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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          January 27, 2015

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ASHA NEWS

Register now for the February webinar on heroin prevention
ASHA
Registration is now open for Prevention is Powerful: Heroin and the Teen Brain which is scheduled on Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 2 p.m. ET. Presented by Kris Adzia, MS, Director of Education; and Rosanne Tenuta, Health Educator, Heroin Prevention Program Facilitator, Robert Crown Center for Health Education (RCC), this session will explores the Heroin Prevention Program developed by the RCC. The webinar qualifies for 1.0 Category I CECH; 1.0 CNE Contact Hour and 1.0 Certificate of Attendance. ASHA Members receive continuing education credit free of charge. Non-members must purchase CE credit for $30. Click here to purchase.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Study finds popular anti-bullying program may have mixed results
Phys.Org
A curriculum that is widely used by U.S. schools to diminish bullying and other forms of aggression shows promise at reducing gender- and sexual-based violence. However, the program's efficacy may vary between geographic regions, and it may not directly reduce bullying, physical aggression and victimization, a new study found.
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Study: Children exceeding recommended screen time
The Citizen-Times
Guidelines limiting children's screen time should be revised to reflect the growing use of mobile technology, health researchers say. But local experts say that while strengthening the parameters is a good idea, it's unlikely new recommendations will be followed any more than the old ones are.
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The benefit of recess before lunch
The Atlantic
Getting school children to eat more of the healthy foods on their plates doesn’t have to involve forcing them, tricking them or slathering on the butter and cheese. The answer might be as simple as scheduling their lunch time for after recess, instead of before. That’s the conclusion of a new study led by Joseph Price at Brigham Young University and David Just at Cornell University.
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Study: Exercise boosts teens' brains
Stuff
Heard the expression "Ask a teen — they know everything?" A new Dunedin study suggests they could be even smarter with regular exercise. The research has revealed regular physical activity improves brain function in young adults, University of Otago psychology department senior lecturer Dr. Liana Machado said.
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Teen smoking, even light amounts, is harmful to overall physical health
Medical Daily
It’s probably safe to say that as teens we all knew someone who smoked cigarettes, someone who swore they never would and someone who said they only did it here and there. Just like hookah, smoking cigarettes here and there may seem harmless, but it’s not. Yet many teens believe it is, according to a new study.
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Teens who skimp on sleep now have more drinking problems later
NPR
Sleep-deprived teenagers find it difficult to focus in class, and they're more likely get sick. They are also more likely to develop problems with alcohol later on, according to a study published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. The study included teens who suffered from conditions like insomnia as well as those who simply weren't getting enough sleep.
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Pizza wreaking havoc on kids' diets, research shows
Good Morning America via ABC News
Pizza may be the cheap, easy meal parents know their kids will actually eat, but it may be doing more harm than good, new research shows. A new study published today in the medical journal Pediatrics shows that pizza helps contribute to a higher overall calorie intake for children on days they eat it. On those days, it accounts for more than 20 percent of their daily calorie intake and increased the amount of saturated fat and salt in children's diets.
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Study: US teen pregnancy rate still highest
The Hill
The U.S. still has the highest rate of teen pregnancy among countries that collect complete data, despite a marked decline since the 1990s. The U.S. rate of 57 pregnancies per 1,000 15- to 19-year-olds was higher than New Zealand (51) and England and Wales (47), the nonprofit Guttmacher Institute found in a new study.
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Teen girls report less sexual victimization after virtual reality assertiveness training
Medical Xpress
Teen girls were less likely to report being sexually victimized after learning to assertively resist unwanted sexual overtures and practicing resistance in a realistic virtual environment, finds a new study. The effects persisted over a three-month period following the training, said clinical psychologist Lorelei Simpson Rowe, lead author on the pilot study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
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TV alcohol ads tied to problem drinking for teens
HealthDay News
A new study finds a link between the number of TV ads for alcohol a teen views, and their odds for problem drinking. Higher "familiarity" with booze ads "was associated with the subsequent onset of drinking across a range of outcomes of varying severity among adolescents and young adults," wrote a team led by Dr. Susanne Tanski of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.
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