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ACRM NEWS

Share your conference photos with ACRM
ACRM
If you are a shutterbug and attended the 91st Annual Conference last week in Toronto, ACRM wants you! More specifically, ACRM wants your photos. Contact the ACRM Marketing Department at graphics@ACRM.org to share your favorites for use on ACRM.org, and in ACRM advertising and publications. Simply forward your digital images and we'll take it from there. Thank you.

To check out some of the pictures we already have from ACRM 2014 go to our Facebook page.
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ACRM 2015 call for proposals
ACRM
Everything is bigger in Dallas! As ACRM 2014 wraps up in Toronto we are already looking ahead to 2015 in Dallas. The 2015 Program Committee invites proposals focused on research evidence and its translation into clinical practice. ACRM is especially interested in the following diagnoses and focus areas: Brain Injury, Cancer Rehabilitation, Neurodegenerative Disease, Pain, Spinal Cord Injury, and Stroke. Proposals that are interdisciplinary in nature, or include international or early career presenters are encouraged.
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Call for nominations for the 2015 Robert L. Moody Prize
ACRM
Nominations for the Robert L. Moody Prize, presented by the UTMB Health School of Health Professions, the Transitional Learning Center of Galveston, are due 1 December. The Prize recognizes individuals or groups who have made significant contributions to the advancement of clinical research related to acquired brain injury, the improvement of treatment and increasing awareness of the need for rehabilitation following brain injury. The award consists of a commemorative keepsake and an honorarium of $10,000.
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Special thanks to our sponsors
ACRM
CARF International; Craig Hospital; Indiana University and RHI's University Physiatric Associates; Johns Hopkins Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Rehabilitation; Mayo Clinic; Mount Sinai Brain Injury Research Center; Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago; Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana; Rusk Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Medical Center; Shepherd Center; Spaulding Rehabilitation Network; Stony Brook University School of Health Technology and Management; Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital; and TIRR Memorial Hermann
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CALENDAR OF EVENTS


Date Event More Information
15 December
ACRM 2015 Call for Proposals: Instructional Course proposals due
More info
15 January
ACRM 2015 Call for Proposals: Symposia proposals due
More info
2 March
ACRM 2015 Call for Proposals: Scientific papers & poster proposals due
More info


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Stroke victims lose 'crucial functions' because hospitals don't properly rehabilitate them (Medical Daily)
Breast cancer patients find that acupuncture has 'shocking' health benefits (The Mercury)
Should passive physical agents be eliminated under new APTA guidelines? (By Heidi Dawson)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


INSIDE THE ARCHIVES


Investigating measures of intensity during a structured upper limb exercise program in stroke rehabilitation: An exploratory study
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Researchers used measures of intensity — time, observed repetitions and wrist accelerometer activity counts — to describe the intensity of exercise carried out when completing a structured upper limb exercise program, and to explore whether a relationship exists between wrist accelerometer activity counts and observed repetitions.
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Efficacy of addition of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to standardized physical therapy in subacute spinal spasticity: A randomized controlled trial
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
This study examined the immediate and short-term efficacy of adding transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to standardized physical therapy on subacute spasticity within six months of spinal cord injury.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Share your conference photos with ACRM
ACRM
If you are a shutterbug and attended the 91st Annual Conference last week in Toronto, ACRM wants you! More specifically, ACRM wants your photos. Contact the ACRM Marketing Department at graphics@ACRM.org to share your favorites for use on ACRM.org, and in ACRM advertising and publications. Simply forward your digital images and we'll take it from there. Thank you.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
ACRM 2015 call for proposals
ACRM
We are already looking ahead to 2015 in Dallas. The 2015 Program Committee invites proposals focused on research evidence and its translation into clinical practice. ACRM is especially interested in the following diagnoses and focus areas: Brain Injury, Cancer Rehabilitation, Neurodegenerative Disease, Pain, Spinal Cord Injury, and Stroke.

