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PROFESSION NEWS


Study: Low back pain tied to flat feet
Reuters Health via Chicago Tribune
Women who walk with flat feet are 50 percent more likely than those with normal or high arches to have low back pain, a new study suggests. "The key takeaway from the study is that if women have low back pain, it may not be just the back," said senior author Marian Hannan of the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife in Boston.
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The challenge of diabetes for doctor and patient
The New York Times
Dr. Danielle Ofri writes, "My patient was miserable — parched with thirst, exhausted and jumping up to go to the bathroom every few minutes. His vision was blurry and he’d been losing weight the last few weeks, despite eating voraciously. I'd only just met him, but I was able to diagnose diabetes in about a minute. What was unusual was that this was a scheduled office visit; usually, patients with such overwhelming symptoms are the provenance of emergency departments and urgent care centers."
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SPONSORED CONTENT


How weightbearing CT can be a valuable diagnostic tool
Podiatry Today
When evaluating the patient with metatarsalgia, there are many anatomic and biomechanical factors to consider: first ray hypermobility, metatarsal length, metatarsal elevation and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) stability (plantar plate). One may use traditional weightbearing radiographs to evaluate metatarsal length but they cannot assess metatarsal sagittal plane position. Sesamoid axial views can evaluate the metatarsal head sagittal plane position but such radiographs are not reliable as the patient or the X-ray technician positions the foot in a way that clearly does not represent a resting stance position.
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Achilles pain, poor glute control linked
Runner's World
Over the last few years, sports medicine professionals examining injuries have increasingly looked at what they call the kinetic chain, or the body parts that work together during an athletic movement. (In layperson's terms, the hip bone's connected to the knee bone, and so on.) For example, it's now widely believed that hip weakness and instability increases the risk of developing runner's knee.
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What's the worst shoe for your feet?
Refinery29
We all know that high heels aren't the best thing for our feet, but we probably don't want to give up their stylish effect entirely. So, if you're looking to maintain your adorable wardrobe, but want to minimize the detrimental health effects of those sky-high stilettos, what should you wear?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SHOES.


One-third of US adults are obese
KTTC-TV
The adult obesity rate in the United States remains as high as ever, with one in three Americans carrying unhealthy amounts of weight, according to a new federal report. The obesity rate has remained essentially unchanged for a decade, despite the large amount of attention focused on its threat to public health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Effectiveness of local tenoxicam vs. corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis treatment (Orthopedics Today)
Why partial first ray amputations in patients with diabetic neuropathy do not work (Podiatry Today)
The Affordable Care Act: They gave it the wrong name (By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan)
Study: US physician payments vary widely, mysteriously (Reuters)
The effect of unstable sandals on instability in gait in healthy female subjects (Gait & Posture)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Number of diabetic amputations 'unacceptable'
Derby Telegraph
The number of diabetic patients in parts of the county who are forced to undergo amputations is too high, according to campaigners. National charity Diabetes UK says the number of major amputations in southern Derbyshire is higher than the national average – and the eighth highest in the country.
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Physician burnout: No one cares — but you should
By Dr. Jonathan Kaplan
Have you read the articles over the last several months about physician burnout and fatigue? I’ll admit that as someone in the physician fishbowl, I’m on the inside and hear a lot about physician burnout that most of the public may not see. Doctors are upset and having significant emotional distress because of their chosen field, but many people don’t seem concerned. The problem is that the burned-out physician with fatigue and the resulting lack of focus can most certainly affect all of us.
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CURRENT RESEARCH ARTICLE OF INTEREST


Control of the motion of the body's center of mass in relation to the center of pressure during high-heeled gait
Gait & Posture
High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. Knowledge of the motion of the body's center of mass (COM) with respect to the center of pressure (COP) during high-heeled gait may offer insights into the balance control strategies and provide a basis for approaches that minimize the risk of falling and associated adverse effects.
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Foot & Ankle Weekly

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Julie Bernhard, Editorial Development Manager, 469.420.2647  
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Disclaimer: Stories and advertisements from sources other than ACFAOM do not reflect ACFAOM's positions or policies and there is no implied endorsement by ACFAOM of any products or services. Content from sources other than that identified as being from ACFAOM appears in the Foot & Ankle Weekly to enhance readers' understanding of how media coverage shapes perceptions of podiatric orthopedics and medicine, and to educate readers about what their patients and other healthcare professionals are seeing in both professional journals and the popular press.

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