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In this issue:

Season's Greetings from ACSM
Active Voice: Guidance for Athletes Who Manipulate Body Weight
New Scholarship Offered Will Recognize Editors-In-Chief of ACSM Journals
Policy Corner: ACSM Fitness Resolution: Every Body Walk!
Call for Nominations: FASEB Excellence in Science Award
Happy Holidays from ACSM ceOnline
Member Benefit: Office Depot Savings Program
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines
 
 


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Season's Greetings from ACSM

The American College of Sports Medicine wishes you a happy and healthy holiday and new year!



Note: SMB will run two special holiday issues on Dec. 24 and Dec. 31, and will return to its usual format on Jan. 8.


Active Voice: Guidance for Athletes Who Manipulate Body Weight
By Jacqueline R. Berning, Ph.D., RD, CSSD and Craig A. Horswill, Ph.D.
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.


Jacqueline Berning is a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs. Currently she is the sport dietitian for the University of Colorado football and basketball teams. She also is a member of US Lacrosse Sports Science and Safety Committee. Dr. Berning has won numerous teaching awards at the university and her research focus is on nutritional requirements for athletic performance.

Craig Horswill is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition at the University of Illinois Chicago. He has long been interested in acute weight manipulation in athletes, having conducted research on the topic while on the faculties of Ball State University and The Ohio State University, and as an employee with Gatorade. He served on the writing committee for the 2011 NATA position statement on safe weight loss in sport.

The following commentary reflects Dr. Berning’s and Dr. Horswill’s views relating to topics addressed in the ACSM Team Physician Consensus Statement on Selected Issues for Nutrition and the Athlete that appears in the December 2013 issue of
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise® (MSSE).

Athletes often use extreme means to manipulate their body weight in an attempt to gain competitive advantages. Such practices can endanger health and well-being. Several health care organizations have issued position statements that provide coaches, athletes, parents, team physicians, sport dietitians, athletic trainers and exercise physiologists with guidelines and tools for best practices on this matter.

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New Scholarship Will Recognize Editors-In-Chief of ACSM Journals

To recognize and continue the great legacies of an integral part of the ACSM publications — the journals’ editors-in-chief — ACSM is pleased to announce the inaugural Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Recognition Scholarship Program. The EICs for Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise® (MSSE®) and Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews (ESSR) officially ended their terms this year. The outgoing EICs were invited to award a $1,000 scholarship to a student or institution of their choice.

Outgoing MSSE EIC Andrew Young, Ph.D., FACSM, selected awardee Cadet Harrison Kee, who will graduate in the spring of 2014. Mr. Kee will be one of the first Virginia Military Institute graduates to be awarded a minor in Exercise Science, a new program at VMI.

The late Priscilla Clarkson, Ph.D., FACSM, outgoing ESSR EIC, awarded the scholarship to the Commonwealth Honors College and designated it to be used for undergraduate student research grants in kinesiology.

Scholarships will also be awarded when there is an outgoing EIC for the other two ACSM journals, Current Sports Medicine Reports and ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal®. To find out more about ACSM's official journals, visit the journals online*: * Access to journal content varies by member type. ACSM members should first log into their account at the ACSM website (www.acsm.org). Once logged in, click the “Access My Journals” link in the red box. Click on the journal on the next page.

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Policy Corner: ACSM Fitness Resolution: Every Body Walk!

Editor's note: The following has been widely distributed as a news release. Members are encouraged to share it with individuals, organizations or media to promote walking, walkability and healthy lifestyles.

Around the start of each new year, advice abounds to help people adopt healthier lifestyles. The American College of Sports Medicine offers science-based guidelines: adults should get 150 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity to maintain health; double that to lose weight. Kids need an hour almost every day. (For details, see Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.) Given that physical activity has been shown to help prevent and treat more than 40 chronic diseases, let’s resolve to help everyone get a healthy dose.

This year’s advice focuses on how to achieve those physical activity goals, involving individuals, families, communities, workplaces and other organizations, and carves out a role for Congress as well. ACSM is a lead partner in the burgeoning collaborative known as Every Body Walk!, which touts walking and walkability for health and a slew of other reasons: economics, environmental benefits, student achievement and more. Walking (and rolling, for those who use wheelchairs) is available to nearly everyone, costs nothing, and integrates easily into everyday life. These points were made abundantly clear at the recent 2013 Walking Summit, where Dr. Bob Sallis, Past President of ACSM, reported the discovery of a "wonder drug” for many of today's most common medical problems: "The drug is called walking...its generic name is physical activity."

Resolved: Walk More!
While guidelines from ACSM and the CDC suggest a combination of regular aerobic exercise, strength training and flexibility activities, walking offers an easy and accessible way to start. Even those who are sedentary and unfit can begin by walking a bit more each day. Studies show that 10-minute bouts of exercise bring health benefits, and it becomes easier and more enjoyable as you fit it into your daily routine. Walking can provide solitude, connection with your surroundings, or quality time with others. (Tip: Dog owners walk more, in addition to enjoying the companionship.) Experts suggest parking a bit further away, taking the stairs, walking to a co-worker’s desk instead of emailing across the room, and finding other strategies to work walking into your activities of daily life. Try it – it’s contagious!

