public Radio
One of the oldest known workplace dangers is breathing in tiny bits of silica, which is basically sand. Even the ancient Greeks knew that stone cutters got sick from breathing in dust. And today, nearly two million American workers are exposed to silica dust in jobs ranging from construction to manufacturing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why immigration reform is a healthcare issue, too
The Associated Press via KNXV-TV
Critics of both the White House and U.S. Senate proposals to reform immigration suggest Washington has gone too far in offering what amounts to "amnesty" to millions of illegal residents. But immigrant advocates and public health officials think the proposals don't go far enough. Why is this a public health issue? Because the eventual path to citizenship doesn't include a path to Medicaid access. The White House's proposal also lacks a path to purchase subsidized health care coverage through the federal health overhaul law known as the Affordable Care Act. The Senate framework — introduced Jan. 28 by a bipartisan group of eight legislators — is silent on that issue.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US productivity fell at 2 percent rate
The Associated Press via Google News
U.S. worker productivity shrank in the final three months of 2012 although the decline was caused by temporary factors. Productivity contracted at an annual rate of 2 percent in the October-December quarter, the biggest drop since the first quarter of 2011, the Labor Department reported recently. Productivity had risen at a 3.2 percent rate in the July-September quarter.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Farm workers growing, but not eating healthy foods
Discovery News
Ironically, the farmhands who cultivate America's healthy fruits, veggies and grains may not be getting healthy food themselves. Ten percent of the cooking and eating facilities at migrant farm worker camps in North Carolina failed to comply with established regulations in a report published in the American Journal of Public Health.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

WOEMA eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Caleb Gremmer, Content Editor, 469.420.2648  
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the WOEMA eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
Feb. 21, 2013
Feb. 21, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063