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NEWS FROM ACFAOM

ACFAOM's Certified Clinical Podiatric Medical Assistant Course
ACFAOM
ACFAOM recently launched the Certified Clinical Podiatric Medical Assistant (CCPMA) course. Partnering with Medinail Learning Center, ACFAOM now offers podiatric medical assistants the opportunity to learn important clinical background information about working with patients’ feet, and bringing them to a higher level of clinical expertise so they can provide more clinical support to the doctor, such as nail debridement and routine foot care. This course consists of ten online learning modules with two online exams. After passing the exams, an internship in a licensed podiatrist’s office is required and usually provided by the student’s employer podiatrist. On receiving verification that the student has had instruction on particular skills and finished the internship program, a certificate is awarded.

Click here to learn more about the course and to have your Assistant register online for $599. A $100 fee discount is available for Assistants taking this course if they are sponsored by an ACFAOM member.

PMAs and MNTs already certified by Medinails can also become an ACFAOM CCPMA by completing and passing the ACFAOM CCPMA Bridge Examination and paying a $75 exam fee.
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Meet Charles Lombardi, DPM - today at 9 p.m. ET
ACFAOM
Dr. Charles Lombardi will be the guest on today's Meet the Masters audio-conference (at 9 p.m. ET) with host, and former ACFAOM president, Dr. Bret Ribotsky. Dr.Lombardi is the President of the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners and Past-President of the American Board of Podiatric Surgery. He currently serves as Director of Podiatric Medical Education at New York Hospital Queens and Professor of Surgery at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. To register for this FREE weekly, and unique, learning experience that will give you additional insights into the profession's past and future click here.
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PROFESSION NEWS


New inexpensive treatment deals with problematic toenails
WWL-TV
If this unsightly ailment has you hiding your open-toe shoes, sandals and flip flops this summer, there may be some help. A doctor says his inexpensive toenail creation really works. It's a common ailment that's unpleasant to talk about. "Ten percent of everybody over 50 has these thick, ugly, toenails and they don't know what to do for it," said Dr. Paul Kinsinger, a family physician in Illinois.
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Study into causes of diabetic neuropathy underway
Diabetes.co.uk
Scientists in Yorkshire have launched a ground-breaking study to find the cause of diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). Diabetic neuropathy is long-term damage to the nerve fibres that occurs as a result of prolonged, high blood glucose levels, although exactly how this causes nerve damage is not fully understood.
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Sponsored Content


Aggressive care suggested for Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy
Orthopedics Today
Researchers of this study found foot deformities, such as cuboid height, progressed during a 2-year follow-up of patients with Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy. "[I]n patients with Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy, radiographic alignment measurements demonstrated the presence of foot deformity at the time of the initial clinical presentation," Mary K. Hastings, DPT, PT, MSCI, ATC, and colleagues wrote in their study.
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Health problems of wearing high heels
BoldSky
High heels have been observed since 3500 BC in Egyptian murals depicting the upper crest of the society wearing them. French males used high heels as a stopper to prevent slipping of feet from the stirrups of the saddle during horse riding. The term "well-heeled" which meant the rich and famous of those days came from here.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HIGH HEELS.


Looks like the US is winning its war on childhood obesity
The Washington Post
For decades, researchers watched the widening waistlines of America's children with alarm, as report after report indicated rising numbers of overweight kids. In response, programs were implemented, mandates imposed, and initiatives undertaken. Now, the studies are pouring in, and the results are encouraging: Obesity rates are leveling off and even dropping, in a sign that the public health crisis of the moment may have eased.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The top 10 innovations in podiatry (Podiatry Today)
Treating a runner with proximal plantar fasciitis, hip pain and a limb length discrepancy (Podiatry Today)
Shoe envy can cause a pain in the foot (CNN)
Effective cost management for your medical practice (Physician's Practice)
How should doctors share impossible decisions with their patients? (The New Yorker)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Comfy flip-flops can lead to foot problems
The Wichita Eagle
Summer is here and flip-flops - the airy sandal held on the foot solely by a simple band between the two biggest toes - are back in full force. And that means foot problems. Flips-flops come in a variety of styles and many women wear them both with their casual attire and with formal wear. But, while the popular footwear provides basic protection against hot pavement and catching athlete's foot, flip-flops offer nothing in the way of foot support.
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Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
By Maria Frisch
Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder of the peripheral nervous system, with an estimated prevalence of 17-40 out of 10,000. Common symptoms of this disorder include a progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, sensory loss, deformities of the extremities and drop foot. The pattern of inheritance can be either autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked. However, it is most often considered an autosomal dominant disorder due to the fact that 90 percent of the cases in this disease is inherited in this fashion.
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Treating a runner with proximal plantar fasciitis, hip pain and a limb length discrepancy
Podiatry Today
A 63-year-old, physically fit, active 5'10" male runner and longtime patient recently presented with a recurrent concern of left hip and heel pain. He has had this condition intermittently for two years with gradual pain onset and the pain varies with the type, amount and intensity of activity.
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Plantar pressure measurements reveal not all sham devices are created equal
Lower Extremity Review
Not all sham orthoses used in research settings provide the same mechanical effects or are perceived by study participants as equally credible, according to research epublished in May by the Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. Investigators from La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, recruited 30 healthy adults and collected in-shoe plantar pressure data at the heel, midfoot, and forefoot at zero and four weeks under five conditions: shoe alone; customized polypropylene orthosis; contoured polyethylene sham orthosis; contoured ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) sham orthosis; and flat EVA sham orthosis.
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CURRENT RESEARCH ARTICLE OF INTEREST


Foot type biomechanics part 1: Structure and function of the asymptomatic foot
Gait & Posture
Differences in foot structure are thought to be associated with differences in foot function during movement. Many foot pathologies are of a biomechanical nature and often associated with foot type. Fundamental to the understanding of foot pathomechanics is the question: do different foot types have distinctly different structure and function?
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Foot & Ankle Weekly

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Julie Bernhard, Sr. Content Editor, 469.420.2647  
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Disclaimer: Stories and advertisements from sources other than ACFAOM do not reflect ACFAOM's positions or policies and there is no implied endorsement by ACFAOM of any products or services. Content from sources other than that identified as being from ACFAOM appears in the Foot & Ankle Weekly to enhance readers' understanding of how media coverage shapes perceptions of podiatric orthopedics and medicine, and to educate readers about what their patients and other healthcare professionals are seeing in both professional journals and the popular press.

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