Resolutions for Everyone
Individuals and families can do much to increase their own walking, but the movement doesn’t stop there. The Every Body Walk! collaborative involves non-profit organizations, employers, and government agencies. Companies hold walking meetings and encourage workplace wellness; churches stage congregational walks; educators support walking to school and class sessions on foot. Public officials hold the keys to fostering walkable communities through zoning laws, Complete Streets policies and safe neighborhoods that allow residents to be out and active.

Congress – despite other issues that divide the body – can unite over the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Act, which calls for regular review and updating of physical activity guidelines as is done with nutritional guidelines. Legislation encouraging trails, paths and walkable neighborhoods are icing on the cake.

Gifts that Last, but Cost Little
Sure, give your loved ones that treadmill, workout video, bicycle or gym membership, and encourage them to keep at it throughout the year; but remember to also do what you can to add more walking to daily life. You’ll feel better, enjoy improved health and fitness, and share all the co-benefits with your family and community. The mantra for 2014: Every Body Walk!

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Call for Nominations: FASEB Excellence in Science Award

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, of which ACSM is a member society, is seeking nominations for its 2015 Excellence in Science Award that recognizes the significant accomplishments of women scientists. We look forward to another list of nominees that reads like a ‘Who’s Who’ of international science, containing the names of outstanding women in science who have accomplished scientific work of lasting impact and have contributed substantially to training the next generation of scientists.

Nominators and their candidates must be members of a FASEB member society. Self-nominations will not be accepted. All nominations must be submitted on the FASEB Excellence in Science Award website. Access to the site will be available as of January 1, 2014 by clicking here. Nominations must be submitted on the FASEB award website by March 1, 2014.

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To find out how to feature your company in the ACSM News Digest and other advertising opportunities, Contact Tom Crist at 972-402-7724

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Happy Holidays from ACSM ceOnline

As 2013 comes to an end, we would like to share three new CEC bundle offers with our valued customers. You can view them at www.onlinelearning-acsm.org.

Don't forget, as an ACSM member, you have access to an additional 24 CECs per year through ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal.

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Member Benefit: Office Depot Savings Program

ACSM has partnered with Office Depot® to bring members a national discount program. You can save up to 80% off preferred products. Shop online or in stores and receive free next-day delivery on orders over $50 (excludes furniture orders). To shop online or print your savings card, click here.
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SPORTS MEDICINE & EXERCISE SCIENCE HEADLINES

Headlines include recent stories in the media on sports medicine and exercise science topics and do not reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. Headlines are meant to inform members on what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


Exercise is a Positive Prescription for Child Cancer Survivors
Sacramento Bee
Parks full of children playing baseball, tossing Frisbees and romping around a playground are as American as apple pie. Childhood cancer survivors can be among those active youngsters, reaping the benefits of exercise and youth sports by following post-treatment guidelines and keeping their doctors informed.

Exercise can even play a role during the treatment of some cancers. Physical activity is known to increase energy, improve mood, boost self-esteem, stimulate the immune system and reduce symptoms of pain, diarrhea and constipation. Post treatment exercise can reduce the risk of cardiovascular effects, low bone density and obesity, and overall improve a child or teen survivor's quality of life.

"Physical activity is important for pediatric cancer survivors' health and emotional well being," said Pam Gabris, a nurse and the Beyond the Cure coordinator for The National Children's Cancer Society (NCCS). "Parents should work closely with their child's doctors to gauge how much physical activity is right for their child, and monitor exercise programs and athletic involvement to maximize the benefits and monitor the child for late-term effects."

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Exercising During Cold Weather
San Angelo Standard Times
You’ve tried running on the treadmill or walking laps on an indoor track, but found your workout more fulfilling when you ditched the gym walls for the great outdoors. But, when the colder months come along, don’t let your motivation to exercise drop along with the temperature. Use the following tips to keep yourself safe and warm while continuing your exercise routine during inclement weather.

Dress in layers

Dressing in appropriate clothing and layers helps fend off the cold and retain body heat. The American College of Sports Medicine suggests three different types of layers:

Base layer: The base layer should be a synthetic material (polypropylene or polyester). This material helps wick moisture from the skin, keeps you dry and doesn’t let body heat escape. This layer should fit snugly, but not constrict your movement.

Middle layer: The ideal material for the middle layer is fleece. Fleece is quick to dry and still keeps you insulated and warm. The fit should be the same as the base layer— snug, but still allows movement.

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Sports Medicine Bulletin

Sports Medicine Bulletin is a membership benefit of the American College of Sports Medicine. There is no commercial involvement in the development of content or in the editorial decision-making process for this weekly e-newsletter. The appearance of advertising in Sports Medicine Bulletin does not constitute ACSM endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertising. ACSM does not control where the advertisements appear or any coincidental alignment with content topic.

Tom Crist, Sales Director, 972.402.7724   
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Steven Brittain, Director of Publishing, 469.420.2625
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