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read more
New opportunities for physical therapy
San Diego Jewish Journal
When you think about physical therapy, you probably think: chronic back pain or car accident. If you're dealing with incontinence or sexual dysfunction, you either think: urologist, gynecologist or Google. But there's an emerging physical therapy practice that examines the roots of these problems through the muscles in the pelvic floor, and it's one that many medical doctors and their patients are just starting to understand.

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AROUND THE INDUSTRY


How to train your staff on direct access
WebPT
Direct access means that a patient can seek physical therapy services without a physician's referral. That's not only empowering for the patient, but also for you as a private practice therapy provider — and what better time to feel empowered than National Physical Therapy Month. That being said, physical therapists aren't capitalizing on direct access for a number of reasons. But patients aren't helping either.
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Virtual reality simulator makes strides in physical therapy
KOBR-TV
VideoBrief Virtual reality may be the future for video games but it can also help people with disabilities increase their independence. A new simulator at the University of South Florida is already making strides. The computer assisted rehabilitation environment, CAREN for short, gives researchers the chance to study and help with the development of physical therapy.
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BRAIN INJURY


Researchers discover two potential treatments for traumatic brain injury
University of Adelaide via The Medical News
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered two potential treatments for traumatic brain injury that are most effective when given at different stages after the injury has occurred. Laboratory studies conducted in the University's School of Medical Sciences have confirmed that changes in brain water channels over time play a critical role in traumatic brain injury. Researchers tested two compounds that alter the natural flow of water activity in and out of the brain. They found that recovery from brain injury can be greatly assisted when these compounds are given at the right times.
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SPINAL CORD INJURY


Clinical trial for dogs could help humans
WHO-TV
VideoBrief Doctors at Iowa State University's Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center are conducting a clinical trial for dogs with severe spinal cord injuries. Using a treatment called Chondroitinase, they attempt to break down the scar tissue in the spinal cord to nerves a chance to regenerate after injury. All get free physical therapy while at the medical center. The International Spinal Research Trust is sponsoring the trial in hopes the treatment could one day benefit humans.
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STROKE


Boy with rare paralyzing disease has brain 'rewired'
TODAY
Zeke Hembree, an energetic 8-year-old from Tennessee, was born with a crippling genetic condition so rare, there's no name for it. At only 8 months old, Zeke was paralyzed from the waist down by a spinal cord stroke. By 7, he had a more serious brain stroke that nearly took his speech and use of his arms. Now, a year after complex surgery at the Cleveland Clinic to "rewire" his brain's blood vessels, his physical therapy sessions have been cut back from weekly to once a month. Doctors hope Zeke's condition can help them identify and treat other children with ACTA2, as it is known.
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NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE


UD, Accudyne create harness for physically disabled
The News Journal
Technology created in a University of Delaware laboratory and built by Accudyne Systems Inc. of Newark, New Jersey, is designed to help people who have suffered head injuries, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease or a stroke progress to regain stability, balance and strength. The kiosk includes a harness system that allows users to move around anywhere within a 50-square-foot space. There’s a quick-release in back, in case the user wants to sit down.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword: Stability.


PAIN


Pain relief on top: Guided tour of hot/cold therapy and topical treatment products that provide targeted pain relief at the surface
PT Products
In recent years, the desire for alternative methods of pain relief has skyrocketed. Individuals seeking pain relief today have more options than ever — anything from oral NSAIDs to the newly popular topical analgesics, and hot and cold contrast wraps. This article explores the full range of pain-management products currently on the market — from therapeutic tape to iontophoresis — and explores the advantages of each in providing effective pain relief.
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CANCER


Resistance training helps cancer survivors
Yuma News
Research shows that cancer survivors may benefit from weight training. Resistance training is exercise that uses weights, weight machines or elastic bands. The study looked at both men and women who were being treated or had completed treatment for cancer. Early results after 12 weeks showed that participants increased muscle mass and decreased body fat. After one year, the effects continued with participants reporting a positive effect on their quality of life with a notable decrease in cancer-related fatigue, which is a common and long-lasting symptom reported in cancer survivors.
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