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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 10, 2015

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NEWS FROM ACFAOM

Meet C. Keith Greer, Esq. - today at 9 p.m. ET
ACFAOM
Mr. Greer will be the guest on today's Meet the Masters audio-conference (at 9 p.m. ET) with host, and former ACFAOM president, Dr. Bret Ribotsky. Mr. Greer is an attorney who has been handling the legal needs of Podiatric Physicians for nearly twenty years, including professional liability defense, licensing board matters, Medicare and private insurance audits and hospital credentialing disputes. He is also on the General Counsel for the CPMA and an Adjunct Professor of Jurisprudence at the California School of Podiatric Medicine. To register for this FREE weekly, and unique, learning experience that will give you additional insights into the profession’s past and future click here.
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PROFESSION NEWS


Breaking bad: Ankle fracture study highlights mortality
Lower Extremity Review
Is ankle fracture in the elderly the new hip fracture? Hip fractures in older adults have often been linked to high mortality rates, and a recent study suggests the same may be true of ankle fractures, given that some of the same variables are at play.
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How effective is the gastroc recession for plantar fasciitis?
Podiatry Today
Gastrocnemius recession may be effective in reducing pain for patients with plantar fasciitis, according to a recent study. The study, published in Foot and Ankle Surgery, focused on 73 patients who received gastrocnemius recession as a single procedure between 2006 and 2011. Sixty-two patients reported a good or excellent result, 11 percent of patients reported a significant postoperative complication and 22 percent related having reduced or severely reduced plantarflexion power after surgery, according to the study.
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How ballet pumps could leave you limping or even missing a toe
Daily Mail
They're seen as a sensible yet stylish alternative to killer heels. But experts have warned that ballet pumps can lead to a host of health problems, from calluses and corns to collapsed arches. Now, a leading podiatric surgeon says the trend for ballet pumps is causing a rise in ingrown toenails.
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Telemedicine: Bringing diabetic foot care to the small screen
Lower Extremity Review
Many experts believe that comprehensive acceptance of telemedicine for preven­tion and monitoring of diabetic wounds and other lower extremity care is right around the corner. In 2005, Howard Umansky, DPM, of St. Petersburg, Florida, founded the Diabetic Rural Outreach Project (DROP International), which utilizes telemedicine to remotely monitor patients with diabetic wounds in China, the Caribbean, and the US. He started with relatively simple technology–furnishing basic computers with webcams and using services like Skype. Where no Internet was available, landline-linked videophones sufficed.
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Diabetic foot infections fall ... not
MedPage Today
The incidence of diabetic foot infections in the U.S. appears to have dropped by half in a 15-year period, but the numbers don't tell the whole story, a researcher said here. In 1996, diabetic foot infections were observed in every 2.3 of 100 diabetes-related discharges from hospitals in the U.S., compared with 1.1 per 100 discharges in 2010, said Bryson Duhon, PharmD, clinical assistant professor of pharmacy at the University of Texas at Austin.
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Brace yourself: 3-D printed ankle device promises to axe sprains
PSFK
Currently, athletes use conventional braces constructed with metal and nylon, or athletic tape, to immobilize their joints and prevent sprains. Unfortunately, traditional methods can be problematic; braces are often uncomfortable and restrict flexibility, while tape is difficult to apply, often irritates the skin and becomes expensive when used frequently. Most athletes are forced to shave their ankles prior to application and that process alone can be painful and time consuming.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    When should we refer a patient to a wound care center? (Podiatry Today)
Study finds Langer brace immediately improves balance among older adults (Lower Extremity Review)
Burnout grows among physicians (FiercePracticeManagement)
Feds to ease up on electronic health records program (The Hill)
Diabetes-related foot condition often missed (Winnipeg Free Press)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


1 in 5 younger diabetics lacks good medical care
WebMD
One in every five young American adults with diabetes hasn't seen a doctor in the past 6 months, a new government report indicates. The study, from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also found that those aged 18 to 39 with diabetes were much less likely than older patients to have gotten their blood pressure or cholesterol checked in the previous year.
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Tibialis anterior tendon transfer may prevent deformity relapse in idiopathic clubfoot
Orthopedics Today
Tibialis anterior tendon transfer prevented additional relapse of deformity in patients with idiopathic clubfoot without affecting long-term foot function, according to study results. Researchers obtained follow-up data for 35 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method from 1950 to 1967. Fourteen patients underwent tibialis anterior tendon transfer for clubfoot relapse during childhood and served as the study group, whereas 21 patients did not undergo a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and served as the reference group.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT PEARLS FROM AAPPM


Healthy conflict resolution for physicians
by Catherine Hambley, Ph.D. via Physician's Practice
It is not the presence of conflict that is critical; it is the ability to resolve it in a productive and healthy manner that matters most. We can't get away from it — almost everywhere you look, from the medical office to the hospital to home, wherever people are involved, conflict can erupt. So it is not the presence of conflict that is critical; it is the ability to resolve it in a productive and healthy manner that matters most. "Productive" means that the resolution leads to positive change. "Healthy" means that we are preserving, or even improving the relationship. Both are important. And if conflict is left unresolved, much like a wound that goes untreated, it can fester, grow, and lead to more damage.
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CURRENT RESEARCH ARTICLE OF INTEREST


The relationship between glycemic variability and diabetic peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes with well-controlled HbA1c
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome via PubMed
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes. Glycemic variability could be an independent risk factor for diabetes complications in addition to average glucose. Type 2 diabetes with well-controlled glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) may have different terms of glycemic variability and vascular complication consequences. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between glycemic variability and DPN in type 2 diabetes with well-controlled HbA1c.
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Foot & Ankle Weekly

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Julie Bernhard, Executive Editor, 469.420.2647  
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Disclaimer: Stories and advertisements from sources other than ACFAOM do not reflect ACFAOM's positions or policies and there is no implied endorsement by ACFAOM of any products or services. Content from sources other than that identified as being from ACFAOM appears in the Foot & Ankle Weekly to enhance readers' understanding of how media coverage shapes perceptions of podiatric orthopedics and medicine, and to educate readers about what their patients and other healthcare professionals are seeing in both professional journals and the popular press.

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