This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.

  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe
Home   Conferences   Member Center   Publications   Policies   Career Development June. 14, 2011
Science in the News


Study provides epidemiology of fatal occupational traumatic brain injury in the US
The Medical News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, work-related TBI has not been well documented. In a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers describe the epidemiology of fatal TBI in the U.S. workplace between 2003 and 2008. More



New substances added to HHS Report on Carcinogens
National Institutes of Health    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services added eight substances to its Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemicals and biological agents that may put people at increased risk for cancer. The industrial chemical formaldehyde and a botanical known as aristolochic acids are listed as known human carcinogens. Six other substances - captafol, cobalt-tungsten carbide (in powder or hard metal form), certain inhalable glass wool fibers, o-nitrotoluene, riddelliine, and styrene - are added as substances that are reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens. With these additions, the 12th Report on Carcinogens now includes 240 listings. More

Inducible nitric oxide synthase genetic polymorphism and risk of asbestosis
PubMed    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Asbestos, a known occupational pollutant, may upregulate the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and thus the production of nitric oxide (NO). This study investigated whether iNOS (CCTTT)(n) polymorphism is associated with an increased asbestosis risk in exposed workers. The study cohort consisted of 262 cases with asbestosis and 265 controls with no asbestos-related disease. For each subject the cumulative asbestos exposure data were available. The number of CCTTT repeats was determined following PCR amplification of the iNOS promoter region. Logistic regression was performed to estimate asbestosis risk. The OR of asbestosis was 1.20 (95 percent  CI = 0.85-1.69) for the LL genotype compared to the combined SL and SS genotypes and 1.26 (95 percent  CI = 0.86-1.85) for the LL genotype compared to the SL genotype. The results of this study are borderline significant and suggest a possible role of iNOS (CCTTT)(n) polymorphism in the risk of asbestosis; however, further studies are needed. More

Pressure to work when sick has long term negative effects
Medical News Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Pressure to work through periods of short term sickness (known as "presenteeism") can have long term negative effects on health and productivity, warns an editorial published on bmj.com. More

An updated historical cohort mortality study of workers exposed to asbestos in a refitting shipyard, 1947-2007
PubMed    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term health effects of occupational asbestos exposure, an updated historical cohort mortality study of workers at a refitting shipyard was undertaken. More

CHR is here, there, everywhere!

CHR is the company you call for all your corporate health examination needs for your scattered employees throughout the U.S., Canada and any other international locations.
MORE


Occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields while working at switching and transforming stations of 110 kV
The Annals of Occupational Hygiene    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The aim of the study was to measure occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during various work tasks at switching and transforming stations of 110 kV (in some situations 20 kV), and analyze if the action values of European Union Directive 2004/40/EC or reference values of International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were exceeded. More

Cardiovascular disease in US firefighters: A systematic review
PubMed    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of on-duty death among firefighters (45 percent of on-duty fatalities) and a major cause of morbidity. CVD in the fire service also has adverse public safety implications as well as significant cost impacts on government agencies. Over the last decade, our understanding of CVD among firefighters has significantly improved and provides insight into potential preventive strategies. The physiology of cardiovascular arousal and other changes that occur in association with acute firefighting activities have been well-characterized. However, despite the strenuous nature of emergency duty, firefighters' prevalence of low fitness, obesity, and other CVD risk factors are high. More

Stress-defeating effects of exercise traced to emotional brain circuit
National Institute of Mental Health    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Evidence in both humans and animals points to emotional benefits from exercise, both physical and mental. Now, in recent experiments with mice, scientists have traced the stress-buffering effect of activity to a brain circuit known to be involved in emotional regulation as well as mood disorders and medication effects. The finding is a clue to understanding the neurological roots of resilience, key to developing new means of prevention and treatment for stress-related illness. More

Sampling of urinary cadmium: differences between 24-h urine and overnight spot urine sampling, and impact of adjustment for dilution
PubMed    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Urinary cadmium (U-Cd) sampling can be done either by 24-h urine or spot urine sampling, and adjustment for dilution is usually needed. The choice of sampling period and adjustment technique could, however, potentially induce bias. The aim of the study was to compare 24-h urine and spot urine sampling and two dilution adjustment techniques, when assessing U-Cd. More
Science in the News is brought to you as an information service. The articles contained herein do not necessarily represent the views of ACOEM.
Science in the News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2633   Download media kit
Jennifer Maddox, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2613   Contribute news
Disclaimer: ACOEM does not warrant or make any representation as to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, advertised products, or other materials on this electronic newsletter.
Recent issues
June 7, 2011
May 31, 2011
May 24, 2011
May 17, 2011

This edition of the Science in the News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.
Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!


7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063